Clements Checklist

Updates & Corrections – December 2009

Despite our efforts to post a clean checklist and Updates and Corrections, a few errors crept in. Please view the end of our 2009 Updates and Corrections for documentation on mistakes in spreadsheets 6.4. We also have corrected some typographic and other errors in our Updates and Corrections pages, and have added some additional documentation of the changes in this year’s checklist revisions. Finally, we revise our count of the number of families recognized in Clements Checklist, and we provide a new listing of the families currently recognized in Clements Checklist. Our apologies for making these mistakes, and our thanks to diligent Clements Checklist users for catching and reporting our errors.
–The Clements Checklist team, 23 December 2009.

Page 6, Elegant Crested Tinamou Eudromia elegans
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Elegant Crested-Tinamou

Page 6, Quebracho Crested Tinamou Eudromia formosa
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Quebracho Crested-Tinamou

Page 8, Short-winged Grebe Rollandia microptera
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Titicaca Grebe.

Page 9, Silvery Grebe Podiceps occipitalis
Each of the two subspecies of Silvery Grebe is identifiable in the field, and so each constitutes a separate group. To avoid confusion with the related (and similar) Junin Grebe Podiceps taczanowskii, change the names of the two groups of Silvery Grebe to:
–group¬†Podiceps occipitalis juninensis¬†¬†Silvery Grebe (juninensis)
–group¬†Podiceps occipitalis occipitalis¬†¬†Silvery Grebe (occipitalis)

Page 9, Yellow-nosed Albatross (Gray-headed) Thalassarche chlororhynchos chlororhynchos
Yellow-nosed Albatross (White-headed) Thalassarche chlororhynchos bassi
There are two subspecies of the Yellow-nosed Albatross, each of which is distinctive and is treated in Clements as a group. We are revising the English names of each group, however, as follows:
Yellow-nosed Albatross (Atlantic) Thalassarche chlororhynchos chlororhynchos
Yellow-nosed Albatross (Indian) Thalassarche chlororhynchos bassi

Page 9, Shy Albatross Thalassarche cauta
In accord with SACC, this has been split into three species:
White-capped Albatross Thalassarche cauta (with subspecies cauta and steadi)
Salvin’s Albatross Thalassarche salvini
Chatham Albatross Thalassarche eremita

Page 9, Black-browed Albatross (melanophris) Thalassarche melanophris melanophris
Black-browed Albatross (impavida) Thalassarche melanophris impavida
There are two subspecies of the Black-browed Albatross, each of which is distinctive and is treated in Clements as a group. We are revising the English names of each group, however, as follows:
Black-browed Albatross (Black-browed) Thalassarche melanophris melanophris
Black-browed Albatross (Campbell) Thalassarche melanophris impavida

Page 10, Tahiti Petrel Pterodroma rostrata becki
This very poorly known petrel recently was rediscovered in the waters adjacent to the Bismarck Archipelago, northeast of New Guinea. It is elevated to species status as Beck’s Petrel Pterodroma becki, and the range statement is revised to Breeding sites unknown (New Ireland?); ranges to Bismarck A. and Solomon I.
Reference:
Shirihai, H. 2008. Rediscovery of Beck’s Petrel Pseudobulweria becki, and other observations of tubenoses from the Bismarck archipelago, Papua New Guinea. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 3-16.

Page 11, Defilippe’s Petrel Pterodroma defilippiana
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Masatierra Petrel.

Page 11, Fiji Petrel Pterodroma macgillivrayi
This very poorly-known species recently was observed for the first time at sea. Therefore, revise the range statement to Breeds Gau I. (Fiji). Distribution at sea unknown.
Reference:
Shirihai, H., T. Pym, J. Kretzschmar, K. Moce, A. Taukei, and D. Watling. 2009. First observations of Fiji Petrel Pseudobulweria macgillivrayi at sea: off Gau Island, Fiji, in May 2009. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 129: 129-148.

Page 11, Herald Petrel (Trinidade) Pterodroma arminjoniana arminjoniana
A typo in the English name for this group is corrected to Herald Petrel (Trindade).

Page 11, Antarctic Prion Pachyptila desolata
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Dove Prion.

Page 12, Fulmar Prion Pachyptila crassirostris
In accord with OSNZ, three subspecies (not two) are recognized for Fulmar Prion, and the name of one subspecies (eatoni) is changed. The new arrangement is as follows:
Pachyptila crassirostris crassirostris Breeds Snares and Bounty and Chatham islands (New Zealand)
Pachyptila crassirostris pyramidalis Breeds Chatham islands (New Zealand)
Pachyptila crassirostris flemingi  Breeds Heard and Auckland islands (New Zealand)

Page 13, Little Shearwater (elegans) Puffinus assimilis elegans
Revise the English name of this group (distinctive subspecies) to
Little Shearwater (Subantarctic) Puffinus assimilis elegans
Also, a recent review (Austin et al. 2004) of the systematics of the smaller black and white shearwaters (Audubon’s and Little Shearwaters) results in several important revisions. One finding is that the subspecies myrtae is more closely related to the Townsend’s Shearwater Puffinus auricularis than it is to other subspecies of Little Shearwater. Therefore we transfer myrtae to Townsend’s Shearwater, and also treat it as a group:
Townsend’s Shearwater (myrtae) Puffinus auricularis myrtae

Another unexpected result of this research is that the two North Atlantic subspecies, baroli and boydi, which are each other‚Äôs closest relatives, are both more closely related to the Audubon’s Shearwater Puffinus lherminieri than they are to other subspecies of Little Shearwater. There are several ways of classifying baroli and boydi in light of these results. The approach that we take is based on the recognition that baroli and boydi both need to be removed from Little Shearwater; but also that these two taxa differ significantly from one another in appearance (“significantly different” in terms of small black and white shearwaters, at least ‚Äď all of which superficially are similar to one another!) and also differ subtly in voice on the breeding grounds. Therefore we recognize both taxa as species, to be placed immediately before Audubon’s Shearwater:
Barolo Shearwater Puffinus baroli
Boyd’s Shearwater¬†Puffinus boydi

Some other taxonomic revisions may remain within this complex (for example, subspecies newelli may merit species status), so stay tuned to future updates.
References:
Austin, J. J., V. Bretagnolle, and E. Pasquet. 2004. A global molecular phylogeny of the small Puffinus hearwaters and implications for systematic of the Little-Audubon’s shearwater complex. Auk 121: 847-864.
Robb, M., K. Mullarney, and The Sound Approach. 2008. Petrels night and day. The Sound Approach. Dorset, United Kingdom.

Page 13, Audubon’s Shearwater Puffinus lherminieri
As noted above, a recent review of the systematics of the smaller black and white shearwaters (Audubon’s and Little shearwaters) results in several revisions. One of these changes, the synonymy of Mascarene Shearwater Puffinus atrodorsalis with Puffinus lherminieri bailloni, was announced in our October 2007 Updates and Corrections, but we then failed (!) to implement this change in our own spreadsheet; now, consider the job done.

As with the case of the Little Shearwater, several additional revisions are warranted. The subspecies temptator, previously considered as part of the Audubon’s Shearwater (dichrous) group, has been shown to be more closely related to the Persian Shearwater Puffinus persicus. Therefore, temptator is moved to Persian Shearwater and treated as a subspecies, Puffinus persicus temptator.

More importantly, a group of Pacific and Indian Ocean subspecies is shown to be distinct from Audubon’s Shearwaters of the Atlantic Ocean. Therefore, we elevate these populations to the rank of species as the Tropical Shearwater Puffinus bailloni, including the subspecies bailloni, dichrous, nicolae, gunax, and bannermani. Within the Tropical Shearwater, we further recognize three groups:
–Tropical Shearwater (bailloni)¬†¬†Puffinus bailloni bailloni
–Tropical Shearwater (dichrous)¬†¬†Puffinus bailloni [dichrous Group], including the subspecies dichrous, nicolae, and gunax
–Tropical Shearwater (Bannerman’s)¬†Puffinus bailloni bannermani
Reference:
Austin, J. J., V. Bretagnolle, and E. Pasquet. 2004. A global molecular phylogeny of the small Puffinus shearwaters and implications for systematic of the Little-Audubon’s shearwater complex. Auk 121: 847-864.

Page 13, White-vented Storm-Petrel Oceanites gracilis
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Elliot’s Storm-Petrel.

Page 14, European Storm-Petrel Hydrobates pelagicus
Previously the European Storm-Petrel was treated by Clements Checklist as monotypic. A recent paper demonstrated the European Storm-Petrel falls, genetically, into two well-differentiated populations, one in the Atlantic Ocean and one in the Mediterranean Sea. Other research on vocalizations shows that these populations are can be distinguished by voice on the breeding colonies. Therefore we add two subspecies to Clements Checklist, each of which also is recognized as a group:
European Storm-Petrel (British) Hydrobates pelagicus pelagicus
Breeds NE Atlantic; winter range unknown, possibly to Indian Ocean
European Storm-Petrel (Mediterranean) Hydrobates pelagicus militensis
Breeds Mediterranean; winter range unknown, possibly to Indian Ocean
References:
Cagnon, C., B. Lauga, G. H√©mery, and C. Mouch√®s. 2004. Phylogeographic differentiation of storm petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus) based on cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA variation. Marine Biology 145: 1257‚Äď1264.
Robb, M., K. Mullarney, and The Sound Approach. 2008. Petrels night and day. The Sound Approach. Dorset, United Kingdom.

Page 14, Band-rumped Storm-Petrel Oceanodroma castro
Ornithologists have been puzzled in recent years by the discovery of several breeding populations in Band-rumped Storm-Petrel, all very similar in appearance. At some sites, two breeding populations occur on the same islands, but their nesting occurs in different seasons from one another. Evidence now is accumulating that these different populations may be discrete taxa as well. Although there are suggestions of five or more discrete taxa within the complex, just three have been formally described (castro, jabejabe, and, recently, monteiroi). To treat these as groups at this juncture would be a poor choice, since the groups would need to be further split as other taxa are recognized. Pending a complete revision of the complex, we tentatively treat monteiroi and jabejabe as full species, with the expectation that the populations within castro will continue to be split off. Here we add two such taxa, both at the level of the species, to Clements Checklist. Much research remains to be done on this complex, and we expect additional taxa to be recognized in the future. The current additions are:
Monteiro’s Storm-Petrel  Oceanodroma monteiroi  Breeds (summer) Azores; at-sea range unknown
Cape Verde Storm-Petrel  Oceanodroma jabejabe Breeds (winter) on Cape Verde Islands; at-sea range unknown
References:
Robb, M., K. Mullarney, and The Sound Approach. 2008. Petrels night and day. The Sound Approach. Dorset, United Kingdom.
Bolton, M., A. L. Smith, E. G√≥mez-D√≠az, V. L. Friesen, R. Medeiros, J. Bried, J. L. Roscales, and R. W. Furness. 2008. Monteiro’s Storm-petrel Oceanodroma monteiroi: a new species from the Azores. Ibis 150: 717-727.

Page 16, Australian Gannet Morus serrator
In accord with SACC and OSNZ, change the English name to Australasian Gannet.

Page 17, Rock Shag Phalacrocorax magellanicus
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Magellan Cormorant.

Page 17, Imperial Cormorant Phalacrocorax atriceps
In the last Clements Checklist updates (Clements 6.3.2, December 2008), each of the two subspecies also was treated as a “group.” In fact, much of the variation within the species is based on color morphs that have extensive geographic overlap, and it is possible that one of the two subspecies is not even valid (see Rasmussen, 1991, Relationships between coastal South American King and Blue-eyed Shags, Condor 93: 825-839. For the present time, at least, Clements Checklist will continue to recognize two subspecies (atriceps and albiventer), but these will not be designated as groups.

Page 20, Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
In accord with NACC, this species is removed from Egretta and is placed in the monotypic genus Mesophoyx: Mesophoyx intermedia.

Page 26, Andean Flamingo Phoenicopterus andinus
In accord with SACC, change the scientific name to Phoenicoparrus andinus.

Page 26, Puna Flamingo Phoenicopterus jamesi
In accord with SACC, change the English name to James’s Flamingo and the scientific name to Phoenicoparrus jamesi.

Pages 27-28, Canada Goose Branta canadensis
Two similar subspecies of large Canada Goose, each formerly granted their own subspecies group, are merged into a single group due to high levels of introgression and the difficulty of distinguishing the two subspecies in the field. Thus, remove the groups Canada Goose (Large) and Canada Goose (Giant), and treat each as a subspecies under a single group:
–group¬†Branta canadensis moffitti/maxima¬†Canada Goose (moffitti/maxima)
–subspecies¬†Branta canadensis moffitti
–subspecies¬†Branta canadensis maxima

In addition, the English names of two other groups of Canada Goose are revised:
Change the English name of the group Canada Goose (Dusky) to Canada Goose (occidentalis/fulva)
Change the English name of the group Canada Goose (Medium) to Canada Goose (canadensis/interior).

Page 28, Upland Goose Chloephaga picta
Variation in this species is complex, and has led to differing taxonomic treatments over the years. In the last Clements Checklist updates (Clements 6.3.2, December 2008), each of the two subspecies (picta and leucoptera) also was treated as a “group.” This is not the best way to represent geographic variation in the Upland Goose, which involves not only the two subspecies but also two color morphs (in the adult male). Therefore, Clements continues to recognize the two subspecies, but the subspecies will not be designated as groups.

Page 28, steamerducks Tachyeres (all species)
In accord with SACC, change the group name of all steamerducks to Steamer-Duck:
Flying Steamer-Duck Tachyeres patachonicus
Flightless Steamer-Duck Tachyeres pteneres
Falkland Steamer-Duck Tachyeres brachypterus
White-headed Steamer-Duck Tachyeres leucocephalus

Page 29, Blue Duck Hymenolaimus malacorhynchos
In accord with OSNZ, this species currently is regarded as monotypic; therefore, delete the subspecies malacorhynchos and hymenolaimus. Revise the range statement for Blue Duck to “Mountain streams of New Zealand (w South I., central North I.).”

Page 30, Mallard Anas platyrhynchos
Beginning with the 5th edition of Clements Checklist, there has been an entry for an extinct subspecies, oustaletti, formerly found on the Marianas Islands. This entry is incorrect, in two different ways. The correct spelling of the name of the subspecies is oustaleti (with only a single ‘t’ in ‘-leti’). More importantly, this population probably was not a valid subspecies, but instead was a variable hybrid swarm between Mallard and Gray Duck (Anas superciliosa) (see Y. Ysamashina, 1948, Notes on the Marianas Mallard. Pacific Science 2: 121-124). Therefore, this subspecies no longer is recognized, and is deleted from the Clements Checklist.

