Clements Checklist

Updates & Corrections – August 2011

Posted August 23, 2011

The Updates and Corrections are grouped into four sections. Within each section, items are listed in the order in which they are encountered in the Clements Checklist 6.6 spreadsheet, although we also continue to reference by page number the relevant entry in the last published edition of the Clements Checklist (sixth edition, 2007).

The four sections are

1.  Species — gains and losses

2.  Families – gains, losses, and changes to family composition or nomenclature

3.  Standard Updates and Corrections — all other changes, listed in sequence as they occur in the spreadsheet

4.  Groups – a list of new groups

SPECIES

SPECIES GAINS (splits and newly discovered species)

Page 46, Common Buzzard  Buteo buteo

We follow Porter and Kirwan (2010) in elevating Buteo buteo bannermani, formerly classified as a subspecies of Common Buzzard, to species rank as Cape Verde Buzzard Buteo bannermani.
Reference:
Porter, R F., and G.M. Kirwan. 2010. Studies of Socotran birds VI. The taxonomic status of the Socotra Buzzard. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 116-131.

Page (addition), Socotra Buzzard  Buteo socotraensis
It has been known since the late 19th century that there was a breeding population of buzzards (Buteo) on Socotra Island, but this population was poorly known. It resembles other Old World buzzards, in morphology, plumage, and genetics, but differs from all other Old World buzzards in many features, and so is described as a new species, Socotra Buzzard Buteo socotraensis, with range “Socotra I. (off ne Somalia).” Position Socotra Buzzard immediately preceding Long-legged Buzzard (Buteo rufinus).
Reference:
Porter, R.F., and G.M. Kirwan. 2010. Studies of Socotran birds VI. The taxonomic status of the Socotra Buzzard. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 116-131.

Page (addition), Pinsker’s Hawk-Eagle  Nisaetus pinskeri
Described as a subspecies of Philippine Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus philippensis pinskeri), but inadvertently omitted from earlier editions of Clements Checklist; genetic data now shows that pinskeri is a distinct species, and is added as Pinsker’s Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus pinskeri).
Range: Negros, Samar, Mindanao, Bohol, Biliran, Basilan, and Siquijor (Philippine Islands)
References:
Preleuthner, M., and A. Gamauf. 1998. A possible new subspecies of the Philippine Hawk-Eagle (Spizaëtus philippensis) and its future prospects. Journal of Raptor Research 32: 126-135.
Gamauf, A., J.O. Gjershaug, N. Røv, K. Kvaløy, and E. Haring. 2005. Species or subspecies? The dilemma of taxonomic ranking of some South-east Asian hawk-eagles (genus Spizaetus). Bird Conservation International 15: 99-117.
Haring, E., K. Kvaløy, J.-O. Gjershaug, N.  Røv, and A. Gamauf. 2007. Convergent evolution and paraphyly of the hawk-eagles of the genus Spizaetus (Aves, Accipitridae) – phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial markers. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 45: 353-365.

Page 55, Speckled Chachalaca  Ortalis guttata
Subspecies colombiana is elevated to species rank as Colombian Chachalaca Ortalis columbiana.
References:
SACC proposal 439

Page (addition), Tsingy Wood-Rail  Canirallus beankaensis
Goodman et al. (2011) describe this new species of wood-rail from the tsingy formations of central west Madagascr; insert it immediately following the Madagascar Wood-Rail Canirallus kioloides. The new species was described as Mentrocrex beankaensis; the Clements Checklist long has classified the closely-related Malagascar Wood-Rail in the genus Canirallus, however, so provisionally we place the new species in the same genus.
Reference:
Goodman, S.M., M.J. Raherilalao, and N.L. Block. 2011. Patterns of morphological and genetic variation in the Mentocrex kioloides complex (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae) from Madagascar, with the description of a new species. Zootaxa number 2776: 49–60.

Page 81, Water Rail  Rallus aquaticus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Rallus aquaticus indicus, formerly classified as a subspecies of Water Rail, to species rank as Brown-cheeked Rail Rallus indicus.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 85, Common Moorhen  Gallinula chloropus
The Common Moorhen is split into two species, based on recent evidence from vocalizations and genetics, as summarized in a proposal ratified by SACC and by NACC: an Old World species (Gallinula chloropus) and a New World species (Gallinula galeata). The English names proposed by NACC – Common Moorhen and Common Gallinule, respectively – are an odd pair. We suggest that these species be called Eurasian Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) and Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata), although other, and perhaps better, options are available.
References:
NACC proposal 2010-A-10 

SACC proposal 416

Page 90, Eurasian Thick-knee  Burhinus oedicnemus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Burhinus oedicnemus indicus, formerly classified as a subspecies of Eurasian Thick-knee, to species rank as Indian Thick-knee Burhinus indicus.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 94, Snowy Plover  Charadrius alexandrinus
The Snowy Plover is split into two species, an Old World species and a New World species, based on recent evidence from genetics, morphology, plumage, and vocalizations; the evidence supporting the split is summarized in a proposal ratified by NACC, and pending before SACC. The English name of the Old World species is changed to Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus), and the scientific name of the New World species is changed to Snowy Plover (Charadrius nivosus).
References:
NACC proposal 2010-A-1 

SACC proposal 482

Page 91, Cream-colored Courser  Cursorius cursor
We elevate subspecies somalensis and littoralis to species rank as Somali Courser Cursorius somalensis.
Reference:
Pearson, D.J., and J.S. Ash. 1996. The taxonomic position of the Somali courser Cursorius (cursor) somalensis. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 116: 225-229.

Page 162, Oriental Bay-Owl  Phodilus badius
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating subspecies ripleyi and assimilis, formerly classified as subspecies of Oriental Bay-Owl Phodilus badius, to species rank as Sri Lanka Bay-Owl Phodilus assimilis.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 169, Tawny Owl  Strix aluco
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating subspecies nivicola, formerly classified as asubspecies of Tawny Owl Strix aluco, to species rank as Himalayan Owl Strix nivicola.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 191, Fork-tailed Swift  Apus pacificus
A recent review of geographic variation in the Fork-tailed Swift results in revisions to the ranges of several subspecies, a change in the scientific name of one subspecies, the elevation of three subspecies to species rank, and a change in the English name for Apus pacificus:
The range of subspecies Apus pacificus pacificus is revised from “Siberia to Kamchatka, n China and s Japan; winters to Australia” to “Siberia to Kamchatka, n China and n Japan; winters Indonesia, Melanesia, Australia, Tasmania”.
The name of subspecies Apus pacificus kanoi is changed to Apus pacificus kurodae, and the range of this subspecies is revised from “Southeast Tibet to e China and Taiwan; winters to Indonesia” to “e China, s Japan and Taiwan; winters in Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia.”
Apus salimali had been overlooked as a synonym of Apus pacificus kanoi, but instead deserves recognition as a full species, Salim Ali’s Swift (Apus salimali) and a range of “e Tibetan plateau, w Sichuan; winter range unknown.”
Formerly classified as a subspecies of Fork-tailed Swift, leuconyx is elevated to species rank, as Blyth’s Swift (Apus leuconyx).
     Formerly classified as a subspecies of Fork-tailed Swift, cooki is elevated to species rank, as Cook’s Swift (Apus cooki).
     With several subspecies removed from Fork-tailed Swift, the English name for the species changes to Pacific Swift (Apus pacificus).
Reference:
Leader, P.J. 2011. Taxonomy of the Pacific Swift Apus pacificus Latham, 1802 complex. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 131: 81-93.