Page 30, Speckled Teal Anas flavirostris
In accord with SACC, this species is split into two species: Andean Teal Anas andium (with subspecies altipetens and andium) and Yellow-billed Teal Anas flavirostris (with subspecies flavirostris and oxyptera).

Page 31, Spectacled Duck Anas specularis
In accord with SACC, this species is placed in the monotypic genus Speculanas: Spectacled Duck Speculanas specularis. The position of Spectacled Duck also moves, to a position immediately following Crested Duck Lophonetta specularioides.

Page 32, Ferruginous Pochard Aythya nyroca
In accord with NACC and with BOURC, change the English name of this species to Ferruginous Duck.

Page 33, Masked Duck Nomonyx dominica
Formerly often placed in the genus Oxyura; when placed in the genus Nomonyx, the spelling of the species name changes to dominicus: Nomonyx dominicus.

Page 39, Western Marsh-Harrier Circus aeruginosus
To reflect the name for this species adopted by the BOURC, change the English name of this species to Eurasian Marsh-Harrier.

Page 40, Gray-bellied Goshawk Accipiter poliogaster
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Gray-bellied Hawk.

Page 43, Sharp-shinned Hawk (White-breasted) Accipiter striatus [chinogaster group]
Correct the spelling of the scientific name for this pair of distinctive subspecies to chionogaster/madrensis.

Page 44, Rufous Crab-Hawk Buteogallus aequinoctialis
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Rufous Crab Hawk.

Page 46, Eurasian Buzzard Buteo buteo
In accord with BOURC, change the English name to Common Buzzard.

Pages 47-48, Wahlberg’s Eagle Aquila wahlbergi
Booted Eagle Aquila pennata
Little Eagle Aquila morphnoides
Ayres’s Hawk-Eagle Aquila ayresii
All of these eagles belong in the genus Hieraaetus, as follows:

–Wahlberg’s Eagle Hieraaetus wahlbergi
–Booted Eagle Hieraaetus pennatus
–Little Eagle Hieraaetus morphnoides
–Ayres’s Hawk-Eagle Hieraaetus ayresii

The genus Hieraaetus should be placed immediately following Aquila.

Page 48, Rufous-bellied Eagle Aquila kienerii
This species is not a member of the genus Aquila; it should be placed in the monotypic genus Lophotriorchis (Haring, E. et al., 2007. Convergent evolution and paraphyly of the hawk-eagles of the genus Spizaetus [Aves, Accipitridae] ‚Äď phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial markers. Journal of¬† Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 45: 353-365). Rufous-bellied Eagle Lophotriochis kienerii should follow the genus Hieraaetus.

Page 48, Cassin’s Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus africanus
This species belongs in the eagle genus Aquila, not in any genus of hawk-eagles (Helbig et al. 2005. A multi-gene phylogeny of aquiline eagles [Aves: Accipitriformes] reveals extensive paraphyly at the genus level. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 35: 147-164; Haring, E. et al., 2007. Convergent evolution and paraphyly of the hawk-eagles of the genus Spizaetus [Aves, Accipitridae] ‚Äď phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial markers. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 45: 353-365). Place Cassin’s Hawk-Eagle Aquila africana immediately before Verreaux’s Eagle Aquila verreauxii.

Page 48-49, Changeable Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus cirrhatus
Flores Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus floris
Mountain Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus nipalensis
Blyth’s Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus alboniger
Javan Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus bartelsi
Sulawesi Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus lanceolatus
Philippine Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus philippensis
Wallace’s Hawk-Eagle Spizaetus nanus
Recent research has shown the Asian species of hawk-eagle are not closely related to the Spizaetus hawk-eagles of Central and South America (Helbig et al. 2005. A multi-gene phylogeny of aquiline eagles [Aves: Accipitriformes] reveals extensive paraphyly at the genus level. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 35: 147-164; Haring, E. et al., 2007. Convergent evolution and paraphyly of the hawk-eagles of the genus Spizaetus [Aves, Accipitridae] ‚Äď phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial markers. Journal of¬† Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 45: 353-365). The Asian species all are moved to the genus Nisaetus. The position of Nisaetus in the checklist does not change; this genus comes immediately before Spizaetus.

Page 51, American Kestrel Falco sparverius
Correct the spelling of the endemic Cuban subspecies to sparveroides.

Pages 54-57, Family Cracidae (Guans, Chachalacas, and Currasows)
Correct the spelling of Currasows to Curassows. (This was correct in the printed sixth edition; the error was introduced in  last years updates, in spreadsheet 6.3.2.)

Page 55, Little Chachalaca Ortalis motmot
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Variable Chachalaca.

Page 57, Blue-knobbed Curassow Crax alberti
In accord with SACC, change the English name to Blue-billed Curassow.

Note added 23 December 2009:
Page 74, guineafowl
(family Numididae)
The guineafowl tradionally were recognized as a separate family, Numididae, and were so treated up through the sixth edition. In last year’s Updates and Corrections, the guineafowl were lumped into the pheasants, grouse, and allies (Phasianidae), following NACC. Now, NACC has restored the guineafowl to family status, and so Clements Checklist follows suit. Position the Numididae immediately following the guans, chachalacas, and curassows (Cracidae).

Note added 23 December 2009:
Pages 60-63, New World quail
(family Odontophoridae)
In accord with NACC, revise the position of the New World quail; the Odontophoridae now precede the pheasants, grouse, and allies (Phasianidae), rather than following the Phasianidae.

Pages 75-76, buttonquails Turnicidae
The buttonquails (Turnicidae) long have been classified in the Gruiformes, although sometimes these peculiar birds have been placed in their own order, Turniciformes. Recent research indicates instead that the buttonquails are members of the order Charadriiformes. Position the Turnicidae immediately following the sandpipers and allies (Scolopacidae).
Reference:
Baker, A. J., S. L. Pereira, and T. A. Paton. 2007. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: multigene evidence for the Cretaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds.
Biology Letters 3: 205-210.

Page 86, Kagu Rhynochetos jubatus (Rhynchotidae)
Correct the spelling of the family name to Rhynochetidae. (The name was spelled correctly in the sixth edition; the error was introduced in last year’s spreadsheet.)

Page 93, Eurasian Golden-Plover Pluvialis apricaria
In accord with NACC, change the English name to European Golden-Plover; BOURC uses a similar name, European Golden Plover.

Page 94, Lesser Sandplover Charadrius mongolus
In accord with NACC, change the English name to Lesser Sand-Plover.

Page 95, Greater Sandplover Charadrius leschenaultia
In accord with NACC, change the English name to Greater Sand-Plover.

Page 95, Diademed Plover Phegornis mitchelli
In accord with SACC, change the English name (back!) to Diademed Sandpiper-Plover.

Page 96, New Zealand snipes Coenocorypha species
In accord with OSNZ, two new species are added to Clements Checklist, and the subspecies of Subantarctic Snipe are split into separate species. Newly added species:
North Island Snipe Coenocorypha barrierensis Extinct; formerly N. Island, New Zealand
Forbes’s Snipe Coenocorypha chathamica Extinct; formerly Chatham Islands.
In addition, Subantarctic Snipe Coenocorypha aucklandica is split into the following species:
South Island Snipe Coenocorypha iredalei
Snares Island Snipe Coenocorypha huegeli
Subantarctic Snipe Coenocorypha aucklandica (with subspecies meinertzhagenae).

Page 96, Pintail Snipe Gallinago stenura
Change the English name of this species to Pin-tailed Snipe.

Page 100, Chionididae (Sheathbills)
In accord with SACC, change the family name to Chionidae.

Page 103, Blue Noddy Procelsterna cerulea
In accord with SACC and OSNZ, change the English name of this species to Blue-gray Noddy.

Page 112, Eurasian Turtle-Dove Streptopelia turtur
In accord with NACC, change the English name to European Turtle-Dove; BOURC uses a similar name, European Turtle Dove.

Page 117, Pacific Dove Zenaida meloda
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to West Peruvian Dove.

Page 118, White-faced Dove Leptotila megalura
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Large-tailed Dove.

Page 129, New Zealand Pigeon Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae
In accord with OSNZ, each of the three subspecies (one of which is extinct) is elevated to species rank. The three newly recognized species are:
New Zealand Pigeon Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae
Chatham Island Pigeon Hemiphaga chathamensis
Norfolk Island Pigeon Hemiphaga spadicea Extinct

Page 134, genera Nestor and Strigops (Psittacidae)
These parrots, the Kea, the kakas, and the Kakapo, traditionally have been classified in the large, widely distributed family of parrots, parakeets, and macaws (Psittacidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species two genera form a new family, New Zealand parrots (Strigopidae). Position the Strigopidae immediately before the cockatoos (Cacatuidae).
Reference:
Wright, T. F., E. E. Schirtzinger, T. Matsumoto, J. R. Eberhard, G. R. Graves, J. J. Sanchez, S. Capelli, H. M√ľller, J. Scharpegge, G. K. Chambers, and R. C. Fleischer. 2008. A multilocus molecular phylogeny of the parrots (Psittaciformes): support for a Gondwanan origin during the Cretaceous. Molecular Biology and Evolution 25: 2141‚Äď2156.

Page 135, Red-fronted Parakeet Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae hochstetteri
In accord with OSNZ, this subspecies is elevated to species status as
Reischek’s Parakeet Cyanoramphus hochstetteri

Page 140, Camiguin Hanging Parrot Loriculus camiguinensis
Correct the English name of this species to Camiguin Hanging-Parrot. Correct the range statement to Camiguin (Philippines).

Page 142, Lear’s Macaw Anodorhynchus leari
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Indigo Macaw.

Page 143, Golden-collared Macaw Primolius auricollis
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Yellow-collared Macaw.

Page 144, Burrowing Parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Burrowing Parakeet.

Page 144, Caatinga Parakeet Aratinga cactorum
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Cactus Parakeet.

Page 145, Santarem Parakeet (Madeira) Pyrrhura amazonum snethlage
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to snethlageae.

Page 148, Rose-faced Parrot Pionopsitta pulchra, Orange-cheeked Parrot Pionopsitta barrabandi, Brown-hooded Parrot Pionopsitta pyrilia, Caica Parrot Pionopsitta caica, Vulturine Parrot Pionopsitta vulturina, and Bald Parrot Pionopsitta aurantiocephala
In the 2008 revisions to Clements Checklist (Clements Checklist 6.3.2), all of these species were transferred to the genus Pyrilia; the genus Pionopsitta is restricted to the Pileated Parrot Pionopsitta pileata. Although this change was implemented in the Checklist, it was not documented on the 2008 Updates and Corrections pages.This change is in accord with SACC.

Page 146, Flame-winged Parakeet Pyrrhura calliptera
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Brown-breasted Parakeet.

Page 149, Cuban Parrot (Cuba) Amazona leucocephala leucocephala
Change the English name of this group to Cuban Parrot (Cuban).

Page 159, Cocos Island Cuckoo Coccyzus ferrugineus
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Cocos Cuckoo.

Page 161, Ashy-faced Owl Tyto glaucops
NACC (and most authorities) consider the Ashy-faced Owl to be monotypic. Therefore, transfer the subspecies insularis and nigrescens to Barn Owl Tyto alba.

Page 165, West Peruvian Screech-Owl Megascops roboratus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Peruvian Screech-Owl.

Page 166, Variable Screech-Owl Megascops atricapilla
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Black-capped Screech-Owl.

Page 166, Hoy’s Screech-Owl Megascops hoyi
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Montane Forest Screech-Owl.

Page 175, Northern Long-eared Owl Asio otus
In accord with NACC and BOURC, change the English name of this species to Long-eared Owl.

Page 179, Bahia Nighthawk Nyctiprogne vielliardi
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Bahian Nighthawk.

Page 179, Pauraque Nyctidromus albicollis
In accord with NACC and SACC, change the English name of this species to Common Pauraque.

Page 179, Least Poorwill Siphonorhis brewsteri
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Least Pauraque.

Page 186, Australian Swiftlet Aerodramus terraereginae terraereginae
Delete the “)” in the range statement for this subspecies; the correct entry is: Coastal n Queensland, Dunk, Hinchinbrook and Family Is.

Page 189, Vaux’s Swift Chaetura vauxi aphanes
In last year’s Updates and Corrections, we advised users to delete the species Ashy-tailed Swift Chaetura andrei. We failed to remove Ashy-tailed Swift from our own spreadsheet version of Clements Checklist, however (!); that error now is corrected. Last year we also advised that Chaetura andrei andrei was a synonym of Chaetura vauxi aphanes. That is true, but andrei is the senior synonym and aphanes is the junior synonym. Therefore, change Chaetura vauxi aphanes to Chaetura vauxi andrei.

Page 190, Alpine Swift Tachymarptis melba and Mottled Swift Tachymarptis aequatorialis
In accord with BOURC and NACC, remove both species from Tachymarptis and place them in the genus Apus; as a result,Tachymarptis no longer is recognized as a genus. Place Alpine Swift and Mottled Swift at the beginning of the genus Apus, between Schouteden’s Swift Schoutedenapus schoutedeni and Alexander’s Swift Apus alexandri.

[Note added 23 December 2009: We went to some trouble to sort out the new sequence of hummingbird genera, and to document these changes; but then we forgot to implement them in Clements Checklist 6.4. Therefore, these changes do not go into effect yet. We will implement the new sequence of hummingbird genera in a future Clements Checklist release.]