Page 229, Red-billed Hornbill  Tockus erythrorhynchus
Each of the five subspecies of Red-billed Hornbill – including a recently described subspecies that was not included in previous editions of Clements Checklist – is elevated to species rank, as follows:
Western Red-billed Hornbill  Tockus kempi
Northern Red-billed Hornbill  Tockus erythrorhynchus
Tanzanian Red-billed Hornbill Tockus ruahae
The Tanzanian Red-billed Hornbill is new to Clements Checklist; the range is “central and southern Tanzania.”
Southern Red-billed Hornbill   Tockus rufirostris
Damara Red-billed Hornbill    Tockus damarensis
References:
Kemp, A.C. and W. Delport. 2002. Comments on the status of subspecies in the red-billed hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus) complex (Aves: Bucerotidae), with the description of a new taxon endemic to Tanzania. Annals of the Transvaal Museum 39: 1–8.
Delport, W., A.C. Kemp, and J.W.H. Ferguson. 2004. Structure of an African Red-billed Hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus rufirostris and T. e. damarensis) hybrid zone as revealed by morphology, behavior, and breeding biology. Auk 121: 565-586.

Page (addition), White-chested Tinkerbird  Pogoniulus makawai
The status of this enigmatic species, known from a single specimen collected in 1964, has been controversial since it first was described. This controversy is reflected in the convoluted history of the species in the Clements Checklist: it was omitted from editions 1, 4, and 6, but was included in editions 2, 3, and 5! A recent review of the characters of the sole specimen made a forceful case for recognition of White-chested Tinkerbird, so we are happy to reinstate it in Clements Checklist (with range of “Known only from a single specimen from Mayau, nw Zambia”).
Reference:
Collar, N.J., and L.D.C. Fishpool. 2006. What is Pogoniulus makawai? Bulletin of the African Bird Club 13: 18-27.

Page 260, Greater Flameback  Chrysocolaptes lucidus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Chrysocolaptes lucidus stricklandi to species rank as Crimson-backed Flameback (Chrysocolaptes stricklandi).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page (addition), Rock Tapaculo  Scytalopus petrophilus
Whitney et al. (2010) described a new species, Rock Tapaculo Scytalopus petrophilus; insert the new species immediately following Mouse-colored Tapaculo Scytalopus speluncae. The range of Rock Tapaculo is “central and southern Minas Gerais, Brazil”.
References:
Whitney, B.M., M.F. Vasconcelos, L.F. Silveira, and J.F. Pacheco. 2010. Scytalopus petrophilus (Rock Tapaculo): a new species from Minas Gerais, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia 18: 73-88.
SACC proposal 463

Page (addition), Short-tailed Batis  Batis mixta
Fjeldså et al. (2006) review the geographic variation in the Short-tailed Batis (Batis mixta). The southern populations of Short-tailed Batis (within the range of Batis mixta mixta) are described as a new species, Dark Batis (Batis crypta). Insert the Dark Batis immediately following the Short-tailed Batis; the range of this species is “S Tanzania  (north to the Ukaguru Mountains) s to n Malawi”.
Other changes resulting from this review include the merger of Batis mixta ultima into Batis mixta mixta; the range of nominate mixta changes from “Highlands of s Kenya to n Tanzania and n Malawi” to “SE Kenya, n Tanzania south to the Usambara, Nguu and Nguru Mountains.”
Finally, subspecies reichenowi is transferred from Cape Batis (Batis capensis) to Short-tailed Batis.
Reference:
Fjeldså, J., R.C K. Bowie, and J. Kiure. 2006. The forest batis, Batis mixta, is two species: description of a new, narrowly distributed Batis species in the Eastern Arc biodiversity hotspot. Journal of Ornithology 147:578–590.

Page 576, Large Woodshrike  Tephrodornis gularis
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Tephrodornis gularis sylvicola to species rank as Malabar Woodshrike (Tephrodornis sylvicola).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 576, Common Woodshrike  Tephrodornis pondicerianus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Tephrodornis pondicerianus affinis to species rank as Sri Lanka Woodshrike (Tephrodornis affinis).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 369, Bar-bellied Cuckoo-shrike  Coracina striata
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Coracina striata dobsoni to species rank as Andaman Cuckoo-shrike (Coracina dobsoni).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Pages 505-506, White-browed Shrike-Babbler  Pteruthius flaviscapis
Most subspecies of White-browned Shrike-Babbler are separated as distinct species, as is detailed below. The English name of the Pteruthius flaviscapis, which as a result becomes monotypic, is changed to Pied Shrike-babbler (Pteruthius flaviscapis).
    Subspecies Pteruthius flaviscapis ripleyi previously was considered to be a synonym of Pteruthius flaviscapis validirostris, and so did not appear in earlier editions of Clements Checklist. Now it is elevated to species rank, as Himalayan Shrike-Babbler (Pteruthius ripleyi); the range is “Pakistan east to western Nepal”.
Formerly classified as subspecies of White-browed Shrike-Babbler, the aeralatus group (aeralatus, validirostris, ricketti, schauenseei, cameranoi, and robinsoni) are elevated to species rank as Blyth’s Shrike-Babbler (Pteruthius aeralatus). Subspecies lingshuiensis is merged with merged with ricketti; consequently, revise the range of ricketti from “NE Myanmar to s China, n Thailand and n Indochina” to “NE Myanmar to s China (including Hainan), n Thailand and n Vietnam.”
Subspecies Pteruthius flaviscapis annamensis is elevated to species rank as Dalat Shrike-babbler (Pteruthius annamensis).
References:
Biswas, B. 1960. A new name for the Himalayan Red-winged Babbler, Pteruthius. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 80: 106.  [name for ripleyi]
Reddy, S. 2008. Systematics and biogeography of the shrike-babblers (Pteruthius): Species limits, molecular phylogenetics, and diversification patterns across southern Asia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 47: 54-72.
Rheindt, F.E., and J.A. Eaton. 2009. Species limits in Pteruthius (Aves: Corvida) shrike-babblers: a comparison between the Biological and Phylogenetic Species Concepts. Zootaxa number 2301: 29–54.

Page 506, Chestnut-fronted Shrike-Babbler  Pteruthius aenobarbus
The Chestnut-fronted Shrike-Babbler is split into two species. Pteruthius aenobarbus becomes monotypic, and the English name is changed to Trilling Shrike-Babbler.
     Subspecies yaoshanensis and indochinensis are merged into intermedius; the range of intermedius is revised from “E Myanmar to s Yunnan, nw Thailand, Laos and nw Tonkin” to “E Myanmar to se China, nw Thailand, Laos and n Vietnam.” The two subspecies intermedius and aenobarbulus are separated as a distinct species, Clicking Shrike-babbler (Pteruthius intermedius).
References:
Reddy, S. 2008. Systematics and biogeography of the shrike-babblers (Pteruthius): Species limits, molecular phylogenetics, and diversification patterns across southern Asia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 47: 54-72.
Rheindt, F.E., and J.A. Eaton. 2009. Species limits in Pteruthius (Aves: Corvida) shrike-babblers: a comparison between the Biological and Phylogenetic Species Concepts. Zootaxa number 2301: 29–54.

Page 568, Eurasian Golden Oriole  Oriolus oriolus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Oriolus oriolus kundoo to species rank as Indian Golden Oriole (Oriolus kundoo).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 580, Greater Racket-tailed Drongo  Dicrurus paradiseus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Dicrurus paradiseus lophorinus to species rank as Sri Lanka Drongo (Dicrurus lophorinus).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 589, Mexican Jay  Aphelocoma ultramarina
The Mexican Jay is split into two species, based on differences in appearance and genetics, as summarized in a proposal ratified by NACC. What previously had been identified in the Clements Checklist as the group Mexican Jay (Transvolcanic) Aphelocoma ultramarina ultramarina/colimae is elevated to species rank as Transvolcanic Jay Aphelocoma ultramarina, which is restricted to the highlands of southern Mexico. The second, more widespread species includes the remaining subspecies, and becomes known as Mexican Jay Aphelocoma wollweberi.
Reference:
NACC proposal 2010-B-12

Page 593, Eurasian Nutcracker  Nucifraga caryocatactes
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Nucifraga caryocatactes multipunctata to species rank as Kashmir Nutcracker (Nucifraga multipunctata).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 358, Plain Martin  Riparia paludicola
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Riparia paludicola chinensis to species rank as Gray-throated Martin (Riparia chinensis).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 362, Red-rumped Swallow  Cecropis daurica
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Cecropis daurica hyperythra to species rank as Sri Lanka Swallow (Cecropis hyperythra).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 527, Black-lored Tit  Parus xanthogenys
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Parus xanthogenys aplonotus and Parus xanthogenys tranvancoreensis to species rank as Indian Tit (Parus  aplonotus). Parus xanthogenys becomes monotypic, and retains the English name Black-lored Tit.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 527, White-cheeked Nuthatch  Sitta leucopsis
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Sitta leucopsis przewalskii to species rank as Przevalski’s Nuthatch (Sitta przewalskii).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 381, Tiny Greenbul  Phyllastrephus debilis
Subspecies albigula is elevated to species rank, as Usambara Greenbul (Phyllastrephus albigula).
Reference:
Fuchs, J., J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2011. Diversification across an altitudinal gradient in the Tiny Greenbul (Phyllastrephus debilis) from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Africa. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 117.

Page 376, Black-headed Bulbul  Pycnonotus atriceps
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Pycnonotus atriceps fuscoflavescens to species rank as Andaman Bulbul (Pycnonotus  fuscoflavescens).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 376, Black-crested Bulbul  Pycnonotus melanicterus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in splitting the Black-crested Bulbul into five species:

Pycnonotus melanicterus gularis, previously identified in Clements Checklist as the group Black-crested Bulbul (Flame-throated), becomes Flame-throated Bulbul (Pycnonotus gularis).

Pycnonotus melanicterus melanicterus, previously identified in Clements Checklist as the group Black-crested Bulbul (Black-capped), becomes Black-capped Bulbul (Pycnonotus melanicterus).

Subspecies flaviventris, vantynei, xanthops, negatus, johnsoni, auratus, elbeli, and caecilii are split from Pycnonotus melanicterus as Black-crested Bulbul (Pycnonotus flaviventris).

Pycnonotus melanicterus dispar, previously identified in Clements Checklist as the group Black-crested Bulbul (Ruby-throated), becomes Ruby-throated Bulbul (Pycnonotus dispar).

Pycnonotus melanicterus montis, previously identified in Clements Checklist as the group Black-crested Bulbul (Bornean), becomes Bornean Bulbul (Pycnonotus montis).

Page 378, Olive-winged Bulbul  Pycnonotus plumosus
Subspecies cinereifrons is elevated to species rank as Ashy-fronted Bulbul (Pycnonotus cinereifrons).
     Oliveros, C.H., and R.G. Moyle. 2010. Origin and diversification of Philippine bulbuls. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 54: 822–832.

Page 382, Gray-cheeked Bulbul  Alophoixus bres
Subspecies frater is elevated to species rank as Gray-throated Bulbul (Alophoixus frater).
     Oliveros, C.H., and R.G. Moyle. 2010. Origin and diversification of Philippine bulbuls. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 54: 822–832.

Page (addition), Moheli Bulbul  Hypsipetes moheliensis
Originally moheliensis was described as a subspecies of Seychelles Bulbul Hypsipetes crassirostris. Most later authors treated moheliensis as a subspecies of Grand Comoro Bulbul (Hypsipetes parvirostris), but it was overlooked completely by earlier editions of Clements Checklist. Genetic evidence now indicates that it should be ranked as a full species, Moheli Bulbul Hypsipetes moheliensis.
References:
Benson, C.W. 1960. The birds of the Comoro Islands: results of the British Ornithologists’ Union centenary expedition. Ibis 103b: 5-106
Warren, B.H., E. Bermingham, R.P. Prŷs-Jones, and C. Thebaud. 2005. Tracking island colonization history and phenotypic shifts in Indian Ocean bulbuls (Hypsipetes: Pycnonotidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 85: 271–287.

Page 385, Black Bulbul  Hypsipetes leucocephalus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Hypsipetes leucocephalus ganeesa to species rank as Square-tailed Bulbul (Hypsipetes ganeesa).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 383, Philippine Bulbul  Ixos philippinus (now Hypsipetes philippinus; see below)
Subspecies guimarasensis is elevated to species rank, as Visayan Bulbul (Hypsipetes guimarasensis).
Reference:
Oliveros, C.H., and R.G. Moyle. 2010. Origin and diversification of Philippine bulbuls. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 54: 822–832.

Page 383, Philippine Bulbul  Ixos philippinus (now Hypsipetes philippinus; see below)
Subspecies mindorensis is elevated to species rank, as Mindoro Bulbul (Hypsipetes mindorensis).
Reference:
Oliveros, C.H., and R.G. Moyle. 2010. Origin and diversification of Philippine bulbuls. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 54: 822–832.

Page (addition), Alpine Leaf-Warbler  Phylloscopus occisinensis
     Martens el al. describe a new species, related to Tickell’s Leaf-Warbler (Phylloscopus affinis), that we add as Alpine Leaf-Warbler (Phylloscopus occisinensis).
Range: breeds e Tibet-Qinghai plateau, China in Sichuan and Gansu; winter range undescribed
Reference:
Martens, J., Y-H. Sun, and M. Päckert. 2008. Intraspecific differentiation of Sino-Himalayan bush-dwelling Phylloscopus leaf warblers, with description of two new taxa (P. fuscatus, P. fuligiventer, P. affinis, P. armandii, P. subaffinis). Vertebrate Zoology 58: 233-265.
Pilgrim, J.D., T.P. Inskipp, and N.J. Collar. 2009. Species-level changes suggested for Asian birds, 2007-2008. BirdingAsia number 12: 18-35.

Page 438, Blyth’s Leaf-Warbler  Phylloscopus reguloides
Subspecies Phylloscopus reguloides claudiae is elevated to species rank as Claudia’s Leaf-Warbler (Phylloscopus claudiae).

Subspecies Phylloscopus reguloides goodsoni and fokiensis are elevated to species rank as Hartert’s Leaf-Warbler (Phylloscopus goodsoni).
References:
Olsson, U., P. Alström, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Sundberg. 2005. Non-monophyletic taxa and cryptic species – evidence from a molecular phylogeny of leaf-warblers (Phylloscopus, Aves). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 36: 261–276.
Rheindt, F.E. 2006. Splits galore: the revolution in Asian leaf warbler systematics. BirdingASIA 5: 25-39.

Page 439, White-tailed Leaf-Warbler  Phylloscopus davisoni
The ogilviegranti group of subspecies (disturbans, intensior, klossi, and ogilviegranti) is elevated to species rank as Kloss’s Leaf-Warbler (Phylloscopus ogilviegranti). Phylloscopus davisoni becomes monotypic; to avoid confusion, it is advisable to change the English name of Phylloscopus davisoni to Davison’s Leaf-Warbler.
References:
Olsson, U., P. Alström, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Sundberg. 2005. Non-monophyletic taxa and cryptic species – evidence from a molecular phylogeny of leaf-warblers (Phylloscopus, Aves). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 36: 261–276.
Rheindt, F.E. 2006. Splits galore: the revolution in Asian leaf warbler systematics. BirdingASIA 5: 25-39.

Page 428, Russet Bush-Warbler  Bradypterus seebohmi
The confusing taxonomy and nomenclature of this complex was clarified by Dickinson et al. (2000). As a result, the ranges are revised for several subspecies, several subspecies are elevated to species rank, and an additional species (mandelli) is added to the list:
The correct scientific name of the Russet Bush-Warbler, which is widespread on the Asian mainland, is Bradypterus mandelli. The range of the nominate subspecies is “ne India, Bhutan, n and w Myanmar, sc and s China, n Thailand, n Laos, and n Vietnam.”
The range of subspecies Bradypterus mandelli melanorhynchus is restricted to “e China; winters to se China”.
The range of subspecies Bradypterus mandelli idoneus is restricted to “Langbian Plateau (Vietnam.)”
Subspecies seebohmi is elevated to species rank, as Benguet Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus seebohmi).
     Subspecies montis is elevated to species rank, as Javan Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus montis).
     Subspecies timorensis is elevated to species rank, as Timor Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus timorensis).
Reference:
Dickinson, E.C., P C. Rasmussen, P.D. Round, and F.G. Rozendaal. 2000. Systematic notes on Asian birds. 1. A review of the russet bush-warbler Bradypterus seebohmi (Ogilvie-Grant, 1895).  Zoologische Verhandelingen number 331: 11-64.