Pages 191-211, family Trochilidae (Hummingbirds)
In accord with SACC, the sequence of the genera of hummingbirds is revised. These changes are based on recent phylogenetic studies using DNA sequence data, and that included many (although not all!) genera of hummingbirds. The new sequence of genera in hummingbirds is:
Topaza
Florisuga
Eutoxeres
Ramphodon
Glaucis
Threnetes
Anopetia
Phaethornis
Doryfera
Schistes
Augastes
Colibri
Androdon
Heliactin
Heliothryx
Polytmus
Avocettula
Chrysolampis
Anthracothorax
Eulampis
Heliangelus
Sephanoides
Discosura
Lophornis
Phlogophilus
Adelomyia
Anthocephala
Aglaiocercus
Sappho
Polyonymus
Taphrolesbia
Oreotrochilus
Opisthoprora
Lesbia
Ramphomicron
Chalcostigma
Oxypogon
Oreonympha
Metallura
Haplophaedia
Eriocnemis
Loddigesia
Aglaeactis
Coeligena
Lafresnaya
Ensifera
Pterophanes
Boissoneaua
Ocreatus
Urochroa
Urosticte
Heliodoxa
Clytolaema
Patagona
Sternoclyta
Hylonympha
Eugenes
Heliomaster
Panterpe
Lampornis
Lamprolaima
Myrtis
Eulidia
Rhodopis
Thaumastura
Chaetocercus
Myrmia
Microstilbon
Doricha
Tilmatura
Calothorax
Calliphlox
Archilochus
Mellisuga
Calypte
Atthis
Selasphorus
Stellula
Chlorostilbon
Chlorestes
Cynanthus
Cyanophaia
Orthorhynchus
Klais
Abeillia
Stephanoxis
Phaeochroa
Campylopterus
Eupetomena
Chalybura
Thalurania
Eupherusa
Elvira
Microchera
Aphantochroa
Taphrospilus
Leucochloris
Leucippus
Amazilia
Chrysuronia
Goethalsia
Goldmania
Trochilus
Lepidopyga
Damophila
Hylocharis

Page 192, Long-billed Hermit Phaethornis longirostris
Previously the six subspecies of Long-billed Hermit were grouped into just two groups. The Long-billed Hermit (Central American) contained four subspecies, and the other two subspecies were included in the Long-billed Hermit (Mexican) group. We revise this treatment, and now recognize four groups. One subspecies (baroni) is removed from the Central American group and is the sole member of the Long-billed Hermit (Baron’s) group. Similarly, the Long-billed Hermit (Mexican) group is broken into two separate groups, as follows:
Long-billed Hermit (Jalisco) Phaethornis longirostris griseoventer
Long-billed Hermit (Mexican) Phaethornis longirostris mexicanus

Page 195, Black Jacobin Florisuga fuscus
In accord with SACC, change the spelling of the species name to fusca: Florisuga fusca.

Page 199, Gilded Sapphire Hylocharis chrysura
In accord with SACC, change the name of this species to Gilded Hummingbird.

Page 203, White-throated Mountain-gem Lampornis castaneoventris
Subspecies homogenes does not belong with this species; it should be listed under Purple-throated Mountain-Gem Lampornis calolaemus. The White-throated Mountain-gem contains two groups:
White-throated Mountain-gem (Blue-tailed), for subspecies castaneoventris; and
White-throated Mountain-gem (Gray-tailed), for subspecies cinereicauda.

Page 204, Chimborazo Hillstar Oreotrochilus chimborazo
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Ecuadorian Hillstar.

Page 209, Wedge-billed Hummingbird Augastes geoffroyi
In accord with SACC, remove this species from the genus Augastes and place it in the monotypic genus Schistes.

Pages 212-214, Trogons Trogonidae
As a result of a recent phylogeny of the family (R. Moyle, 2005, Phylogeny and biogeographical history of Trogoniformes, a pantropical bird order. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 84:725-388), the sequence of genera of trogons has been revised:
Euptilotis
Pharomachrus
Priotelus
Trogon
Apaloderma
Harpactes
In accord with SACC, the sequence of species within the genus Trogon is revised, and in addition, several species are split (see additional notes below). The new sequence of species within Trogon is:

–Lattice-tailed Trogon Trogon clathratus
–Slaty-tailed Trogon Trogon massena
–Blue-tailed Trogon Trogon comptus
–Ecuadorian Trogon Trogon mesurus
–Black-tailed Trogon Trogon melanurus
–Black-headed Trogon Trogon melanocephalus
–Citreoline Trogon Trogon citreolus
–White-tailed Trogon Trogon chionurus
–Green-backed Trogon Trogon viridis
–Baird’s Trogon Trogon bairdii
–Gartered Trogon Trogon caligatus
–Violaceus Trogon Trogon violaceus
–Blue-crowned Trogon Trogon curucui
–Surucua Trogon Trogon surrucura
–Black-throated Trogon Trogon rufus
–Elegant Trogon Trogon elegans
–Mountain Trogon Trogon mexicanus
–Orange-bellied Trogon Trogon aurantiiventris
–Collared Trogon Trogon collaris
–Masked Trogon Trogon personatus

Page 213, White-eyed Trogon Trogon comptus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Blue-tailed Trogon.

Page 213, White-tailed Trogon Trogon viridis
In accord with SACC, the White-tailed Trogon is split into two species:
White-tailed Trogon Trogon chionurus
Green-backed Trogon Trogon viridis (including the subspecies melanopterus).

Page 213, Violaceous Trogon Trogon violaceus
In accord with SACC, the Violaceous Trogon is split into two species:
Gartered Trogon Trogon caligatus (with subspecies braccatus and concinnus)
Violaceous Trogon Trogon violaceus (with subspecies ramonianus and crissalis)

Page 214, Black-tailed Trogon Trogon melanurus
In accord with SACC, the Black-tailed Trogon is split into two species:
Ecuadorian Trogon Trogon mesurus
Black-tailed Trogon Trogon melanurus (with subspecies macroura, eumophorus, and occidentalis).

Page 227, Rufous-crowned Roller Coracias noevius
Correct the spelling of the species name to naevius.

Page 235, Swallow-wing Chelidoptera tenebrosa
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Swallow-winged Puffbird.

Page 240, Emerald Toucanet Aulacorhynchus prasinus caeruleogularis
Correct the range description to: Highlands of w Panama (Chiriquí and Veraguas)

Page 245, Guianan Piculet Picumnus minutissimus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Arrowhead Piculet.

Page 248, Cuban Woodpecker Xiphidiopicus percussus
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Cuban Green Woodpecker.

Page 252, Checkered Woodpecker Picoides mixtus and Striped Woodpecker Picoides lignarius
In accord with SACC, both of these species are transferred to the genus Veniliornis.

Pages 252-254, genus Veniliornis
In accord with SACC, change the linear sequence of species in this genus as follows:
–Red-rumped Woodpecker Veniliornis kirkii
–Golden-collared Woodpecker Veniliornis cassini
–White-spotted Woodpecker Veniliornis spilogaster
–Checkered Woodpecker Veniliornis mixtus
–Striped Woodpecker Veniliornis lignarius
–Blood-colored Woodpecker Veniliornis sanguineus
–Little Woodpecker Veniliornis passerinus
–Dot-fronted Woodpecker Veniliornis frontalis
–Scarlet-backed Woodpecker Veniliornis callonotus
–Yellow-vented Woodpecker Veniliornis dignus
–Bar-bellied Woodpecker Veniliornis nigriceps
–Red-stained Woodpecker Veniliornis affinis
–Choco Woodpecker Veniliornis chocoensis
—¬†Yellow-eared Woodpecker Veniliornis maculifrons

Page 253, Smoky-brown Woodpecker Veniliornis fumigatus
Recent research shows that this species is not a member of the genus Veniliornis (see SACC Proposal 263), but instead is more closely related to some species in the genus Picoides. Position the Smoky-brown Woodpecker Picoides fumigatus immediately before Hairy Woodpecker Picoides villosus.

Page 254, Yellow-browed Woodpecker Piculus aurulentus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to White-browed Woodpecker.

Page 255, Spot-breasted Woodpecker Colaptes punctigula
Correct the distribution of subspecies ujhelyii to ” E Panama (Dari√©n) and n Colombia.”

Page 255, Northern Flicker Colaptes auratus
An extinct, endemic Guadalupe Island subspecies was omitted from earlier editions of the Clements Checklist. This subspecies is a member of Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) group.
Northern Flicker Colaptes auratus rufipileus  Formerly Guadalupe Island, Mexico. Extinct; last recorded 1906.

Page 256, Scaly-breasted Woodpecker Celeus grammicus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Scale-breasted Woodpecker.

Page 268, Scale-throated Earthcreeper Upucerthia dumetaria
In accord with SACC, subspecies saturatior is split as a separate species, Patagonian Forest Earthcreeper Upucerthia saturatior. Place this species before Scale-throated Earthcreeper.

Page 269, Comechingones Cinclodes Cinclodes comechingonus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Cordoba Cinclodes.

Page 270, Bay Hornero Furnarius torridus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Pale-billed Hornero.

Page 271, Itatiaia Thistletail Oreophylax moreirae
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Itatiaia Spinetail.

Page 273, Black-faced Spinetail Synallaxis tithys
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Blackish-headed Spinetail.

Page 273, Maranon Spinetail Synallaxis maranonica
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Mara√Īon Spinetail.

Page 274, Sulphur-bearded Spinetail Cranioleuca sulphurifera
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Sulphur-throated Spinetail.

Page 277, Red-eyed Thornbird Phacellodomus erythrophthalmus
In accord with SACC Proposal 371 and SACC Proposal 396, the two subspecies of this species each are elevated to species rank, as follows:
Orange-eyed Thornbird Phacellodomus erythrophthalmus
Orange-breasted Thornbird Phacellodomus ferrugineigula

Page 279, Gray-crested Cacholote Pseudoseisura unirufa
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Rufous Cacholote.

Page 281, White-throated Foliage-gleaner Automolus roraimae
In accord with SACC, transfer this species to the genus Syndactyla. Place this species at the end of the genus, immediately following Russet-mantled Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla dimidiata.

Page 281, Buff-throated Treehunter Thripadectes scrutator
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Rufous-backed Treehunter.

Page 281, White-eyed Foliage-gleaner Automolus leucophthalmus
In accord with SACC, subspecies lammi is split as a separate species:
Pernambuco Foliage-gleaner Automolus lammi.

Page 282, Ruddy Foliage-gleaner Automolus rubiginosus
In accord with SACC, subspecies rufipectus is split as a separate species: Santa Marta Foliage-gleaner Automolus rufipectus. This species is placed at the end of the genus Automolus, immediately after Chestnut-crowned Foliage-gleaner Automolus rufipileatus.

Page 286, Hoffmann’s Woodcreeper Dendrocolaptes hoffmannsi
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Hoffmanns’s Woodcreeper.

Page 294, Speckled Antshrike Xenornis setifrons
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Spiny-faced Antshrike.

Page 297, Parana Antwren Formicivora acutirostris
In accord with SACC, remove this antbird from the genus Formicivora, and place it in the genus Stymphalornis; it follows immediately after the genus Formicivora.

Page 300, Roraiman Antbird Percnostola saturata
Last year we moved four species of Percnostola to the genus Schistocichla, in accord with SACC, but in our 2008 Updates and Corrections, we acknowledged this revision for only three species of Percnostola. The correct scientific name for Roraiman Antbird is Schistocichla saturata.

Page 304, Brazilian Antthrush Chamaeza ruficauda
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Rufous-tailed Antthrush.

Page 305, Fulvous-bellied Antpitta Hylopezus dives
In accord with NACC and SACC, change the English name of this species to Thicket Antpitta.

Page 309, Rusty-belted Tapaculo Liosceles thoracicus and Ocellated Tapaculo Acropternis orthonyx
In accord with SACC, the sequence of genera with the tapaculos (Rhinocryptidae) is revised. Insert Liosceles and Acropternis into a position between the genera Scelorchilus and Rhinocrypta.

Page 309, Narino Tapaculo Scytalopus vicinior
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Nari√Īo Tapaculo.

Page 310, Spillman’s Tapaculo Scytalopus spillmanni
Correct the spelling of the English name of this species to Spillmann’s Tapaculo.

Page 310, Lara Tapaculo Scytalopus fuscicauda
In accord with SACC, this species is lumped with Merida Tapaculo, as Scytalopus meridanus fuscicauda.

Page 311, Melanopareidae (Crescentchests)
Correct the spelling of Melanopareidae to Melanopareiidae.

Page 311, Maranon Crescentchest Melanopareia maranonica
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Mara√Īon Crescentchest.

Page 312, Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris
Page 313, Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata
Remove these species from Tyranni Incertae Sedis, and return them to the Cotingidae; provisionally we place them at the end of Cotingidae, immediately following Black-faced Cotinga.

Page 318, Wing-barred Piprites Piprites chloris
Gray-headed Piprites Piprites griseiceps
Black-capped Piprites Piprites pileata
Remove these species from Tyranni Incertae Sedis, and return them to the Pipridae; provisionally we place them at the end of Pipridae, immediately following Round-tailed Manakin.

Page 318, Rough-legged Tyrannulet (White-fronted) Phyllomyias burmeisteri leucogonys
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to leucogenys.

Page 322, Cocos Island Flycatcher Nesotriccus ridgwayi
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Cocos Flycatcher.

Page 325, Variegated Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus poecilotis, Chapman’s Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus chapmani, Marble-faced Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus ophthalmicus, Venezuelan Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus venezuelanus, Antioquia Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus lanyoni, Spectacled Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus orbitalis, and Southern Bristle-Tyrant Pogonotriccus eximius
In accord with SACC, transfer all of these species to the genus Phylloscartes.

Page 326, Many-colored Rush-Tyrant Tachuris rubrigastra
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Many-colored Rush Tyrant.

Page 328, Fork-tailed Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus furcatus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant.

Page 336, Olive-tufted Flycatcher Mitrephanes olivaceus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Olive Flycatcher.

Page 338, Drab Water-Tyrant Ochthornis littoralis
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Drab Water Tyrant.

Page 342, Crowned Slaty-Flycatcher Empidonomus aurantioatrocristatus
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Crowned Slaty Flycatcher.

Page 346, Green-backed Becard Pachyramphus viridis and Yellow-cheeked Becard Pachyramphus xanthogenys
In accord with SACC, these two species are lumped as Green-backed Becard Pachyramphus viridis. This merger was made last year in the spreadsheet, but we failed to document the change in the 2008 Updates and Corrections. Each former species retains its identity as the groups:
–Green-backed Becard (Green-backed)¬† Pachyramphus viridis viridis/griseigularis
–Green-backed Becard (Yellow-cheeked)¬† Pachyramphus viridis xanthogenys/peruanus

Page 351, Algulhas Lark Certhilauda brevirostris
Correct the spelling of the English name to Agulhas Lark.

Page 357, Eurasian Skylark Alauda arvensis
In accord with NACC and BOURC, change the English name of this species to Sky Lark.

Page 362, House Martin Delichon urbicum
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Common House-Martin.

Page 362, Asian Martin Delichon dasypus
Change the English name of this species to Asian House-Martin.

Page 362, Nepal Martin Delichon nipalense
Change the English name of this species to Nepal House-Martin.

Page 363, African Pipit Anthus cinnamomeus
Correct the spelling of subspecies bocagei to bocagii.

Page 372, Lesser Cuckoo-shrike Coracina fimbriata
Correct the spelling of subspecies schierbrandii to schierbrandi (that is, the subspecies name should end in only one ‚Äú-i.‚ÄĚ).
Reference:
Dickinson, E. C., R. W. R. J. Dekker, S. Eck, and S. Somadikarta. 2002. Systematic notes on Asian birds. 23. Types of the Campephagidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 340.