Page 419, Black-throated Prinia  Prinia atrogularis
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating the superciliaris group (subspecies erythropleura, superciliaris, waterstradti, klossi, and dysancrita) to species rank as Hill Prinia (Prinia superciliaris).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 550, Sao Tome White-eye  Zosterops ficedulinus
Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that each subspecies of Sao Tome White-eye is a separate species. Elevate subspecies feae to species rank as Sao Tome White-eye Zosterops feae; change the English name of Zosterops ficedulinus to Principe White-eye; and position Principe White-eye Zosterops ficedulinus immediately following Annobon White-eye Zosterops griseovirescens.
Reference:
Melo, M., B.H. Warren, and P.J. Jones. 2011. Rapid parallel evolution of aberrant traits in the diversification of the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology. Published online 21 May 2011. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05099.x

Page 494, Buff-breasted Babbler  Pellorneum tickelli
Subspecies Pellorneum tickelli buettikoferi is elevated to species rank, as Sumatran Babbler (Pellorneum buettikoferi), in view of its vocal, morphometric, and plumages differences.
Reference:
Wells, D.R., P. Andrew, and A.B. v. d. Berg. 2001. Systematic notes on Asian birds. 21. Babbler jungle: a re-evaluation of the ‘pyrrogenys‘ group of Asian pellorneines (Timaliidae). Zoologische Verhandeligen 335: 235-252.

Page 459, Oriental Magpie-Robin  Copsychus saularis
The Philippine populations of Oriental Magpie-Robin, subspecies mindanensis and deuteronymus, are removed from Oriental Magpie-Robin (Copsychus saularis) as a separate species, Philippine Magpie-Robin (Copsychus mindanensis). The subspecies deteronymus is merged with mindanensis, so the newly recognized species is monotypic.
Reference:
Sheldon, F.H., D.J. Lohman, H.C. Lim, F. Zou, S.M. Goodman, D.M. Prawiradilaga, K. Winker, T.M. Brailem, and R.G. Moyle. 2009. Phylogeography of the magpie-robin species complex (Aves: Turdidae: Copsychus) reveals a Philippine species, an interesting isolating barrier and unusual dispersal patterns in the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. Journal of Biogeography 36: 1070–1083.

Page 459, White-rumped Shama  Copsychus malabaricus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Copsychus malabaricus albiventris to species rank as Andaman Shama (Copsychus albiventris).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 459, Hill Blue-Flycatcher  Cyornis banyumas
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Cyornis banyumas magnirostris to species rank as Large Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis magnirostris).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 448, Brown-chested Jungle-Flycatcher  Rhinomyias brunneatus
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Rhinomyias brunneatus nicobaricus to species rank as Nicobar Jungle-Flycatcher. Both species also are transferred to the genus Cyornis (see below), so the scientific name for Nicobar Jungle-Flycatcher is Cyornis nicobaricus.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 413, White-bellied Shortwing  Brachypteryx major
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Brachypteryx major albiventris to species rank. The new species retains the Engish name White-bellied Shortwing (Brachypteryx albiventris). The English name for Brachypteryx major becomes Nilgiri Shortwing.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 466, White-headed Black-Chat  Myrmecocichla arnotti
The taxon collaris previously was not previously recognized in Clements Checklist, but instead was considered to be a synonym of the nominate subspecies of White-headed Black-Chat (Myrmecocichla arnotti arnotti). A recent review indicates that collaris is a separate taxon, and should be elevated to species rank as Ruaha Chat (Myrmecocichla collaris), with range “Primarily w Tanzania; also extreme e Democratic Republic of the Congo, e Rwanda, Burundi, n Zambia; possibly also n Malawi.” Revise the range of Myrmecocichla arnotti arnottii from from “SW Zaire to Namibia, Zambia, Tanzania, Malawi and n Transvaal” to “SW Zaire to Namibia, Zambia, seTanzania, Malawi and n Transvaal.”
Reference:
Glen, R., R.C.K. Bowie, S. Stolberger, and G. Voelker. 2011. Geographically structured plumage variation among populations of White-headed Black Chat (Myrmecocichla arnotti) in Tanzania confirms the race collaris to be a valid taxon. Journal of Ornithology 152: 63–70.

Page 407-408, Olive Thrush  Turdus olivaceus
The Olive Thrush “complex” is split into six species, and the sequence of these species is rearranged. As a result, the following five species are newly recognized:
Somali Thrush  Turdus ludoviciae
Taita Thrush  Turdus helleri
Abyssinian Thrush  Turdus abyssinicus
(includes subspecies oldeani, deckeni, abyssinicus, baraka, bambusicola, and nyikae)
Usambara Thrush  Turdus roehli
Karoo Thrush  Turdus smithi
References:
Bowie, R.C.K., P. Bloomer, P.A. Clancey, and T.M. Crowe. 2003. The Karoo Thrush (Turdus smithi Bonaparte 1850), a southern African endemic. Ostrich: Journal of African Ornithology 74: 1–7.
Bowie, R.C.K., G. Voelker, J. Fjeldså, L. Lens, S.J. Hackett, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. Systematics of the olive thrush Turdus olivaceus species complex with reference to the taxonomic status of the endangered Taita thrush T. helleri. Journal of Avian Biology 36: 391-404.

Page 408, Olivaceous Thrush  Turdus olivaceofuscus
Multiple lines of evidence (morphological, vocal, and genetic) strongly suggest that the two subspecies of Olivaceous Thrush each should be elevated to species rank. Each new species also is given a new English name, to reflect their status as single-island endemics:
Sao Tome Thrush  Turdus olivaceofuscus
Principe Thrush     Turdus xanthorhynchus
Finally, genetic evidence also indicates that the closest mainland relative of both species is the African Thrush Turdus pelios; therefore, Sao Tome Thrush and Principe Thrush are moved to a new position, immediately following African Thrush.
Reference:
Melo, M., R.C.K. Bowie, G. Voelker, M. Dallimer, N.J. Collar, and P.J. Jones. 2010. Multiple lines of evidence support the recognition of a very rare bird species: the Príncipe thrush. Journal of Zoology 282: 120–129.

Page 413, Eurasian Blackbird  Turdus merula
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating Turdus merula maximus to species rank as Tibetan Blackbird (Turdus maximus), and in elevating the group Eurasian Blackbird (Nilgiri) Turdus merula [simillimus Group] to species rank as Indian Blackbird (Turdus simillimus); Indian Blackbird includes as subspecies simillimus, bourdilloni, nigropileus, spencei, and kinnisii.
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 599, Chestnut-tailed Starling  Sturnia malabarica
The distinctive subspecies Sturnia malabarica blythii inadvertently was omitted for earlier editions of Clements Checklist. It now is added, with range “sw India.” Following Rasmussen and Anderton, we elevate this subspecies to species rank as Malabar Starling (Sturnia blythii).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 547, Plain Flowerpecker  Dicaeum concolor
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating the minullum group of subspecies (minullum, olivaceum, uchidai, borneanum, and sollicitans) to species rank as Plain Flowerpecker (Dicaeum minullum). Dicaeum concolor becomes monotypic, and takes the new English name of Nilgiri Flowerpecker.
Subspecies Dicaeum concolor virescens also is elevated to species rank, as Andaman Flowerpecker (Dicaeum virescens).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 547, Purple-throated Sunbird  Leptocoma sperata
We follow Rasmussen and Anderton in elevating the brasiliana group of subspecies (brasiliana, emmae, mecynorhyncha, eumecis, axantha, and oenopa) to species rank as Van Hasselt’s Sunbird (Leptocoma brasiliana).
Reference:
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 641, Yellow-throated Warbler  Dendroica dominica
All species of Dendroica now are transferred to the genus Setophaga (see below). The Bahamas subspecies, flavescens, of Yellow-throated Warbler differs “morphologically, vocally, ecologically, and genetically” from other subspecies, and is elevated to species rank as Bahama Warbler Setophaga flavescens.
Reference:
NACC proposal 2010-B-8

Page 676, Red-capped Cardinal  Paroaria gularis
Subspecies Paroaria gularis nigrogenis is distinctive morphologically and genetically, and overlaps with Paroaria gularis gularis locally in southwestern Venezuela. Therefore, it is elevated to species rank as Masked Cardinal (Paroaria nigrogenis). Revise the range of Masked Cardinal from “E Colombia and Venezuela; Trinidad” to “ne Colombia (south to n Meta and e Vichada), Venezuela (except far s), Trinidad.” Revise the range of Paroaria gularis gularis from “E Colombia to Venezuela, the Guianas, Peru and Amaz. Brazil” to “se Colombia to s Venezuela, the Guianas, Peru and Amaz. Brazil.”
Reference:
SACC proposal 469

Page 679, Stripe-headed Brush-Finch  Arremon torquatus
Genetic, morphological, and vocal differences, together with local sympatry of some populations, makes it clear that the Stripe-headed Brush-Finch includes more than one species. In what SACC cautions is a provisional taxonomy, SACC recommends splitting the Stripe-headed Brush-Finch into no fewer than eight species. Each of these new species corresponds to a group previously identified in the Clements Checklist, although as noted below in some cases the English name is changed:

Costa Rican Brush-Finch  Arremon costaricensis

Black-headed Brush-Finch  Arremon atricapillus
which includes subspecies tacarcunae and atricapillus

Sierra Nevada Brush-Finch  Arremon basilicus
which corresponds to the group Stripe-headed Brush-Finch (Colombian)

Phelps’s Brush-Finch  Arremon perijanus
which corresponds to the group Stripe-headed Brush-Finch (Phelp’s) – note the correction in the spelling of “Phelps’s”

Caracas Brush-Finch  Arremon phaeopleurus
which corresponds to the group Stripe-headed Brush-Finch (Buffy-flanked)

Paria Brush-Finch   Arremon phygas
which corresponds to the group Stripe-headed Brush-Finch (Venezuelan)

Gray-browed Brush-Finch  Arremon assimilis
which includes as subspecies larensis, assimilis, nigrifrons, and poliophrys

White-browed Brush-Finch  Arremon torquatus
which includes as subspecies torquatus, fimbriatus, and borelli
Reference:
SACC proposal 468

Page 629, Beautiful Rosefinch  Carpodacus pulcherrimus
We follow Rasmussen (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in splitting the Beautiful Rosefinch Carpodacus pulcherrimus into two species. The davidianus group of subspecies (waltoni, argyrophrys, and davidianus) is elevated to species rank as Chinese Beautiful Rosefinch (Carpodacus davidianus). Carpodacus pulcherrimus becomes monotypic, and the English name changes to Himalayan Beautiful Rosefinch.
References:
Rasmussen, P.C. 2005. Revised species limits and field identification of Asian rosefinches. BirdingAsia number 3: 18-27.
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 630, Spot-winged Rosefinch  Carpodacus rhodopeplus
We follow Rasmussen (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in elevating the subspecies verreauxii to species rank as Sharpe’s Rosefinch (Carpodacus verreauxii). Carpodacus rhodopeplus becomes monotypic, and retains the English name Spot-winged Rosefinch.
References:
Rasmussen, P.C. 2005. Revised species limits and field identification of Asian rosefinches. BirdingAsia number 3: 18-27.
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 630, White-browed Rosefinch  Carpodacus thura
We follow Rasmussen (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in splitting the White-browed Rosefinch Carpodacus thura into two species. The dubius group of subspecies (femininus, dubius, and deserticolor) is elevated to species rank as Chinese White-browed Rosefinch (Carpodacus dubius). Carpodacus thura includes only two subspecies, blythi and thura, and the English name changes to Himalayan White-browed Rosefinch.
References:
Rasmussen, P.C. 2005. Revised species limits and field identification of Asian rosefinches. BirdingAsia number 3: 18-27.
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 630, Red-mantled Rosefinch  Carpodacus rhodochlamys
We follow Rasmussen (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in elevating subspecies grandis to species rank as Blyth’s Rosefinch (Carpodacus grandis). Carpodacus rhodochlamys becomes monotypic, and retains the English name Red-mantled Rosefinch.
References:
Rasmussen, P.C. 2005. Revised species limits and field identification of Asian rosefinches. BirdingAsia number 3: 18-27.
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Page 630, Great Rosefinch  Carpodacus rubicilla
We follow Rasmussen (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in splitting the Great Rosefinch Carpodacus rubicilla into two species. Subspecies severtzovi is elevated to species rank as Spotted Rosefinch (Carpodacus severtzovi). The remaining three subspecies are retained in Carpodacus rubicilla, which retains the English name Great Rosefinch.
References:
Rasmussen, P.C. 2005. Revised species limits and field identification of Asian rosefinches. BirdingAsia number 3: 18-27.
Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

SPECIES LOSSES (lumps and other deletions)

Page 71, Imperial Pheasant  Lophura imperialis
Imperial Pheasant (Lophura imperialis) is deleted. This name refers to hybrids between Silver Pheasant (Lophura nycthemera) and Edwards’s Pheasant (Lophura edwardsi), and is not a valid taxon.
Reference:
Hennache, A., P. Rasmussen, V. Lucchini, S. Rimondi, and E. Randi. 2003. Hybrid origin of the imperial pheasant Lophura imperialis (Delacour and Jabouille, 1924) demonstrated by morphology, hybrid experiments, and DNA analyses. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 80: 573–600.

Page 243, Chestnut-mandibled Toucan  Ramphastos swainsonii
It long has been known that the Chestnut-mandibled Toucan was closely related to the Black-mandibled Toucan (Ramphastos ambiguus). SACC classified these as the same species, but Clements Checklist followed NACC in continuing to recognize two species. Recently, however, NACC voted to lump these species as well, and so Clements Checklist follows suit. Both Chestnut-mandibled and Black-mandibled toucans are retained as a separate groups, of course.
References:
SACC proposal 440

NACC proposals 2010-B-13

Page 594, Palm Crow  Corvus minutus
NACC classifies the Cuban Palm Crow (Corvus palmarum) and Palm Crow (Corvus minutus) as conspecific. When the Clements Checklist was revised to follow NACC (Clements Checklist 6.3, December 2008), this change was overlooked. In accord with NACC, we now consider Palm Crow to involve two monotypic island-endemic groups within a single species, known as Palm Crow (Corvus palmarum).

Page 350, Degodi Lark  Mirafra degodiensis
The Degodi Lark (Mirafra degodiensis), known only from a small area in eastern Ethiopia, now is considered to be a synonym of the nominate subspecies of Gillett’s Lark (Mirafra gilletti), and so is removed from Clements Checklist.
Reference:
Collar, N. J., C. Dingle, M. N. Gabremichael, and C. N. Spottoswoode. 2009. Taxonomic status of the Degodi Lark Mirafra degodiensis, with notes on the voice of Gillett’s Lark M. gilletti. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 129: 49-62.

Page 500, Deignan’s Babbler  Stachyris rodolphei
A recent review of the status of Deignan’s Babbler concludes that it mostly likely is a synonym of the nominate subspecies of Rufous-fronted Babbler (Stachyris rufifrons rufifrons, now Stachyridopsis rufifrons rufifrons; see below), and so Deignan’s Babbler is removed from the Clements Checklist.
References:
Collar, N.J. 2006. A partial revision of the Asian babblers (Timaliidae). Forktail 22: 85-112.
Collar, N. J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Page 450, Beijing Flycatcher  Ficedula beijingnica
Beijing Flycatcher (Ficedula beijingnica) is deleted; this ‘species’ represents the first summer (first alternate) plumage of Narcissus Flycatcher (Green-backed) Ficedula narcissina elisae, rather than a distinct taxon.
References:
Töpfer, T. 2006. Systematic notes on Asian birds. 60. Remarks on the systematic position of Ficedula elisae (Weigold, 1922). Zoologische Mededelingen 80: 203-212.
Zhang, Y.-Y., N. Wang, J. Zhang, and G.-M. Zheng. 2006. Acoustic difference of narcissus flycatcher complex. Acta Zoologica Sinica 52: 648-654.