Page 381, Long-billed Greenbul Phyllastrephus madagascariensis, Spectacled Greenbul Phyllastrephus zosterops, Appert’s Greenbul Phyllastrephus apperti, Dusky Greenbul Phyllastrephus tenebrosus, and Gray-crowned Greenbul Phyllastrephus cinereiceps
These five species have been classified in the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae), in the same genus as a large African radiation of bulbuls. Recent research demonstrates that these five species are not members of the genus Phyllastrephus, indeed that they are not bulbuls at all; and furthermore, that the Long-billed Greenbul is not in the same genus as the four other species. Instead, all of these species, together with several other genera, including some that previously were classified among the babblers (Timaliidae) and the Old World warblers (Sylviidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. The Long-billed Greenbul changes its English name to Long-billed Bernieria, and the genus changes to Bernieria. The four other species are placed in the genus Xanthomixis, and the English name of each species changes from “greenbul” to “tetraka.” Position the Bernieridae immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 382, Nicators (Nicator)
The three species of nicator (Nicator) long have been included in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). Recent research demonstrates that these three species in fact are not bulbuls at all, and constitute a new family, Nicatoridae. Position the Nicatoridae between the Bearded Reedling (Panuridae) and the larks (Alaudidae).
References:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 386, Greater Green Leafbird Chloropsis sonnerati parvirostris
This subspecies no longer is recognized as distinct; it is merged with subspecies zosterops.
Wells, D.R., E. C. Dickinson, and R. W. R. J. Dekker. 2003. A preliminary review of the Chloropseidae and Irenidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 344:25-42.

Page 386, Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis cochinchinensis
Add a new species of leafbird, Bornean Leafbird Chloropsis kinabaluensis, immediately following the Blue-winged Leafbird. The range is “upland forests of n Borneo.”
This taxon, previously considered a subspecies of Blue-winged Leafbird, was overlooked in earlier editions of the Clements Checklist. Following Wells et al. (2003), it now is recognized as a separate species.
Reference:
Wells, D.R., E. C. Dickinson, and R. W. R. J. Dekker. 2003. A preliminary review of the Chloropseidae and Irenidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 344:25-42.

Page 386, Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis cochinchinensis jerdoni
This subspecies now is recognized as a separate species, Jerdon’s Leafbird Chloropsis jerdoni, following Wells et al. (2003). Place Jerdon’s Leafbird immediately following Bornean Leafbird and Blue-winged Leafbird.
Reference:
Wells, D.R., E. C. Dickinson, and R. W. R. J. Dekker. 2003. A preliminary review of the Chloropseidae and Irenidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 344:25-42.

Page 386, Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis cochinchinensis
Among the nine remaining subspecies of Blue-winged Leafbird are the following:
Chloropsis cochinchinensis cochinchinensis SE Thailand and s Indochina
Chloropsis cochinchinensis nigricollis Java
Revise these to:
Chloropsis cochinchinensis auropectus SE Thailand and s Indochina
Chloropsis cochinchinensis cochinchinensis Java
Reference:
Wells, D.R., E. C. Dickinson, and R. W. R. J. Dekker. 2003. A preliminary review of the Chloropseidae and Irenidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 344:25-42.

Page 386, Golden-fronted Leafbird Chloropsis aurifrons media
This subspecies now is recognized as a separate species, Sumatran Leafbird Chloropsis media, following Wells et al. (2003). Place Sumatran Leafbird immediately following Golden-fronted Leafbird.
Reference:
Wells, D.R., E. C. Dickinson, and R. W. R. J. Dekker. 2003. A preliminary review of the Chloropseidae and Irenidae. Zoologische Verhandelingen 344:25-42.

Page 398, Family Mimidae (Mockingbirds and Thrashers)
In accord with a series of decisions by SACC, the genus Nesomimus, for the mockingbirds of the Galapagos Islands, is lumped with Mimus, the mainland mockingbirds; and the English names of the Galapagos mockingbirds are changed. The new English and scientific names are as follows:
–Galapagos Mockingbird Mimus parvulus
–Floreana Mockingbird Mimus trifasciatus
–Espa√Īola Mockingbird Mimus macdonaldi
–San Cristobal Mockingbird Mimus melanotis

Page 395, Paramo Wren Cistothorus meridae
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Merida Wren.

Page 401, genera Pseudocossyphus and Monticola (Turdidae)
Previously, Clements Checklist recognized five taxa ‚Äď three species and two additional subspecies ‚Äď in Pseudocossyphus, a genus endemic to Madagascar. Recent research demonstrates that almost all aspects of this taxonomy and nomenclature are incorrect. First, Pseudocossyphus is not a separate genus, but instead these species should be included in the widespread genus of rock-thrushes, Monticola. One of the subspecies, erythronotus, should be elevated to species status; another subspecies, salomensoni, should not be recognized at all. The ending of one species name (imerinus) is changed when the species is placed in Monticola (to imerina). Finally, the ranges given for several of these thrushes are inaccurate. The revised arrangement, and distributions, is as follows:
–Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush Monticola erythronotus¬†Highland forest of n Madagascar (Montagne d’Ambre)
–Forest Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola sharpei¬†Humid forest in e-c Madagascar
–Benson’s Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola bensoni¬†Montane rocky areas of s-c Madagascar
–Littoral Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola imerina¬†Arid littoral of sw Madagascar
Similar research across the entire genus Monticola indicates that the sequence of species should be:
–Little Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola rufocinereus
–Blue-capped Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola cinclorhynchus
–White-throated Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola gularis
–Chestnut-bellied Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola rufiventris
–Miombo Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola angolensis
–Cape Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola rupestris
–Rufous-tailed Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola saxatilis
–Blue Rock Thrush¬†Monticola solitarius
–Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush Monticola erythronotus
–Forest Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola sharpei
–Benson’s Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola bensoni
–Littoral Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola imerina
–Sentinel Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola explorator
–Short-toed Rock-Thrush¬†Monticola brevipes
References:
Goodman, S. M., and L. A. Weigt. 2002. The generic and species relationships of the reputed endemic Malagasy genus Pseudocossyphus (family Turdidae). Ostrich 73: 26-35.
Outlaw, R. K., G. Voelker, and D. C. Outlaw. 2007. Molecular systematic and historical biogeography of
the rock-thrushes (Muscicapidae: Monticola). Auk 124: 561-577.

Page 404, Russet-tailed Thrush Zoothera heinei
This species earlier was included within the Scaly Thrush (Zoothera dauma), but was separated as a species in the fourth edition of Clements Checklist (1991). In the process, several subspecies that belong with heinei were “lost.” To correct this oversight, insert the following four subspecies and associated range statements:
Zoothera heinei papuensis highlands of New Guinea
Zoothera heinei eichhorni St. Matthias I. (Bismarck Archipelago)
Zoothera heinei choiseuli Choiseul I., Solomon Is.
Zoothera heinei heinei E Australia (Clarke Range, Queensland to about Sydney, NSW)

Page 410, Dark-throated Thrush Turdus ruficollis
In accord with the BOURC, the two distinctive subspecies of the Dark-throated Thrush each are recognized as a separate species:
Black-throated Thrush Turdus atrogularis
Red-throated Thrush Turdus ruficollis
Reference:
Knox, A. G., J. M. Colinson, D. T. Parkin, G. Sangser, and L. Svensson. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: fifth report. Ibis 150: 833-835.

Page 410, Dusky Thrush Turdus naumanni
In accord with the BOURC, the two distinctive subspecies of the Dusky Thrush each are recognized as a separate species:
Dusky Thrush Turdus eunomus
Naumann’s Thrush Turdus naumanni
Reference:
Knox, A. G., J. M. Colinson, D. T. Parkin, G. Sangser, and L. Svensson. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: fifth report. Ibis 150: 833-835.

Page 411, Maranon Thrush Turdus maranonica
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Mara√Īon Thrush.

Page 412, Spectacled Thrush Turdus nudigenis
In accord with SACC, subspecies maculirostris is elevated to species status as Ecuadorian Thrush Turdus maculirostris.

Pages 414-425, cisticolas and allies (Cisticolidae)
As is detailed elsewhere in these updates, several genera are transferred to the cisticola family. In addition, the sequence of genera in the Cisticolidae is revised, as follows:

Neomixis
Apalis
Camaroptera
Urorhipis
Calamonastes
Euryptila
Schistolais
Artisornis
Malcorus
Drymocichla
Urolais
Spiloptila
Cisticola
Incana
Scotocerca
Hypergerus
Eminia
Bathmocercus
Phyllolais
Orthotomus
Prinia
Eremomela

Page 419, White-browed Chinese Warbler Rhopophilus pekinensis
This species had been included in the cisticola family (Cisticolidae), but recent research indicates that instead it is an Old World warbler (Sylviidae). Position it immediately following the genus Chrysomma.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 420, Gray-breasted Prinia Prinia hodgsonii leggei
Correct the name of this subspecies to pectoralis. The name leggei applies only when the genus Malcorus is included within the genus Prinia; as Clements Checklist recognizes both Malcorus and Prinia as separate genera, there is no conflict over the name pectoralis.
Reference:
Watson, G. E., M. A. Traylor, Jr,, and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae (Old World warblers). Pages 3-294 in Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. (E. Mayr and G. W. Cottrell, editors). Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University.

Pages 425-426, genera Tesia, Urosphena, and Cettia (Sylviidae)
The 24 species in these three genera traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers after all; instead, these genera, in combination with several other genera (Abroscopus, Tickellia, and Phyllergates), form a new family, the bush-warblers and allies (Cettiidae). Position the Cettidae immediately following the Penduline Tits (Remizidae).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Pages 426-428, genera Bradypterus and Dromaeocercus (Sylviidae)
These two genera traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that Bradypterus and Dromaeocercus, together with several other genera (Locustella, Megalurus, Cincloramphus, Eremiornis, Buettikoferella, Megalurulus, Trichocichla, Chaetornis, and Schoenicola), constitute a separate family, grassbirds and allies (Megaluridae). The position of the Megaluridae is immediately preceding Black-capped
Donacobius, Donacobiidae.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny.

Page 428, genus Bathmocercus (Sylviidae)
These three species have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers, but instead are members of the cisticola family (Cisticolidae). Position the genus Bathmocercus immediately after the genus Eminia.
Reference:
Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

Page 428, brush-warblers (Nesillas)
The brush-warblers traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers after all; instead, these genera, in combination with several other genera (Chloropeta, Hippolais, and Acrocephalus), form a new family, the reed-warblers and allies (Acrocephalidae). Position the Acrocephalidae immediately following the leaf-warblers (Phylloscopidae). The sequence of genera in the Acrocephalidae is Nesillas, Chloropeta, Hippolais, and Acrocephalus.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 428, Madagascar Brush-Warbler (Nesillas typica)
The subspecies lantzii is elevated to species status, as Subdesert Brush-Warbler Nesillas lantzii, following Schulenberg et al. 1993 (Genetic variation in two subspecies of Nesillas typica (Sylviinae) in south-east Madagascar. Pages 173-179 in: Wilson, R. T. (editor), Proceedings of the Eighth Pan-African Ornithological Congress. Annales Mus√©e Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (Zoologie) 268).

Page 428, Thamnornis Thamnornis chloropetoides
This species has been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that it is not an Old World warbler at all. Instead the Thamnornis, together with several other genera, including some that previously were classified among the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and the babblers (Timaliidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. Position the Bernieridae immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 429, genus Locustella (Sylviidae)
This genus traditionally has been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that Locustella warblers, together with several other genera (Bradypterus, Dromaeocercus, Megalurus, Cincloramphus, Eremiornis, Buettikoferella, Megalurulus, Trichocichla, Chaetornis, and Schoenicola), constitute a separate family, grassbirds and allies (Megaluridae). The position of the Megaluridae is immediately preceding Black-capped
Donacobius, Donacobiidae.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny.

Page 429, Grasshopper Warbler Locustella naevia
Change the English name of this species to Common Grasshopper-Warbler; the BOURC uses a similar name, Common Grasshopper Warbler.

Page 429, Pallas’s Warbler Locustella certhiola
Change the English name of this species to Pallas’s Grasshopper-Warbler; the BOURC uses a similar name, Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler.

Page 429, Middendorff’s Warbler Locustella ochotensis
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Middendorff’s Grasshopper-Warbler.

Pages 429-432, genera Acrocephalus, Hippolais and Chloropeta
These species traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers after all; instead, these genera, in combination with another genus (Nesillas), form a new family, the reed-warblers and allies (Acrocephalidae). Position the Acrocephalidae immediately following the leaf-warblers (Phylloscopidae). The sequence of genera in the Acrocephalidae is Nesillas, Chloropeta, Hippolais, and Acrocephalus.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 432, Buff-bellied Warbler Phyllolais pulchella
This species has been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that the Buff-bellied Warbler is not an Old World warbler, but instead is a member of the cisticola family (Cisticolidae). Position the genus Phyllolais immediately after the genus Bathmocercus.
Reference:
Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

Page 432, African Tailorbird Orthotomus metopias and Long-billed Tailorbird Orthotomus moreaui
These two species have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these two tailorbirds are not Old World warblers, but instead are members of the cisticola family (Cisticolidae). Furthermore, these two tailorbirds have been shown to belong to a different genus than the remaining tailorbirds. Therefore, change the generic name of both to Artisornis. Position the genus Artisornis immediately after the genus Schistolais.
Reference:
Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

Page 432, Mountain Tailorbird Orthotomus cuculatus
This species traditionally has been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that the Mountain Tailorbird is not an Old World warbler after all; instead, it, in combination with several other genera (Tesia, Urosphena, Cettia, Abroscopus and Tickellia), form a new family, the bush-warblers and allies (Cettiidae). Position the Cettidae immediately following the Penduline Tits (Remizidae).
Since other species of Orthotomus are not members of Cettiidae, the Mountain Tailorbird needs to be placed in a separate genus. The appropriate name appears to be Phyllergates; therefore, the Mountain Tailorbird not only moves to Cettidae, but becomes known as Phyllergates cucullatus. Presumably the closely related Rufous-headed Tailorbird (Orthotomus heterolaemus) also is a bush-warbler, and so is transferred to the genus Phyllergates.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397. (systematics)
Watson, G. E., M. A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae (Old World warblers). Pages 3-294 in Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. (E. Mayr and G. W. Cottrell, editors). Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. (nomenclature)

Page 433, tailorbirds Orthotomus species
The remaining eleven species of Orthotomus have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these tailorbirds are not Old World warblers, but instead are members of the cisticola family (Cisticolidae). Position these species immediately following the genus Phyllolais.
Reference:
Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

Page 434, genus Eremomela (Sylviidae)
These eleven species have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that the eremomelas are not Old World warblers, but instead are members of the cisticola family (Cisticolidae). Position these species immediately following the genus Prinia.
Reference:
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 434, Rand’s Warbler Randia pseudozosterops
This species has been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that a mixture of Malagasy endemics, including some that previously were classified among the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and the babblers (Timaliidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. Rand’s Warbler is suspected of belonging to the Bernieridae as well. Position the Bernieridae immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 434-435, newtonias (Newtonia)
These four species have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that they may be vangas (Vangidae). Position the genus Newtonia immediately following the genus Tylas.
Reference:
Yamagishi, S., M. Honda, K. Eguchi, and R. Thorstrom. 2001. Extreme endemic radiation of the Malagasy vangas (Aves: Passeriformes). Journal of Molecular Evolution 53:39‚Äď46.