FAMILIES

FAMILIES (newly recognized families)

Calyptomenidae (African and Green Broadbills)
Sapayoidae (Sapayoa)
Pages 264-265
, broadbills  Eurylaimidae
The “broadbill radiation”, which includes the Asities (Philepittidae), is best classified as four families. Thus, the Clements Checklist sees a gain of two new families:
Calyptomenidae (African and Green Broadbills), including the genera Smithornis and Calyptomena
   and
Sapayoidae (Sapayoa), for Sapayoa (Sapayoa aenigma).
The English name for the genera that remain in Eurylaimidae is changed to Asian and Grauer’s Broadbills.
The sequence of the “broadbill radiation” is
Calyptomenidae (African and Green Broadbills)
Eurylaimidae (Asian and Grauer’s Broadbills)
Sapayoidae (Sapayoa)
Philepittidae (Asities)
References:
Irestedt, M., J. I. Ohlson, D. Zuccon, M. Källersjö, and P. G. P. Ericson. 2006. Nuclear DNA from old collections of avian study skins reveals the evolutionary history of the Old World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes). Zooloogica Scripta 35: 567-580.
Moyle, R. G., R. T. Chesser. R. O. Prum, P. Schikler, and J. Cracraft. 2006. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Old World suboscine birds (Aves: Eurylaimides). American Museum Novitates number 3544: 1-22.
NACC proposal 2010-A-11

Cupwings (Pnoepygidae)
A new family, Cupwings (Pnoepygidae), is created for the genus Pnoepyga. Formerly these species were included in the Babblers (Timaliidae).The English group name is changed from “wren-babbler” to “cupwing”, following a suggestion by Inskipp et al. (2010).
Position the new family immediately following Penduline Tits and Long-tailed Tits (Remizidae).
Reference:
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.
Inskipp, Collar & Pilgram. 2010. Species-level and other changes suggested for Asian birds, 2009. Birding Asia 14: 59-67.

African Warblers (Macrosphenidae)
Most of the species in this family traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent genetic research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers after all. Instead, these genera, in combination with the Damara Rockjumper (Chaetops pycnopygius; now called Rockrunner Achaetops pycnopygius, see below), form a new family, the African Warblers (Macrosphenidae). Position the Macrosphenidae between the Cupwings (Pnoepygidae) and the Bush-Warblers and Allies (Cettiidae).
Most species of Bradypterus remain in their current position in the Locustellidae (Grassbirds and Allies). The Victorin’s Scrub-Warbler (Bradypterus victorini), however, is a member of the Macrosphenidae, and is not related to true Bradypterus. Consequently, this species needs to be placed in a different genus. The available name seems to be Cryptillas, and so the scientific name of the species becomes Cryptillas victorini; the English name is simplified to Victorin’s Warbler.
The sequence of genera in the Macrosphenidae is
Sylvietta
Achaetops
Melocichla
Sphenoeacus
Cryptillas
Macrosphenus
     Note that Melocichla was not included in the recent genetic studies; we tentatively include this genus in Macrosphenidae due its traditional classification near to Sphenoeacus, but as yet there is no direct evidence for its phylogenetic affinities.
References:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.
Watson, G. E., M. A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G. W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Wolters, H. E. 1983. Die Vögel Europas im System der Vögel. Biotropic, Baden-Baden.

Fulvettas and Ground Babblers (Pellorneidae)
A new family, Fulvettas and Ground Babblers (Pellorneidae), is recognized for a group of genera formerly included in the Babblers (Timalidae). The sequence of genera in the Pellorneidae is
Alcippe
Graminicola
Turdinus
Gampsorhynchus
Schoeniparus
Malacocincla
Kenopia
Pellorneum
Trichastoma
Malacopteron
Illadopsis
Ptyrticus
Napothera
Robsonius
Gypsophila
Jabouilleia
Rimator
Ptilocichla
     In earlier editions of Clements Checklist, Alcippe contained up to 23 species, but the species of Alcippe now are split among four genera. The seven species included here in Alcippe are
Nepal Fulvetta    Alcippe nipalensis
Brown Fulvetta   Alcippe brunneicauda
Black-browed Fulvetta  Alcippe grotei
Brown-cheeked Fulvetta  Alcippe poioicephala
Mountain Fulvetta   Alcippe peracensis
Javan Fulvetta    Alcippe pyrrhoptera
Gray-cheeked Fulvetta  Alcippe morrisonia
     The following seven species formerly were members members of Alcippe but now are separated in the genus Schoeniparus:
Rufous-throated Fulvetta  now Schoeniparus rufogularis
Yellow-throated Fulvetta  now Schoeniparus cinerea
Gold-fronted Fulvetta   now Schoeniparus variegaticeps
Rufous-winged Fulvetta  now Schoeniparus castaneceps
Black-crowned Fulvetta  now Schoeniparus klossi
Dusky Fulvetta   now Schoeniparus brunnea
Rusty-capped Fulvetta  now Schoeniparus dubia
 References:
Cibois, A. 2003. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of babblers (Timaliidae). Auk 120: 35-54.
Collar, N. J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.
Pasquet, E., E. Bourdon, M. V. Kalyakin, and A. Cibois. 2006. The fulvettas (Alcippe, Timaliidae, Aves): a polyphyletic group. Zoologica Scripta 35: 559-566.

Laughingthrushes (Leiothrichidae)
A new family, Laughingthrushes (Leiothrichidae), is recognized for a group of genera formerly included in the Babblers (Timalidae). The sequence of genera in the Leiothrichidae is
Babax
Garrulax
Turdoides
Kupeornis
Phyllanthus
Cutia
Leiothrix
Crocias
Heterophasia
Liocichla
Actinodura
Minla
References:
Cibois, A. 2003. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of babblers (Timaliidae). Auk 120: 35-54.
Collar, N. J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

FAMILIES (lumps)

Philippine Creepers (Rhabdornithidae)
The Philippine Creepers (Rhabdornithidae) are lumped with the Starlings (Sturnidae), and no longer are recognized as a separate family.
Reference:
Lovette, I.J., and D.R. Rubenstein. 2007. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae): congruent mtDNA and nuclear trees for a cosmopolitan avian radiation. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 44: 1031-1056.

FAMILIES (nomenclature)

Pages 531-532, Creepers  Certhiidae
The English name of the family Certhiidae is changed from “Creepers” to “Treecreepers”, since the majority of the species are known by the latter name.

Change the scientific name of the family Megaluridae (Grassbirds and Allies) to Locustellidae. The researchers who first identified this warbler radiation adopted the name Megaluridae (Alström 2006, Johansson 2008), but the correct family name is Locustellidae (Bock 1994, Sangster et al. 2010).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
W. J. Bock. 1994. History and nomenclature of avian family-group names. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History number 222.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.
Sangster, G., J. M. Collinson, A. G. Knox, D. T. Parkin, and L. Svensson. 2010. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: sixth report. Ibis 152: 180-186.

White-eyes  Zosteropidae
     Change the English name for the family Zosteropidae from White-eyes to Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies, to more accurately reflect the range of species and genera now included in the family.

FAMILIES (composition)

Vireonidae (Vireos)
Pages 505-506 shrike-babblers, Pteruthius spp.
Page 510, White-bellied Yuhina  Yuhina zantholeuca
The shrike-babblers have been included in the Timaliidae (Babblers), but genetic evidence shows that they are more closely related to the Vireonidae (Vireos). The White-bellied Yuhina (now White-bellied Erpornis Erpornis zantholeuca) most recently had been included in the Zosteropidae (Yuhinas, White-eyes, and allies), but again recent genetic evidence demonstrates that this species is more closely related to Pteruthius. Our preference would be to create a new family, separate from the vireos (Vireonidae), to accommodate the genera Pteruthius and Erpornis. No family name has been proposed formally for such a group, however, so we include both in Vireonidae. Position Pteruthius and Erpornis at the beginning of the Vireonidae (immediately following White-crowned Shrike Eurocephalus anguitimens).
Reference:
Reddy, S., and J. Cracraft. 2007. Old World Shrike-babblers (Pteruthius) belong with New World vireos (Vireonidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 44: 1352-1357.

Stenostiridae (Fairy Flycatchers)
Page 468, Yellow-bellied Fantail  Rhipidura hypoxantha
Genetic evidence indicates that this species is not a Rhipidura, but instead is a member of the Stenostiridae. It is placed immediately following Fairy Flycatcher (Stenostira scita), with new English and scientific names Yellow-bellied Fairy-Fantail Chelidorhynx hypoxantha.
References:
Fuchs, J., E. Pasquet, A. Couloux, J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. (2009. A new Indo-Malayan member of the Stenostiridae (Aves: Passeriformes) revealed by multi-locus sequence data: biogeographical implications for a morphologically diverse clade of flycatchers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 53: 384-393.
Nyári, Á.S., B.W. Benz, K.A. Jønsson, J. Fjeldså, and R.G. Moyle. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships of fantails (Aves: Rhipiduridae). Zoologica Scripta 38: 553–561.

Cettiidae (Bush-Warblers and Allies)
Page 471-472 genus Erythrocercus   (Monarchidae: Monarch Flycatchers)
Several recent studies, based on phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data, are consistent in showing that the Chestnut-capped Flycatcher Erythrocercus mccallii is not a member of the Monarchidae (Monarch Flycatchers), but instead is more closely related to the Cettiidae (Bush-Warblers and Allies). We suspect that further research will show that Erythrocercus, and perhaps other genera, belong in a separate family related to the Cettiidae. For the moment, however, given that it seems clear that Erythrocercus does not belong with Monarchidae, we move all three species of this genus to the beginning of the Cettiidae. Position Erythrocercus immediately following Kretschmer’s Longbill  Macrosphenus kretschmeri.
References:
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.
Irestedt, M., M. Gelang, G. Sangster, U. Olsson, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Alström. 2011. Neumann’s Warbler Hemitesia neumanni (Sylvioidea): the sole African member of a Palaeotropic Miocene avifauna. Ibis 153: 78-86.
Alström, P., J. Fjeldså, S. Fregin, and U. Olsson. 2011. Gross morphology betrays phylogeny: the Scrub Warbler Scotocerca inquieta is not a cisticolid. Ibis 153: 87–97.

Page 419, Streaked Scrub-Warbler  Scotocerca inquieta
Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this species is not a member of the Cisticolidae (Cisticolas and Allies); rather, it is more closely related to the Cettiidae (Bush-Warblers and Allies). Position Scotocerca immediately following Kretschmer’s Longbill  Macrosphenus kretschmeri and the genus Erythrocercus (see note below).
Also, we simplify the English name of the species to Scrub Warbler, in accordance with most recent literature on this species.
References:
Alström, P., J. Fjeldså, S. Fregin, and U. Olsson. 2011. Gross morphology betrays phylogeny: the Scrub Warbler Scotocerca inquieta is not a cisticolid. Ibis 153: 87–97.

Page 435, Neumann’s Warbler  Hemitesia neumanni
Genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this species is not a member of the Sylviidae (Old World Warblers), but instead is a member of the Cettiidae (Bush-Warblers and Allies).
Reference:
Irestedt, M., M. Gelang, G. Sangster, U. Olsson, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Alström. 2011. Neumann’s Warbler Hemitesia neumanni (Sylvioidea): the sole African member of a Palaeotropic Miocene avifauna. Ibis 153: 78-86.

Sylviidae (Old World Warblers)
Page 496, African Hill Babbler  Pseudoalcippe abyssinica
Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this species is a member of the Old World Warblers (Sylviidae), and is not a babbler (Timaliidae). Indeed, the African Hill Babbler may be more closely related to some species in the genus Sylvia, than these species are to other species of Sylvia. For the time being we position the African Hill Babbler adjacent to Sylvia, immediately following Fire-tailed Myzornis Myzornis pyrrhoura. We anticipate that future changes are in store, however, for the nomenclature of Sylvia and related species.
References:
Cibois, A. 2003. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of babblers (Timaliidae). Auk 120: 35-54.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.
Voelker, G., M. Melo, and R. C. K. Bowie. 2009. A Gulf of Guinea island endemic is a member of a Mediterranean-centred bird genus. Ibis 151: 580-583.

Page 509, Bush Blackcap  Lioptilus nigricapillus
The status of this species is similar to that of African Hill Babbler (see note above). Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this species is a member of the Old World Warblers (Sylviidae), and is not a babbler (Timaliidae). For the time being we position Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler adjacent to Sylvia, immediately following Fire-tailed Myzornis Myzornis pyrrhoura and African Hill Babbler Pseudoalcippe abyssinica.
References:
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 509, Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler  Horizorhinus dohrni
The status of this species is similar to that of African Hill Babbler (see note above). Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this species is a member of the Old World Warblers (Sylviidae), and is not a babbler (Timaliidae). As with the African Hill Babbler, Dorhrn’s Thrush-Babbler may be more closely related to some species in the genus Sylvia, than these species are to other species of Sylvia. For the time being we position Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler adjacent to Sylvia, immediately following African Hill Babbler Pseudoalcippe abyssinica and Bush Blackcap Lioptilus nigricapillus.
References:
Voelker, G., M. Melo, and R. C. K. Bowie. 2009. A Gulf of Guinea island endemic is a member of a Mediterranean-centred bird genus. Ibis 151: 580-583.

Pages 507-509, fulvettas  Alcippe spp.
Recent genetic work demonstrated that the species of fulvetta belong to no fewer than four genera, two of which also are not even babblers. Among the resulting changes are:
Golden-breasted Fulvetta Alcippe chrysotis. This species belongs with the Old World Warblers (Sylviidae). Consequently, it requires a new genus name, and becomes Golden-breasted Fulvetta (Lioparus chrysotis). Position the Golden-breasted Fulvetta immediately after the Green Hylia Hylia prasina. (The Green Hylia almost surely does not belong in Sylviidae, by the way, but remains stuck there for now in the absence of a clear indication of its true affinities.)
The following species also are transferred to the Sylviidae, but are assigned to the genus Fulvetta. They are inserted, in the sequence listed below, following Rufous-tailed Babbler Chrysomma poecilotis:
Spectacled Fulvetta    now Fulvetta ruficapilla
Indochinese Fulvetta   now Fulvetta danisi
Chinese Fulvetta            now Fulvetta striaticollis
White-browed Fulvetta   now Fulvetta vinipectus
Taiwan Fulvetta     now Fulvetta formosana
Gray-hooded Fulvetta     now Fulvetta cinereiceps
Streak-throated Fulvetta  now Fulvetta manipurensis
Ludlow’s Fulvetta   now Fulvetta ludlowi
    Note that we had reversed the English names of Fulvetta cinereiceps and Fulvetta manipurensis in the Clements Checklist spreadsheet 6.5 of December 2009; that mistake is corrected here.
References:
Cibois, A. 2003. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of babblers (Timaliidae). Auk 120: 35-54.
Collar, N. J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.
Pasquet, E., E. Bourdon, M. V. Kalyakin, and A. Cibois. 2006. The fulvettas (Alcippe, Timaliidae, Aves): a polyphyletic group. Zoologica Scripta 35: 559-566.