Page 435, Cryptic Warbler Cryptosylvicola randriansoloi
Correct the spelling of the species name to randrianasoloi (add an ‘a’ before ‘soloi’).
This recently-described species initially was classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that it is not an Old World warbler. Instead the Cryptic Warbler, together with several other genera, including some that previously were classified among the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and the babblers (Timaliidae) and the Old World warblers (Sylviidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. Position the Bernieridae immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 436, Leptopoecile (Sylviidae)
These two species have been classified in the family of Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that instead the genus Leptopoecile is a member of the long-tailed tits (Aegithalidae). Position Leptopoecile at the beginning of the Aegithalidae, just before the Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 436, White-browed Tit-Warbler Leptopoecile sophiae
Due to a new understanding of the gender of the genus name Leptopoecile (David, N., and M. Gosselin. 2008. Grammatical gender of Poecile and Leptopoecile. Dutch Birding 30:19), revise the spelling of the subspecies Leptopoecile sophiae obscura to Leptopoecile sophiae obscurus.

Pages 436-440, genera Phylloscopus and Seicercus (Sylviidae)
These 67 species have been classified in the family of Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that instead these two genera together constitute a new family, the leaf warblers (Phylloscopidae). Position Phylloscopidae immediately following the kinglets (Regulidae).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 438, Lemon-rumped Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Pallas’s Leaf-Warbler; the BOURC uses a similar name, Pallas’s Leaf Warbler.

Page 438, Greenish Warbler Phylloscopus trochiloides
In accord with the BOURC, the Greenish Warbler is divided into two species:
Green Warbler Phylloscopus nitidus (monotypic)
Greenish Warbler Phylloscopus trochiloides (includes all remaining subspecies: trochiloides, ludlowi, obscuratus, plumbeitarsus, and viridianus)
Reference:
Knox, A. G., J. M. Colinson, D. T. Parkin, G. Sangser, and L. Svensson. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: fifth report. Ibis 150: 833-835.

Pages 440-441, genera Abroscopus and Tickellia (Sylviidae)
The four species in these two genera traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these species are not Old World warblers after all; instead, these genera, in combination with several other genera (Tesia, Urosphena, Cettia, and Phyllergates), form a new family, the bush-warblers and allies (Cettiidae). Position the Cettidae immediately following the Penduline Tits (Remizidae).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.

Page 441, genus Hyliota (Sylviidae)
The four species of hyliota have been included within the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that these four species not only are not Old World warblers, but also can not be assigned to any other family. Therefore, the hyliotas are recognized as a new family, the hyliotas (Hyliotidae). Position the Hyliotidae immediately following the fairy-bluebirds (Irenidae).
Reference:
Fuchs, J., J. Fjeldså, R.C.K. Bowie, G. Voelker, and E. Pasquet. 2006. The African warbler genus Hyliota as a lost lineage in the oscine songbird tree: molecular support for an African origin of the Passerida. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 39: 39: 186-197.

Pages 441-442, genera Megalurus, Cincloramphus, Eremiornis, Buettikoferella, Megalurulus, Trichocichla, Chaetornis, and Schoenicola
These eight genera traditionally have been classified in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Recent research demonstrates that three of these genera (Megalurus, Cincloramphus, and Schoenicola), together with several other genera (Bradypterus, Dromaeocercus, and Locustella), constitute a separate family, grassbirds and allies (Megaluridae). The genera Eremiornis, Buettikoferella, Megalurulus, Trichocichla, and Chaetornis have not been shown to be members of the Megaluridae, but tentatively are included in that family. The position of the Megaluridae is immediately preceding Black-capped Donacobius, Donacobiidae.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Johansson, U.S., Bowie, R.C.K. & Fjeldså, J. 2008. Phylogenetic relationships within Passerida (Aves: Passeriformes): a review and a new molecular phylogeny based on three nuclear intron markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 858-876.
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.

Page 442, Rufous-rumped Grassbird Graminicola bengalensis
The grassbird has been included in the Old World warblers (Sylviidae), but recent research indicates that instead this species as a member of the babbler family (Timaliidae). Position the grassbird immediately following the wren-babblers (Ptilocichla).
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 450, Fairy Flycatcher (Stenostira scita)
This species has been classified as a member of the Old World flycatchers (Muscicapidae), but recent research demonstrates that it is not related to the Muscicapidae. Instead, this species, together with two other genera (Elminia and Culicicapa), forms a new family, fairy flycatchers (Stenostiridae). Position the Stenostiridae immediately following the swallows (Hirundinidae).
Reference:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.

Page 452, Island Flycatcher Eumyias panayensis sanghirensis
Delete this subspecies. We have been unable to confirm that such a subspecies exists, or even that the Island Flycatcher occurs on any of the islands specified in the range of this subspecies (Talaud Islands, Sangihe, Siau, Tahulandang, Ruang and Biaro is.).

Page 454, canary-flycatchers (Culicicapa)
These two species have been classified as members of the Old World flycatchers (Muscicapidae), but recent research demonstrates that they are not related to the Muscicapidae. Instead, these species, together with the Fairy Flycatcher (Stenostira scita) and the blue-flycatchers and the crested-flycatchers (Elminia), form a new family, fairy flycatchers (Stenostiridae). Position the Stenostiridae immediately following the swallows (Hirundinidae).
Reference:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.

Page 456, Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus
In accord with the BOURC, elevate subspecies rufilatus to species status. The subspecies pallidior is a synonym of rufilatus, and is no longer recognized. Therefore the arrangement is:
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus
Himalayan Bluetail Tarsiger rufilatus
Also, revise the range statement of Red-flanked Bluetail to: n Russia to n Japan and Afghanistan to Nepal; winters to s China, Gr. Sundas, Myanmar, Thailand and Laos
Reference:
Knox, A. G., J. M. Colinson, D. T. Parkin, G. Sangser, and L. Svensson. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: fifth report. Ibis 150: 833-835.

Page 466, Ward’s Flycatcher (Pseudobias wardi)
This monotypic genus traditionally was classified as the sole Malagasy representative of the Wattle-eyes (Platysteiridae) of Africa. Recent research shows, however, that instead the Ward’s Flycatcher is a Vanga (Vangidae). Position this species at the end of the Vangidae, following the three species of Xenopirostris.
References:
Schulenberg, T.S. 2003. The radiations of passerine birds of Madagascar. Pages 1130-1134 in S.M. Goodman and J.P. Benstead (editors), The natural history of Madagascar. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
Fuchs, J., R.C.K. Bowie, J. Fjeldså, and E. Pasquet. 2004. Phylogenetic relationships of the African bush-shrikes and helmet-shrikes (Passeriformes: Malaconotidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 33: 428-439.

Page 469, Chestnut-bellied Fantail Rhipidura hyperythra mulleri
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to muelleri.

Page 471, Rufous Fantail Rhipidura rufifrons kubaryi
Delete this subspecies; it is the same as Pohnpei Fantail Rhipidura kubaryi. This correction was made in the 2008 Clements Checklist spreadsheet, but was not noted in the online “Updates and Corrections.”

Page 472, blue-flycatchers and crested-flycatchers (Elminia)
These species have been classified as members of the monarch flycatchers (Monarchidae), but recent research demonstrates that they are not related to the Monarchidae. Instead, these species, together with the Fairy Flycatcher (Stenostira scita) and the canary-flycatchers (Culicicapa), form a new family, fairy flycatchers (Stenostiridae). Position the Stenostiridae immediately following the swallows (Hirundinidae).
Reference:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.

Page 474, Asian Paradise-Flycatcher Terpsiphone paradisi myanmare
Correct the subspecies name to burmae.

Page 478, Moluccan Flycatcher Myiagra galeata seramensis
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to seranensis.

Page 479, Boatbills (Machaerirhynchus)
The two species of boatbills (Machaerirhynchus) previously were considered to be members of the Monarch Flycatchers (Monarchidae). Recent research demonstrates that the genus Machaerirhynchus is not a monarch flycatcher, but instead should be recognized as a separate family, Machaerirhynchidae. Position the Boatbills (Machaerirhynchidae) following the Bushshrikes and Allies (Malaconotidae).
Reference:
Norman, J. A., P. G.P. Ericson, K. A. J√łnsson, J. Fjelds√•, and L. Christidis. 2009. A multi-gene phylogeny reveals novel relationships for aberrant genera of Australo-Papuan core Corvoidea and polyphyly of the Pachycephalidae and Psophodidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 52: 488‚Äď497.

Page 481, White-browed Robin Poecilodryas superciliosa cervviniventris
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to cerviniventris.

Page 483, Olive-flanked Whistler Hylocitrea bonensis
The Olive-flanked Whistler has been classified with the whistlers and allies (Pachycephalidae). Recent research demonstrates that this species is not a whistler, but instead should be recognized as a separate family, Hylocitreidae, which is close to the waxwings and related families. Position the Hylocitreidae immediately following the Palmchat (Dulidae).
Reference:
Spellman, G.M., A.C., R.G. Moyle, K.W. and F.K. Barker. 2008. Clarifying the systematics of an enigmatic avian lineage: What is a bombycillid? Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 49:1036-1040.

Page 495, Rockjumpers (Chaetops)
The three species of rockjumpers (Chaetops) traditionally have been classified as babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research instead demonstrates that the rockjumpers are not babblers at all, and should be classified as a separate family, Chaetopidae. Position the rockjumpers (Chaetopidae) immediately following the rockfowl (Picathartidae).
Reference:
Beresford, P., F.K. Barker, P.G. Ryan, and T.M. Crowe. 2005. African endemics span the tree of songbirds Passeri): molecular systematics of several evolutionary ‘enigmas’. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 272: 849-858.

Page 499, Common Jery Neomixis tenella, Green Jery Neomixis viridis, and Stripe-throated Jery Neomixis striatigula
These three species of jery traditionally have been classified as babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research indicates that these species are not babblers at all, but instead belong in the cisticolas and allies (Cisticolidae). Place the genus Neomixis at the beginning of the Cisticolidae.
Reference:
Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

Page 499, Wedge-tailed Jery Hartertula flavoviridis
This species has been classified in the babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research demonstrates that it is not a babbler. Instead the Wedge-tailed Jery, together with several other genera, including some that previously were classified among the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and the Old World warblers (Sylviidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. Position the Bernieridae immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 503, genus Chrysomma (Timaliidae)
These three species have been classified in the babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research indicates that they not are babblers, but belong with the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Position the genus Chrysomma immediately following the genus Parophasma.
Reference:
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 509, Abyssinian Catbird Parophasma galinieri
This species has been classified in the babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research indicates that it is not a babbler, but belongs with the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Position the Abyssinian Catbird at the beginning of the Sylviidae.
Reference:
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 510, Fire-tailed Myzornis Myzornis pyrrhoura
This species has been classified in the babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research indicates that it is not a babbler, but belongs with the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Position the Fire-tailed Myzornis immediately following the genus Parophasma.
Reference:
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 511, White-throated Oxylabes Oxylabes madagascariensis and Yellow-browed Oxylabes Crossleyia xanthophrys
These two genera have been classified in the babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research demonstrates that they are not babblers; instead they, together with several other genera, including some that previously were classified among the bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and the Old World warblers (Sylviidae), form a separate family. This family is the Bernieridae, the Malagasy Warblers. Position the Malagasy warblers immediately following Donacobius (Donacobiidae). The sequence of genera within the Bernieridae is Oxylabes, Bernieria, Cryptosylvicola, Hartertula, Thamnornis, Xanthomixis, Crossleyia¬ł and Randia.
Reference:
Cibois, A., B. Slikas, T. S. Schulenberg, and E. Pasquet. 2001. An endemic radiation of Malagasy songbirds is revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Evolution 55:1198-1206.

Page 511, Crossley’s Babbler (Mystacornis crossleyi)
This species traditionally has been classified among the Babblers (Timaliidae). Recent research shows instead that this species is a vanga (Vangidae). Position this species at the end of the vangas.
Reference:
Johansson, U. S., R. C. K. Bowie, S. J. Hackett, and T. S. Schulenberg. 2008. The phylogenetic affinities of Crossley’s Babbler (Mystacornis crossleyi): adding a new niche to the vanga radiation of Madagascar. Biology Letters 4: 677-680.

Page 511, Bearded Reedling (Panurus biarmicus)
This species recently has been classified among the parrotbills (Paradoxornithidae), but recent research demonstrates that it is not a parrotbill. Instead, the Bearded Reedling now constitutes a new family, the Panuridae. Position the Panuridae immediately following the Rail-babbler and Ifrita (Eupetidae).
Reference:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.

Pages 511-513, genera Conostoma and Paradoxornis (Paradoxornithidae)
These two genera, the parrotbills, have been the core members of the parrotbill family (Paradoxornithidae). Recent research demonstrates instead that the parrotbills are embedded within the Old World warblers (Sylviidae). Position the genera Conostoma and Paradoxornis immediately following the genus Rhopophilus. Therefore, Paradoxornithidae no longer is recognized as a family in Clements Checklist.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Pages 513-514, Whipbirds and Quail-thrushes (Eupetidae)
In the last edition of Clements, this family included 15 species belonging to 6 genera. Research now demonstrates that most of these species are not related to the Malaysian Rail-babbler (Eupetes macrocerus). Therefore the family Eupetidae is restricted to the Malaysian Rail-babbler and to the Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi). The English name for the Eupetidae is changed to Rail-babbler and Ifrita, and this family is positioned near the Rockfowl (Picathartidae).
The remaining species, the former members of Eupetidae, now constitute two new families, the whipbirds and wedgebills (Psophodidae) for the genera Androphobus and Psophodes; and the quail-thrushes and jewel-babblers (Cinclosomatidae) for the genera Cinclosoma and Ptilorrhoa. Position the Psophodidae and Cinclosomatidae immediately following the Wattlebirds (Callaeidae) and the Stitchbird (Notiomystidae).