Zosteropidae (Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies)
Page 500, Chestnut-faced Babbler  Stachyris whiteheadi
Luzon Striped-Babbler  Stachyris striata
Panay Striped-Babbler  Stachyris latistriata
Negros Striped-Babbler  Stachyris nigrorum
Palawan Striped-Babbler  Stachyris hypogrammica
      These five species are not “true” Stachyris, indeed they are not members of the Babblers (Timaliidae) at all; rather, they belong the Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies (Zosteropidae). All are transferred to the genus Zosterornis, and for some species the ending of the species name changes as well:
Luzon Striped-Babbler Stachyris striata becomes Zosterornis striatus
Panay Striped-Babbler Stachyris latistriata becomes Zosterornis latistriatus
Palawan Striped-Babbler Stachyris hypogrammica becomes Zosterornis hypogrammicus
References:
Cibois, A. 2003. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of babblers (Timaliidae). Auk 120: 35-54.
Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (Babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.
Moyle, R. G., C. E. Filardi, C. E. Smith, and J. Diamond. 2009. Explosive Pleistocene diversification and hemispheric expansion of a “great speciator.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106: 1863–1868.

Page 500, Visayan Pygmy-Babbler  Stachyris pygmaea
Mindanao Pygmy-Babbler  Stachyris plateni
Golden-crowned Babbler  Stachyris dennistouni
Black-crowned Babbler  Stachyris nigrocapitata
Rusty-crowned Babbler  Stachyris capitalis
      These five species are not “true” Stachyris, indeed they are not members of the Babblers (Timaliidae) at all; rather, they belong the Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies (Zosteropidae). All are transferred to the genus Sterrhoptilus, and for some species the ending of the species name changes as well:
Visayan Pygmy-Babbler Stachyris pygmaea becomes Sterrhoptilus pygmaeus
Black-crowned Babbler  Stachyris nigrocapitata becomes Sterrhoptilus nigrocapitatus
References:
Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (Babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Moyle, R. G., C. E. Filardi, C. E. Smith, and J. Diamond. 2009. Explosive Pleistocenediversification and hemispheric expansion of a “great speciator.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106: 1863–1868.

Page 500, Flame-templed Babbler  Stachyris speciosa
      This species also is not a “true” Stachyris, indeed it is not a  member of the Babblers (Timaliidae) at all; rather, the Flame-templed Babbler belongs with the Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies (Zosteropidae). It is transferred to the genus Dasycrotapha. Also, remove the entry for “Stachyris [Dasycrotapha] speciosa ssp,” and the species becomes monotypic. Revise the species range to “Negros and Panay, c Philippines; population on Panay may be an undescribed subspecies.”
References:
Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (Babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Moyle, R. G., C. E. Filardi, C. E. Smith, and J. Diamond. 2009. Explosive Pleistocene diversification and hemispheric expansion of a “great speciator.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106: 1863–1868.

Promeropidae (Sugarbirds)
Page 493, Spot-throat  Modulatrix stictigula
Dapple-throat  Arcanator orostruthus
Gray-chested Illadopsis  Kakamega poliothorax
All three of these genera traditionally were classified in the Babblers (Timaliidae). Recent genetic data reveals that none are Babblers, but that all are closer to the Sugarbirds (Promeropidae). It is possible that further research will reveal that they are not members of Promeropidae, but instead merit a family of their own. In the absence of any further information on their relationships, however, and in light of firm evidence that none are members of the Timaliidae, we transfer all three genera to the Promeropidae.
References:
Barker, F.K., A. Cibois, P. Schikler, J. Feinstein, and J. Cracraft. 2004. Phylogeny and diversification of the largest avian radiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America 101: 11040-11045.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers)
Page 414, Fire-crested Alethe  Alethe diademata
Genetic evidence reveals that the Fire-crested Alethe belongs with the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers), and not with the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies).
References:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Page 414, Brown-chested Alethe  Alethe poliocephala
Red-throated Alethe  Alethe poliophrys
Cholo Alethe  Alethe choloensis
White-chested Alethe  Pseudalethe fuelleborni
Genetic evidence indicates that these alethes are not members of the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies), but instead belong to the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers). They also, however, belong to a different section of the Muscicapidae than does the Fire-crested Alethe, and so these four species all are transferred to the genus Pseudalethe.
References:
Beresford, P. 2003. Molecular systematic of Alethe, Sheppardia and some other African robins (Muscicapoidea). Ostrich 74: 58-73.
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Page 413, Great Shortwing  Heinrichia calligyna
Genetic evidence indicates that the Great Shortwing (Heinrichia calligyna) is not a member of the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies), but instead belongs to the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers).
Reference:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.

Page 413, Rusty-bellied Shortwing  Brachypteryx hyperythra
Gould’s Shortwing  Brachypteryx stellata
White-bellied Shortwing  Brachypteryx major
Lesser Shortwing  Brachypteryx leucophrys
White-browed Shortwing  Brachypteryx montana
Genetic evidence indicates that the genus Brachypteryx is not a member of the Turdidae (Thrushes), but instead belongs in the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers). Also note that subspecies Brachypteryx major albiventris is elevated to species rank (see above), and retains the English name White-bellied Shortwing; as a consequence the English name for Brachypteryx major changes to Nilgiri Shortwing.
References:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Page 402, Ceylon Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus blighi
Shiny Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus melanurus
Javan Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus glaucinus
Chestnut-winged Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus castaneus
Bornean Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus borneensis
Malayan Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus robinsoni
Malabar Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus horsfieldii
Formosan Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus insularis
Blue Whistling-Thrush  Myophonus caeruleus
Genetic evidence indicates that the whistling-thrushes (Myophonus) are not members of the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies), but instead belong to the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers).
References:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Page 401, Little Rock-Thrush  Monticola rufocinereus
Chestnut-bellied Rock-Thrush  Monticola rufiventris
White-throated Rock-Thrush  Monticola gularis
Blue-capped Rock-Thrush  Monticola cinclorhynchus
Short-toed Rock-Thrush  Monticola brevipes
Sentinel Rock-Thrush  Monticola explorator
Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush  Monticola erythronota
Forest Rock-Thrush  Monticola sharpei
Benson’s Rock-Thrush  Monticola bensoni
Littoral Rock-Thrush  Monticola imerina
Rufous-tailed Rock-Thrush  Monticola saxatilis
Blue Rock-Thrush  Monticola solitarius
Miombo Rock-Thrush  Monticola angolensis
Cape Rock-Thrush  Monticola rupestris
Genetic evidence indicates that the rock-thrushes (Monticola) are not members of the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies), but instead belong to the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers).
References:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies)
Page 462, Purple Cochoa  Cochoa purpurea
Green Cochoa  Cochoa viridis
Sumatran Cocha  Cochoa beccarii
Javan Cochoa  Cochoa azurea
The genus Cochoa belongs with the Turdidae (Thrushes and Allies), and not with the Muscicapidae (Old World Flycatchers).
References:
Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392.
Voelker, G., and G.M. Spellman. 2004. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence of polyphyly in the avian superfamily Muscicapoidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 386–394.

Motacillidae (Wagtails and Pipits)
Page 436, Bocage’s Longbill Amaurocichla bocagei
Recent genetic evidence (phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data) reveals that this enigmatic terrestrial “warbler” is more closely related to the Wagtails and Pipits (Motacillidae). Consequently Amaurocichla is removed from the Old World Warblers (Sylviidae) and moved to the Motacillidae. In addition, change the English name from Bocage’s Longbill to Sao Tome Short-tail.
Reference:
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Passeridae (Old WORLD Sparrows)
Page 556, Cinnamon White-eye  Hypocryptadius cinnamomeus
Genetic evidence indicates that this enigmatic species is not a white-eye (Zosteropidae (Yuhinas, White-eyes, and Allies), but instead is a member of the Passeridae. Position this species at the beginning of the Old World Sparrows (Passeridae). Change the English name to Cinnamon Ibon.
References:
Fjeldså, J., M. Irestedt, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2010. The Cinnamon Ibon Hypocryptadius cinnamomeus is a forest canopy sparrow. Ibis 152: 747-760.
Kennedy, R.S., P C. Gonzalez, E.C. Dickinson, H.C. Miranda, Jr., and T.H. Fisher. 2000. A guide to the birds of the Philippines. Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York.