Page 517, Bristlebirds (Dasyornis)
The three species of bristlebirds earlier were classified as members of Acanthizidae (Thornbills and allies). They now have been demonstrated to be a separate family, the Dasyornithidae. Place the Dasyornithidae between the Honeyeaters (Meliphagidae) and the Pardalotes (Pardalotidae).
Reference:
Driskell, A. C., and L. Christidis. 2004. Phylogeny and evolution of the Australo-Papuan honeyeaters (Passeriformes, Meliphagidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 31: 943‚Äď960.

Page 522, Australian Chats (Epthianuridae)
These five species, in the genera Epthianura and Ashbyia, are not a separate lineage, but instead are members of the Meliphagidae. Therefore, the family Epthianuridae no longer is recognized by Clements Checklist. Move these species to position immediately following the genus Melidectes.
References:
Barker, F. K., A. Cibois, P. Schikler, J. Feinstein, and J. Cracraft. 2004. Phylogeny and diversification of the largest avian radiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, USA 101: 11040-11045.
Driskell, A. C., and L. Christidis. 2004. Phylogeny and evolution of the Australo-Papuan honeyeaters (Passeriformes, Meliphagidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 31: 943‚Äď960.

Pages 523,525, chickadees and tits Poecile species
Due to a new understanding of the gender of the genus name Poecile (David, N., and M. Gosselin. 2008. Grammatical gender of Poecile and Leptopoecile. Dutch Birding 30:19), the species and subspecies names of several species of chickadees and tits need to be revised. The species names of six species are affected:
–Caspian Tit¬†Poecile hyrcana, revised to Poecile hyrcanus
–Willow Tit¬†Poecile montana, now Poecile montanus
–Songar Tit¬†Poecile songara, now Poecile songarus
–White-browed Tit¬†Poecile superciliosa, now Poecile superciliosus
–Boreal Chickadee Poecile hudsonica, now Poecile hudsonicus
–Gray-headed Chickadee Poecile cincta cincta, now Poecile
cinctus cinctus
–Gray-headed Chickadee¬†Poecile cincta, now Poecile cinctus

Also, some additional subspecies names are affected, as follows:
Caspian Tit Poecile hyrcana hyrcana, revised to Poecile hyrcanus hyrcanus
–Willow Tit¬†Poecile montana rhenana, now Poecile montanus rhenanus
Poecile montana salicaria, now Poecile montanus salicarius
Poecile montana montana, now Poecile montanus montanus
 Poecile montana restricta, now Poecile montanus restrictus
–Songar Tit Poecile songara songara, now Poecile songarus songarus
  Poecile songara weigoldica, now Poecile songarus weigoldicus
–Carolina Chickadee¬†Poecile carolinensis extima, now Poecile carolinensis extimus
–Black-capped Chickadee¬†Poecile atricapillus fortuita, now Poecile atricapillus fortuitus
                 Poecile atricapillus garrina, now Poecile atricapillus garrinus
Poecile atricapillus practica, now Poecile atricapillus practicus
–Mountain Chickadee¬†Poecile gambeli abbreviata, now Poecile gambeli abbreviatus
                 Poecile gambeli atrata, now Poecile gambeli atratus
–Chestnut-backed Chickadee¬†Poecile rufescens neglecta, now Poecile rufescens neglectus
–Boreal Chickadee¬†Poecile hudsonica hudsonica, now Poecile hudsonicus hudsonicus
                Poecile hudsonica columbiana, now Poecile hudsonicus columbianus

Page 540, Variable Sunbird Cinnyris venustus fazoglensis
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to fazoqlensis

Page 545, Golden-rumped Flowerpecker Dicaeum annae sumbawense
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to sumbavense.

Page 546, Thick-billed Flowerpecker Dicaeum agile sumatranum (atjehense)
The correct subspecies name is atjehense: Dicaeum agile atjehense.

Page 548, Black-fronted Flowerpecker Dicaeum igniferum aetum
Correct the subspecies name to cretum.

Pages 549-556, white-eyes (Zosteropidae)
These 97 species, spread among 13 genera, long have been recognized as a separate family, Zosteropidae. Recent research demonstrates instead that the white-eyes are embedded within the babblers (Timaliidae). Therefore, the family Zosteropidae no longer is recognized by Clements Checklist. Position the white-eyes immediately following the genus Yuhina.
References:
Alström, P., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2006. Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38: 381-397.
Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P. G. P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Page 550, Cape White-eye Zosterops pallidus capensis
Correct the range statement to: W Cape Province

Page 554, insert after Santa Cruz White-eye Zosterops santaecrucis:
Vanikoro White-eye Zosterops gibbsi Vanikiro Island, Santa Cruz Arch., Solomon Islands
Reference:
Dutson, G. 2008. A new species of white-eye Zosterops and notes on other birds from Vanikoro, Solomon Islands. Ibis 150: 698-706.

Page 558, Sulawesi Myzomela Myzomela chloroptera charlotta
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to charlottae.

Page 560, Guadalcanal Honeyeater Guadalcanaria inexpectata
Correct the range statement to: Mts. of Guadalcanal (se Solomon Islands)

Page 562, Stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta)
The Stitchbird has been included in the Honeyeater family (Meliphagidae). Research now demonstrates that the Stitchbird is not a honeyeater, and belongs in a family of its own, the Notiomystidae. Place Notiomystidae immediately following the Wattlebirds (Callaeidae).
Reference:
Driskell, A., L. Christidis, B.J. Gill, W.E. Boles, F.K. Barker, and N.W. Longmore. 2007. A new endemic family of New Zealand passerine birds: adding heat to a biodiversity hotspot. Australian Journal of Zoology 55: 73-78.

Page 568, Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis sanghirensis
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to sangirensis.

Page 569, Black-hooded Oriole Oriolus xanthornus andamanensis
Replace the subspecies name with reubeni: Oriolus xanthornus reubeni.

Page 577, Vangas (Vangidae)
As detailed elsewhere in the updates, several new genera are added to the Vangidae (Newtonia, Pseudobias, Mystacornis). In addition, the sequence of genera within the Vangidae is revised, as follows:
Tylas
Newtonia
Leptopterus
Cyanolanius
Calicalicus
Hypositta
Vanga
Euryceros
Schetba
Falculea
Oriolia
Artamella
Xenopirostris
Pseudobias
Mystacornis
Reference:
Yamagishi, S., M. Honda, K. Eguchi, and R. Thorstrom. 2001. Extreme endemic radiation of the Malagasy vangas (Aves: Passeriformes). Journal of Molecular Evolution 53:39‚Äď46.

Page 580, Greater Racket-tailed Drongo Dicrurus paradiseus malayensis
Replace the subspecies name with hypoballus: Dicrurus paradiseus hypoballus.

Page 580, Mudnest Builders (Grallinidae)
The two species of Mudnest Builders (Grallina) earlier were classified as a separate family, Grallinidae. Recent research indicates instead that they are members of the Monarch Flycatchers (Monarchidae). Clements Checklist no longer recognizes the family Grallinidae. Position the two species of mudnest builder within the Monarchidae, immediately following the genus Arses.
Reference:
Christidis, L., and W. E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.

Page 580-581, Wood-Swallows (Artamidae)
Correct the spelling of Wood-Swallows to Woodswallows.

Page 589, Western Scrub-Jay Aphelocoma californica
Previously, Clements Checklist recognized two groups within the Western Scrub-Jay. We now recognize a third group within this species. Remove the subspecies sumichrasti and remota from the Western Scrub-Jay (Woodhouse’s) group; together, these two subspecies constitute a new group:
Western Scrub-Jay (Sumichrast’s)¬†Aphelocoma californica sumichrasti/remota

Page 589, Mexican Jay Aphelocoma ultramarina
Previously, Clements Checklist recognized two groups within the Mexican Jay, Here we change the names of both groups, and we create a third group. The Mexican Jay (Western) group becomes the Mexican Jay (Arizona) group, and the Mexican Jay (Eastern) group becomes the Mexican Jay (Couch’s) group. Finally, remove the subspecies ultramarine and colimae from the Mexican Jay (Couch’s) group. Together, these two subspecies constitute a new group:
Mexican Jay (Transvolcanic) Aphelocoma ultramarina ultramarina/colimae

Page 594, Hispaniolan Palm Crow Corvus palmarum
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Palm Crow.

Page 602, oxpeckers (Buphagus)
The two species of oxpeckers long have been included among the starlings (Sturnidae). Recent research demonstrates instead that Buphagus constitutes a separate family, the oxpeckers (Buphagidae). Position the Buphagidae immediately following the Philippine creepers (Rhabdornithidae).
Reference:
Lovette, I.J. and D. R. Rubenstein. 2007. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) and mockingbirds (Aves: Mimidae): Congruent mtDNA and nuclear trees for a cosmopolitan avian radiation, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution  44, 1031-1056.

Page 610, Red-collared Widowbird Euplectes ardens suahelica
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to suahelicus.

Page 619, Black-headed Munia Lonchura malacca
In accord with NACC and SACC, change the English name of this species to Tricolored Munia.

Page 621, St. Andrew Vireo Vireo caribaeus
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to San Andres Vireo.

Page 622, Warbling Vireo Vireo gilvus swainsonii
Change the spelling to Vireo gilvus swainsoni, following NACC proposal 2009-A-14. We had the name spelled correctly in the group name — Vireo gilvus [swainsoni Group] ‚Äď but misspelled the name when we listed the subspecies.

Pages 625-639, siskins, crossbills and allies (Fringillidae)
The relationships of many genera and species of fringillids recently have been investigated using DNA sequence data (see Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologica Sinica 53: 826-834: and Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7). These papers are consistent with earlier research showing that the Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanididae) are embedded within the Fringillidae. Consequently, the Drepanididae no longer are recognized as a separate family, and instead are included within the Fringillidae.
The research of Arnaiz-Villena and colleagues also indicates that several large and speciose fringillid genera, such as Serinus, Carpadocus and Carduelis, in fact each consist of two or more unrelated lineages. In accord with NACC, here we split the genus Carduelis into four genera: Carduelis (linnets and twites), Spinus (siskins), Acanthis (redpolls), and Chloris (greenfinches). Similar revisions will need to be made with respect to Carpodacus and Serinus, but we defer making those changes until a later date.
Based in part on Arnaiz-Villena et al. (2007, 2008), here we also revise the sequence of genera within Fringillidae, as follows:

Fringilla
Euphonia
Chlorophonia
Leucosticte
Pyrrhoplectes
Callacanthis
Rhodopechys
Bucanetes
Rhodospiza
Pinicola
Carpodacus
Haematospiza
Uragus
Chloris
Loxia
Acanthis
Spinus
Carduelis
Linurgus
Pseudochloroptila
Alario
Serinus
Pyrrhula
Chaunoproctus
Neospiza
Rhynchostruthus
Coccothraustes
Eophona
Mycerobas
[Hawaiian honeycreepers ‚Äď sequence of genera unchanged]
References:
Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologica Sinica 53: 826-834.
Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Page 625, Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Common Chaffinch.

Page 626, Green-chinned Euphonia Euphonia chalybea
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Green-throated Euphonia.

Page 627, White-lored Euphonia Euphonia chrysopasta
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Golden-bellied Euphonia.

Page 627, Yellow-collared Chlorophonia Chlorophonia flavirostris
Change the range statement to Humid forests of e Panama (Darien), sw Colombia and nw Ecuador

Page 629, Pine Grosbeak Pinicola enucleator kamschatkensis
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to kamtschatkensis.

Page 631, Red Crossbill Loxia curvirostra
A new species of crossbill in the Red Crossbill complex, the South Hills Crossbill Loxia sinescuria, recently was proposed from south central Idaho, United States. (For those of you who ‚Äď sensibly ‚Äď track Red Crossbills by flight call type, the South Hills Crossbill equates to Red Crossbill Type 9.) This species has not yet been endorsed by NACC and so is not recognized as a species by Clements Checklist. Provisionally, we grant it subspecies status, so that users have a place to track it in their records; should NACC recognize the South Hills Crossbill as a species, Clements Checklist will elevate it as well in the following Updates and Corrections.
Reference:
Benkman C. W., J. W. Smith, P. K. Keenan, T. L. Parchman, and L. Santisteban. 2009. A new species of the Red Crossbill (Fringillidae: Loxia) from Idaho. Condor 111: 169-176.

Page 631, Hispaniola Crossbill Loxia megaplaga
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Hispaniolan Crossbill.

Pages 631-633, genus Carduelis (Fringillidae)
In accord with NACC, the genus Carduelis is split into four genera: Carduelis (linnets and twites), Spinus (siskins), Acanthis (redpolls), and Chloris (greenfinches). Similar revisions may need to be made with respect to Carpodacus and Serinus, but we defer making those changes until a later date.

Page 631, Yellow-breasted Greenfinch Carduelis [= Chloris] spinoides monguilloti
Delete this subspecies; it is the same as Vietnamese Greenfinch Carduelis [= Chloris] monguilloti.

Page 631, Common Redpoll Carduelis flammea cabaret
In accord with NACC and the BOURC, this subspecies is elevated to species status, as Lesser Redpoll Acanthis cabaret.

Pages 632-633, siskins and goldfinches (genus Carduelis)
As detailed above, the siskins and the New World goldfinches are removed from the genus Carduelis and are placed in the genus Spinus. In addition, there are minor adjustments to the sequence of species within the genus Spinus: move the following species to a position immediately following the Black-headed Siskin (Spinus notatus), and immediately before Andean Siskin (Spinus spinescens):
–Antillean Siskin Spinus dominicensis
–Lesser Goldfinch Spinus psaltria
–Lawrence’s Goldfinch Spinus lawrencei
–American Goldfinch Spinus tristis

This move also resulted in some changes to the scientific names of the following species and subspecies as follows:
Carduelis pinus macroptera now Spinus pinus macropterus
Carduelis notata now Spinus notatus
Carduelis notata notata
now Spinus notatus notatus
Carduelis notata forreri
now Spinus notatus forreri
Carduelis notata oleacea 
now Spinus notatus oleaceus
Carduelis tristis pallida
now Spinus tristis pallidus
Carduelis spinescens spinescens (capitanea)
now Spinus spinescens spinescens
Carduelis xanthogastra
now Spinus xanthogastrus
Carduelis xanthogastra xanthogastra
now Spinus xanthogastrus xanthogastrus
Carduelis xanthogastra stejnegeri
now Spinus xanthogastrus stejnegeri
Carduelis cucullata
now Spinus cucullatus
Carduelis magellanica
now Spinus magellanicus
Carduelis magellanica capitalis
now Spinus magellanicus capitalis
Carduelis magellanica longirostris
now Spinus magellanicus longirostris
Carduelis magellanica paula 
now Spinus magellanicus paulus
Carduelis magellanica peruana
nowSpinus magellanicus peruanus
Carduelis magellanica urubambensis
nowSpinus magellanicus urubambensis
Carduelis magellanica boliviana
nowSpinus magellanicus bolivianus
Carduelis magellanica tucumana
now Spinus magellanicus tucumanus
Carduelis magellanica santaecrucis
now Spinus magellanicus santaecrucis
Carduelis magellanica alleni 
nowSpinus magellanicus alleni
Carduelis magellanica icterica
now Spinus magellanicus ictericus
Carduelis magellanica magellanica
nowSpinus magellanicus magellanicus
Carduelis olivacea
now Spinus olivaceus
Carduelis atrata
now Spinus atratus
Carduelis barbata
now Spinus barbatus

References:
Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologica Sinica 53: 826-834.
Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Pages 633-636, serins and canaries (Serinus)
The sequence of species within the genus Serinus is revised, as follows:
–Citril Finch¬†Serinus citrinella
–Corsican Finch¬†Serinus corsicanus
–Tibetan Serin¬†Serinus thibetanus
–Fire-fronted Serin¬†Serinus pusillus
–European Serin¬†Serinus serinus
–Syrian Serin¬†Serinus syriacus
–Island Canary¬†Serinus canaria
–Mountain Serin¬†Serinus estherae
–Yellow-crowned Canary¬†Serinus flavivertex
–Cape Canary¬†Serinus canicollis
–White-rumped Seedeater¬†Serinus leucopygius
–Yellow-fronted Canary¬†Serinus mozambicus
–Abyssinian Siskin¬†Serinus nigriceps
–African Citril¬†Serinus citrinelloides
–Western Citril¬†Serinus frontalis
–Southern Citril¬†Serinus hypostictus
–Black-faced Canary¬†Serinus capistratus
–Papyrus Canary¬†Serinus koliensis
–Forest Canary¬†Serinus scotops
–Olive-rumped Serin¬†Serinus rothschildi
–Black-throated Canary¬†Serinus atrogularis
–Reichenow’s Seedeater¬†Serinus reichenowi
–Yellow-rumped Serin¬†Serinus xanthopygius
–Lemon-breasted Seedeater¬†Serinus citrinipectus
–White-bellied Canary¬†Serinus dorsostriatus
–Yellow-throated Serin¬†Serinus flavigula
–Salvadori’s Serin¬†Serinus xantholaemus
–Northern Grosbeak-Canary¬†Serinus donaldsoni
–Southern Grosbeak-Canary¬†Serinus buchanani
–Brimstone Canary¬†Serinus sulphuratus
–Yellow Canary¬†Serinus flaviventris
–White-throated Canary¬†Serinus albogularis
–Streaky Seedeater¬†Serinus striolatus
–Yellow-browed Seedeater¬†Serinus whytii
–Thick-billed Seedeater¬†Serinus burtoni
–Tanzania Seedeater¬†Serinus melanochrous
–Principe Seedeater¬†Serinus rufobrunneus
–Protea Canary¬†Serinus leucopterus
–Black-eared Seedeater¬†Serinus mennelli
–Streaky-headed Seedeater¬†Serinus gularis
–Reichard’s Seedeater¬†Serinus reichardi
–Brown-rumped Seedeater¬†Serinus tristriatus
–Yemen Serin Serinus menachensis

Page 634, White-rumped Seedeater Serinus leucopygius riggenbachi
Correct the range statement to: Senegal to w Sudan

Page 638, Hawaiian Honeycreepers (Drepanididae)
In accord with NACC and with considerable recent research, the Hawaiian honeycreepers are now known to be embedded within the siskins, crossbills, and allies (Fringillidae). Therefore, Clements Checklist no longer recognizes the family Drepanididae. Position the Hawaiian honeycreepers within the Fringillidae, immediately following the genus Mycerobas.

Page 642, Arrow-headed Warbler Dendroica pharetra
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Arrowhead Warbler.

Page 644, Tepui Redstart Myioborus castaneocapilla
In accord with SACC, correct the species name to castaneocapillus.

Page 644, Yellow-faced Redstart Myioborus pariae
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Paria Redstart.

Page 647, chats Granatellus species
In accord with NACC and with SACC, the three species of Granatellus chats are removed from the Parulidae and assigned to the cardinal family Cardinalidae. Granatellus now is placed immediately following the genus Pheucticus (grosbeaks).

Page 650, Gray-hooded Bush-Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Gray-hooded Bush Tanager.

Page 652-653, tanagers Chlorothraupis species
page 654, ant-tanagers Habia species
page 654-655, tanagers Piranga species
In accord with NACC and with SACC, all species in these three genera of tanagers are removed from the Thraupidae and assigned to the cardinal family Cardinalidae. These three genera now are placed at the beginning of the Cardinalidae, in the sequence Piranga, Habia, Chlorothraupis.

Page 663, Plush-capped Finch Catamblyrhynchus diadema
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Plushcap.

Page 664, Black-backed Bush-Tanager Urothraupis stolzmanni
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Black-backed Bush Tanager.

Page 664, Rock Bunting Emberiza cia hordei
In the range statement, correct Greeca to Greece.

Page 665, Swallow-Tanager Tersina viridis
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Swallow Tanager.

Page 666, Reed Bunting Emberiza schoeniclus canetti (intermedia)
This correct (oldest) subspecies name is intermedia. The name canneti (note the corrected spelling) is a synonym; since subspecies synonyms no longer are listed in Clements Checklist, the entry is simply Emberiza schoeniclus intermedia.

Page 667, Many-colored Chaco-Finch Saltatricula multicolor
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Many-colored Chaco Finch.
The chaco-finch, formerly included in the Emberizidae, now is thought to be related to the saltators. The saltators in turn traditionally have been included in the Cardinalidae, but recent research shows that they are more closely related to the tanagers Thraupidae (see below). Therefore the chaco finch also will be placed, provisionally, in the Thraupidae, immediately after the saltators.

Page 668, Long-tailed Reed-Finch Donacospiza albifrons
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Long-tailed Reed Finch.

Page 669, Cochabamba Mountain-Finch Poospiza garleppi
Tucuman Mountain-Finch Poospiza baeri
In accord with SACC, both of these species are transferred to the genus Compsospiza.

Page 671, Gray-and-chestnut Seedeater Sporophila hypochroma
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Rufous-rumped Seedeater.

Page 671, Narosky’s Seedeater Sporophila zelichi
The taxonomic status of this species, described only in 1977, has been controversial. SACC recently concluded¬†that the Narosky’s Seedeater is not a valid species, but instead is a localized color morph of the more widespread Marsh Seedeater Sporophila palustris. Therefore, Narosky’s Seedeater is removed from Clements Checklist.

Page 672, seedeaters Amaurospiza species
In accord with NACC and SACC, the three species of Amaurospiza seedeaters are removed from the Emberizidae and are transferred to the family Cardinalidae. Amaurospiza is now placed immediately before Glaucous-blue Grosbeak Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea.

Page 672, Paramo Seedeater Catamenia homochroa
Insert, as the first listed subspecies, the following:
Catamenia homochroa oreophila Santa Marta Mountains (ne Colombia)

Page 673, Cocos Island Finch Pinaroloxias inornata
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Cocos Finch.

Page 676, Pale-throated Serra-Finch Embernagra longicauda
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Pale-throated Pampa-Finch.

Page 677, Olive-headed Brush-Finch Atlapetes flaviceps
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Yellow-headed Brush-Finch.

Page 677 Cusco Brush-Finch Atlapetes canigenis
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Cuzco Brush-Finch.

Page 679, Olive Sparrow Arremonops rufivirgatus rhypthothorax
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to rhyptothorax.

Page 682, American Tree Sparrow Spizella arborea
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name ochracae to ochracea.

Page 683, Sage Sparrow Amphizpiza belli
Correct the range statement for Sage Sparrow (Gray) Amphispiza belli cinerea to: sw. Baja California to Vizcaino Peninsula of nw. Baja California Sur.
Also, in accord with Pyle (1997), we return to Clements Checklist a subspecies that had been deleted in the 6th edition; this subspecies is a member of the Sage Sparrow (Interior) group. Change the scientific name of the ‚ÄúSage Sparrow (Interior)‚ÄĚ group to Amphispiza belli nevadensis/canescens. Insert after Amphispiza belli nevadensis:
Amphizpiza belli canescens Interior s-c California
Reference:
Pyle, P. 1997. Identification guide to North American birds. Part 1. Slate Creek Press, Bolinas, California.

Page 684, Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow Ammodramus nelsoni
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Nelson’s Sparrow.

Page 684, Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow Ammodramus caudacutus
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Saltmarsh Sparrow.

Page 684, Fox Sparrow Passerella iliaca
Revise the subspecies of Fox Sparrow in accord with Pyle (1997):
Correct the spelling of unalaschensis to unalaschcensis.
Delete the synonyms to subspecies unalaschcensis; the name should appear simply as Passerella iliaca unalaschcensis.
Revise the range statement for subspecies megarhyncha to ” Mts. of sc Oregon to c Calif.; > to nw Baja.”
Reference:
Pyle, P. 1997. Identification guide to North American birds. Part 1. Slate Creek Press, Bolinas, California.

Page 686, White-crowned Sparrow Zonotrichia leucophrys
Due to the difficulties of field identification to the level of subspecies, the five groups of White-crowned Sparrow are consolidated into three groups, two of which each contain two subspecies. The new arrangement is as follows:
group Zonotrichia leucophrys leucophrys/oriantha White-crowned Sparrow (Dark-lored)
subspecies Zonotrichia leucophrys leucophrys
subspecies Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha
group¬†Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii¬†¬†White-crowned Sparrow (Gambel’s)
group Zonotrichia leucophrys nuttalli/pugetensis White-crowned Sparrow (Yellow-billed)
subspecies Zonotrichia leucophrys nuttalli
subspecies Zonotrichia leucophrys pugetenesis

Page 686, Rufous-collared Sparrow Zonotrichia capensis perezchinchillae
Correct the spelling of the subspecies name to perezchinchillorum. This change is necessary because the subspecies was named after two people, not one (Dickinson, 2003, The Howard and Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world, Princeton University Press; page 782, footnote).

Page 688, Warbler Finch Certhidea olivacea
In accord with SACC, the Warbler Finch is split into two species:
Green Warbler-Finch Certhidea olivacea
Gray Warbler-Finch Certhidea fusca (includes subspecies becki, mentalis, fusca, luteola, bifasciata, cinerascens and ridgwayi).
Also, note that one of these subspecies of Gray Warbler-Finch, luteola, inadvertently was omitted from earlier editions of Clements Checklist. The range of this subspecies is Galapagos Islands (San Cristobal I.).

Page 688-689, saltators Saltator species
The saltators traditionally have been included in the Cardinalidae, but recent research shows that they are more closely related to the tanagers Thraupidae (see SACC Proposal 321 and SACC Proposal 351. Provisionally we place them in Thraupidae, immediately following Swallow Tanager.

Page 690, Yellow-shouldered Grosbeak Parkerthraustes humeralis
This is another genus that traditionally has been included within the Cardinalidae, but apparently is more closely related to the tanagers Thraupidae. Provisionally we place this grosbeak in the Thraupidae, immediately following Swallow Tanager, the saltators, and the Many-colored Chaco-Finch.

Page 694, Boat-tailed Grackle Quiscalus major
Two subspecies inadvertently were omitted from Clements Checklist. Consequently, the Boat-tailed Grackle contains a total of four subspecies, which can be treated as belonging to three field-identifiable groups. The four subspecies, with their respective distributions, are as follows:
Quiscalus major major  Boat-tailed Grackle (Texas) coastal Texas and Louisiana
  Quiscalus major alabamensis/torreyi Boat-tailed Grackle (Yellow-eyed)
  Quiscalus major alabamensis coastal Mississippi to nw Florida
Quiscalus major torreyi coastal NY s to ne Florida
Quiscalus major westoni Boat-tailed Grackles (Florida) nc to s Florida

Page 696, Streak-backed Oriole Icterus pustulatus
This species contains three groups of subspecies, which may represent two or three species. Revise the English name of the Icterus pustulatus pustulatus group from Streak-backed Oriole (Scarlet-headed) to Streak-backed Oriole (Mainland).

Page 696, Hooded Oriole Icterus cucullatus californicus
Delete this subspecies; it is included within Icterus cucullatus nelsoni (Pyle 1997). Revise the distribution statement for nelsoni to Central California to n Baja and nw Mexico (s Sonora, n Chihuahua).
Reference:
Pyle, P. 1997. Identification guide to North American birds. Part 1. Slate Creek Press, Bolinas, California.

Page 697, Solitary Cacique Cacicus solitarius
In accord with SACC, change the English name of this species to Solitary Black Cacique.

Page 700, genera Raphus and Pezophaps (Raphidae)
These three species are the ill-fated Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) and the solitaires (Raphus and Pezophaps), all of which went extinct in the 17th and 18th centuries. These species long have recognized as related to pigeons and doves (Columbidae), but traditionally have been classified as a separate family. Recent research demonstrates, however, that instead these species were columbids: terrestrial, large-bodied, and flightless, but still pigeons. The family Raphidae no longer is recognized in Clements Checklist. Position all three species within Columbidae, immediately following the genus Caloenas.
References:
Shapiro, B., D. Sibthorpe, A. Rambaut, J. Austin, G. M. Wragg, O. R. P. Bininda-Emonds, P. L. M. Lee,and A. Cooper. 2002. Flight of the dodo. Science 295: 1683.
Pereira, S. L., K. P. Johnson, D. H. Clayton, and A. J. Baker. 2007. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences support a Cretaceous origin of Columbiformes and a dispersal-driven radiation in the Paleogene. Systematic Biology 56:656-672.

Page 700, Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor
In accord with NACC, shift the position of this species; it should be placed immediately after Scarlet Macaw Ara macao (instead of just before).

Page 700, Norfolk Island Kaka Nestor productus
This parrot, along with the Kea, the New Zealand Kaka, and the Kakapo, traditionally was classified in the large, widely distributed family of parrots, parakeets, and macaws (Psittacidae). Recent research demonstrates that the kakas and allies form a new family, New Zealand parrots (Strigopidae). Position the Strigopidae immediately before the cockatoos (Cacatuidae).
Reference:
Wright, T. F., E. E. Schirtzinger, T. Matsumoto, J. R. Eberhard, G. R. Graves, J. J. Sanchez, S. Capelli, H. M√ľller, J. Scharpegge, G. K. Chambers, and R. C. Fleischer. 2008. A multilocus molecular phylogeny of the parrots (Psittaciformes): support for a Gondwanan origin during the Cretaceous. Molecular Biology and Evolution 25: 2141‚Äď2156.

Page 700, Jamaican Poorwill Siphonorhis americana
In accord with NACC, change the English name of this species to Jamaican Pauraque.

Page 700, genera Moho and Chaetoptila
These five species, all extinct, were found in the Hawaiian Islands, and long were classified as members of the widespread family Meliphagidae (honeyeaters). Recent genetic studies reveal that these Hawaiian species were not meliphagids at all, but instead represented an endemic family, the Mohoidae (Hawaiian Honeyeaters). Place the Mohoida immediately before the Ptilogonatidae (Silky-flycatchers).

The sequence of families in Clements Checklist

[The following section was revised on 23 December 2009:]

As noted in the Overview, there are significant revisions to the families that are recognized in the Clements Checklist. A total of six families have been deleted (details above):

Raphidae
Epthianuridae
Grallinidae
Paradoxornithidae
Zosteropidae
Drepanididae

The 221 families accepted by Clements Checklist are listed below (with the names of newly recognized families in bold). We also take this opportunity to correct several family names that were misspelled in our list of families in the 2008 Updates and Corrections (specifically, the correct Phalacrocoracidae over Phalacrocoraciidae; Rhynochetidae over Rhynchotetidae and Nectariniidae over Nectarinidae).

Struthionidae   Ostrich
Rheidae   Rheas
Casuariidae   Cassowaries
Dromaiidae   Emu
Apterygidae   Kiwis
Tinamidae   Tinamous
Anhimidae   Screamers
Anatidae   Ducks, Geese, and Waterfowl
Megapodiidae   Megapodes
Cracidae   Guans, Chachalacas, and Curassows
Numididae   Guineafowl
Odontophoridae   New World Quail
Phasianidae   Pheasants, Grouse, and Allies
Gaviidae   Loons
Podicipedidae   Grebes
Phoenicopteridae  Flamingos
Spheniscidae   Penguins
Diomedeidae   Albatrosses
Procellariidae   Shearwaters and Petrels
Hydrobatidae   Storm-Petrels
Pelecanoididae   Diving-Petrels
Phaethontidae   Tropicbirds
Sulidae    Boobies and Gannets
Pelecanidae   Pelicans
Phalacrocoracidae  Cormorants and Shags
Anhingidae   Anhingas
Fregatidae   Frigatebirds
Ardeidae   Herons, Egrets, and Bitterns
Threskiornithidae  Ibises and Spoonbills
Scopidae   Hamerkop
Ciconiidae   Storks
Balaenicipitidae   Shoebill
Cathartidae   New World Vultures
Pandionidae   Osprey
Accipitridae   Hawks, Eagles, and Kites
Sagittariidae   Secretary-bird
Falconidae   Falcons and Caracaras
Mesitornithidae   Mesites
Rallidae   Rails, Gallinules, and Coots
Heliornithidae   Finfoots
Rhynochetidae   Kagu
Eurypygidae   Sunbittern
Otididae   Bustards
Aramidae   Limpkin
Psophiidae   Trumpeters
Gruidae    Cranes
Cariamidae   Seriemas
Burhinidae   Thick-knees
Chionidae   Sheathbills
Charadriidae   Plovers and Lapwings
Pluvianellidae   Magellanic Plover
Dromadidae   Crab Plover
Haematopodidae  Oystercatchers
Ibidorhynchidae   Ibisbill
Recurvirostridae  Stilts and Avocets
Jacanidae   Jacanas
Scolopacidae   Sandpipers and Allies
Turnicidae   Buttonquail
Glareolidae   Pratincoles and Coursers
Pedionomidae   Plains-wanderer
Thinocoridae   Seedsnipes
Rostratulidae   Painted-Snipes
Laridae    Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers
Stercorariidae   Skuas and Jaegers
Alcidae    Auks, Murres, and Puffins
Pteroclidae   Sandgrouse
Columbidae   Pigeons and Doves
Strigopidae   New Zealand Parrots
Cacatuidae   Cockatoos
Psittacidae   Parrots
Musophagidae   Turacos
Opisthocomidae  Hoatzin
Cuculidae   Cuckoos
Tytonidae   Barn-Owls
Strigidae   Owls
Aegothelidae   Owlet-Nightjars
Podargidae   Frogmouths
Caprimulgidae    Nightjars and allies
Nyctibiidae   Potoos
Steatornithidae   Oilbird
Apodidae   Swifts
Hemiprocnidae   Treeswifts
Trochilidae   Hummingbirds
Coliidae   Mousebirds
Trogonidae   Trogons
Todidae   Todies
Momotidae   Motmots
Alcedinidae   Kingfishers
Meropidae   Bee-eaters
Coraciidae   Rollers
Brachypteraciidae  Ground-Rollers
Leptosomidae   Cuckoo-Roller
Upupidae   Hoopoes
Phoeniculidae   Woodhoopoes and Scimitar-bills
Bucerotidae   Hornbills
Bucconidae   Puffbirds
Galbulidae   Jacamars
Lybiidae   African Barbets
Megalaimidae   Asian Barbets
Capitonidae   New World Barbets
Semnornithidae   Toucan-Barbets
Ramphastidae   Toucans
Indicatoridae   Honeyguides
Picidae    Woodpeckers
Acanthisittidae   New Zealand Wrens
Eurylaimidae   Broadbills
Philepittidae   Asities
Pittidae    Pittas
Furnariidae   Ovenbirds and Woodcreepers
Thamnophilidae   Typical Antbirds
Formicariidae   Antthrushes
Grallariidae   Antpittas
Conopophagidae  Gnateaters
Rhinocryptidae   Tapaculos
Melanopareiidae  Crescentchests
Tyrannidae   Tyrant Flycatchers
Oxyruncidae   Sharpbill
Cotingidae   Cotingas
Pipridae   Manakins
Tityridae   Tityras and allies
Menuridae   Lyrebirds
Atrichornithidae   Scrub-birds
Ptilonorhynchidae  Bowerbirds
Climacteridae   Australasian Treecreepers
Maluridae   Fairywrens
Meliphagidae   Honeyeaters
Dasyornithidae  Bristlebirds
Pardalotidae   Pardalotes
Acanthizidae   Thornbills and Allies
Pomatostomidae  Pseudo-Babblers
Orthonychidae   Logrunners
Cnemophilidae   Satinbirds
Melanocharitidae  Berrypeckers and Longbills
Paramythiidae   Tit Berrypecker, Crested Berrypecker
Callaeidae   Wattlebirds
Notiomystidae   Stitchbird
Psophodidae   Whipbirds and Wedgebills
Cinclosomatidae  Quail-thrushes and Jewel-babblers
Platysteiridae   Wattle-eyes
Prionopidae   Helmetshrikes and Allies
Malaconotidae   Bushshrikes and Allies
Machaerirhynchidae  Boatbills
Vangidae   Vangas
Artamidae   Woodswallows
Cracticidae   Bellmagpies and Allies
Pityriasidae   Bristlehead
Aegithinidae   Ioras
Campephagidae  Cuckoo-shrikes
Neosittidae   Sitellas
Pachycephalidae  Whistlers and Allies
Laniidae   Shrikes
Vireonidae   Vireos
Oriolidae   Old World Orioles
Dicruridae   Drongos
Rhipiduridae   Fantails
Monarchidae   Monarch Flycatchers
Corvidae   Crows, Jays, and Magpies
Corcoracidae   White-winged Chough and Apostlebird
Paradisaeidae   Birds-of-paradise
Petroicidae   Australasian Robins
Picathartidae   Rockfowl
Chaetopidae   Rockjumpers
Eupetidae   Rail-babbler and Ifrita
Panuridae   Bearded Reedling
Nicatoridae   Nicators
Alaudidae   Larks
Hirundinidae   Swallows
Stenostiridae   Fairy Flycatchers
Paridae    Chickadees and Tits
Remizidae   Penduline Tits
Cettiidae   Bush-Warblers and Allies
Aegithalidae   Long-tailed Tits
Sittidae    Nuthatches
Tichodromidae   Wallcreeper
Certhiidae   Creepers
Troglodytidae   Wrens
Polioptilidae   Gnatcatchers
Cinclidae   Dippers
Pycnonotidae   Bulbuls
Regulidae   Kinglets
Phylloscopidae  Leaf-Warblers
Acrocephalidae  Reed-Warblers and Allies
Megaluridae   Grassbirds and Allies
Donacobiidae   Donacobius
Bernieridae   Malagasy Warblers
Cisticolidae   Cisticolas and Allies
Sylviidae   Old World Warblers
Promeropidae   Sugarbirds
Irenidae   Fairy-bluebirds
Hyliotidae   Hyliotas
Muscicapidae   Old World Flycatchers
Turdidae   Thrushes and Allies
Timaliidae   Babblers
Mimidae   Mockingbirds and Thrashers
Sturnidae   Starlings
Rhabdornithidae  Philippine Creepers
Buphagidae   Oxpeckers
Chloropseidae   Leafbirds
Dicaeidae   Flowerpeckers
Nectariniidae   Sunbirds
Prunellidae   Accentors
Motacillidae   Wagtails and Pipits
Urocynchramidae¬†¬†Przewalski’s Rosefinch
Bombycillidae   Waxwings
Mohoidae   Hawaiian Honeyeaters
Ptilogonatidae   Silky-flycatchers
Dulidae    Palmchat
Hylocitreidae   Hylocitrea
Hypocoliidae   Hypocolius
Peucedramidae   Olive Warbler
Parulidae   New World Warblers
Coerebidae   Bananaquit
Thraupidae   Tanagers and Allies
Emberizidae   Buntings, Sparrows and Allies
Cardinalidae   Cardinals and Allies
Icteridae   Troupials and Allies
Fringillidae   Siskins, Crossbills, and Allies
Passeridae   Old World Sparrows
Ploceidae   Weavers and Allies
Estrildidae   Waxbills and Allies
Viduidae   Indigobirds

 

Postscript: Documentation of mistakes in Clements Checklist spreadsheet 6.4 (Last updated 8 January 2010):

The order and family names were left blank for several entries:

For both Tropical Shearwater Puffinus bailloni and for Tropical Shearwater (dichrous) Puffinus bailloni [dichrous Group], the order is Procellariiformes and the family is Procellariidae (Shearwaters and Petrels).

For both Long-tailed Tit (europaeus) Aegithalos caudatus [europaeus Group] and for Long-tailed Tit (irbii) Aegithalos caudatus [irbii Group], the order is Passeriformes and the family is Aegithalidae (Long-tailed Tits).

The wrong family is listed for the Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) and the two solitaires (Raphus solitarius and Pezophaps solitaria); all three species are members of the Columbidae (Pigeons and Doves).

Several entries were associated with the incorrect category; please revise, as follows

Fulmar Prion Pachyptila crassirostris crassirostris, Pachyptila crassirostris pyramidalis, and Pachyptila crassirostris flemingi should be listed as subspecies (not as groups).

Variable Hawk (Juan Fernandez) Buteo polyosoma exsul should be listed as a group (not as a subspecies).

Vaux’s Swift (Ashy-tailed) Chaetura vauxi andrei should be listed as a group (not as a subspecies).

Himalayan Bluetail Tarsiger rufilatus should be listed as a species (not as a subspecies).

Forbes’s Snipe Coenocorypha chathamica is extinct (as is noted in the range statement), and so there should a dagger in the “Extinct” column.

Also, the North Island Snipe Coenocorypha barrierensis is extinct (although this is not noted in the range statement), and so it too should have a dagger in the “Extinct” column.

Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush Monticola erythronota should be listed as a species (not as a subspecies).

As is detailed above, Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis cochinchinensis
jerdoni
is elevated to species level as Jerdon’s Leafbird Chloropsis
jerdoni
. We added an entry for Jerdon’s Leafbird in the spreadsheet,
but we failed to delete the original entry for Chloropsis cochinchinensis jerdoni.

As is detailed above, we asked users of Clements Checklist to change the species name of Tepui Redstart from castaneocapilla to castaneocapillus, in accord with SACC. But it was the SACC name that was incorrect; so the name for the redstart reverts back to the correct form, Myioborus castaneocapilla. The name as given in the sixth edition is correct, and should not be changed.

The following group accidentally was deleted from the spreadsheet; it belongs on the line immediately preceding Variable Hawk (Juan Fernandez) Buteo polyosoma exsul:
–group¬†Buteo polyosoma polyosoma¬†Variable Hawk (Variable)
Andes of sw Colombia to Tierra del Fuego and Falkland Islands

Above we instructed users to delete the subspecies Eumyias panayensis
sanghirensis
from Island Flycatcher, but we then failed (!) to do so in
the spreadsheet; this entry indeed should be removed, as we have no
confirmation that it exists.

Mistakes of various kinds were made in the names of several groups; please make the following corrections:

Andean Teal Anas andium: Change the names of the two subspecies to Anas andium altipetens and Anas andium andium.

Eurasian Buzzard Buteo buteo: Change the English name to Common Buzzard
(as per the note above, in the Updates and Corrections).

Ruddy Pigeon Patagioenas subvinacea: change the scientific name of Ruddy Pigeon (Berlepsch’s) to Patagioenas subvinacea subvinacea/berlepschi; and change the scientific name of Ruddy Pigeon (Ruddy) to Patagioenas subvinacea [purpureotincta Group].

Antipodes Island Parakeet Cyanoramphus hochstetteri: Change the English
name to Reischek’s Parakeet (as per the note above, in the Updates and
Corrections).

Green-crowned Woodnymph Thalurania fannyi: The scientific name of the Thalurania fannyi [fannyi group/Green-crowned] group should read Thalurania fannyi [fannyi group]; the associated English name should be Green-crowned Woodnymph (Green-crowned).

Bar-winged Cinclodes Cinclodes fuscus: The scientific name of the Bar-winged Cinclodes (albidiventris Group) should be Cinclodes fuscus [albidiventris Group]; and the scientific name of the Bar-winged Cinclodes (albiventris Group) should be Cinclodes fuscus [albiventris Group].

Merida Tapaculo Scytalopus meridianus meridianus and Scytalopus
meridianus fuscicauda
: change the name meridianus to meridanus; and move
the range statement “Andes of w Venezuela (M√©rida and T√°chira)” from the
line for Merida Tapaculo Scytalopus meridanus to the line for
Merida Tapaculo (Merida) Scytalopus meridanus meridanus.

Dark-throated Thrush Turdus atrogularis: The English name of this
species should be Black-throated Thrush (as per the note above, in the
Updated and Corrections).

Finally, New Zealand Pigeon Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae is listed twice; delete the first entry.