Clements Checklist

Updates and Corrections – August 2013

2013 UPDATES and CORRECTIONS, to accompany the eBird/Clements Checklist 6.8 spreadsheet (posted 16 August 2013)

The Updates and Corrections are grouped into four sections. Within each section, items are listed in the order in which they are encountered in the Clements Checklist 6.8 spreadsheet, although we also continue to reference by page number the relevant entry in the last published edition of the Clements Checklist (sixth edition, 2007).

The four sections are

Species – gains and losses

Families – gains, losses, and changes to family composition or nomenclature

Standard Updates and Corrections – all other changes, listed in sequence as they occur in the spreadsheet

Groups – a list of new groups

SPECIES

SPECIES GAINS (splits and newly discovered species)

 

Page (addition 2013), Kangaroo Island Emu Dromaius baudinianus

We follow Christidis and Boles (2008) in recognizing Kangaroo Island Emu (Dromaius baudinianus) as a species, with range “Formerly Kangaroo Island (South Australia). Extinct.”

Reference:

Christidis, L. and W.E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

 

Page 55, Speckled Chachalaca Ortalis guttata

In accord with SACC (Proposal 478), Speckled Chachalaca (Ortalis guttata) is split into three species:

Speckled Chachalaca (Ortalis guttata), with subspecies guttata and subaffinis

East Brazilian Chachalaca (Ortalis araucuan)

Scaled Chachalaca (Ortalis squamata)

 

page 57, Horned Currasow Pauxi unicornis

In accord with SACC (Proposal 537), primarily following Gastañaga-C. et al. (2011), subspecies Pauxi unicornis koepckeae is elevated to species rank as Sira Currasow (Pauxi koepckeae).

Reference:

Gastañaga-C., M., R. MacLeod, D.M. Brooks and B. Hennessey. 2011. Distinctive morphology, ecology, and first vocal descriptions of Sira Curassow (Pauxi [unicornis] koepckeae): evidence for species rank. Ornitologia Neotropical 22: 267-279.

 

page addition (2013), Pincoya Storm-Petrel Oceanites pincoyae

Known to birders in recent years as the “Puerto Montt Storm-Petrel”, this species was described by Harrison et al. (2013) as Pincoya Storm-Petrel (Oceanites pincoyae). Note that the validity of this species has not yet been reviewed by SACC. The range of Pincoya Storm-Petrel is: “Known only from waters near Chiloé Island (Reloncavi Sound and the Chacao Channel), Chile”.

Reference:

Harrison, P., M. Sallaberry, C.P. Gaskin, K.A. Baird, A. Jaramillo, S.M. Metz, M. Pearman, M. O’Keefe, J. Dowdall, S. Enright, K. Fahy, J. Gilligan, and G. Lillie. 2013. A new storm-petrel species from Chile. Auk 130: 180-191.

 

page 48, Changeable Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus limnaeetus

Changeable Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus) is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005): Changeable Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus limnaeetus), which includes the subspecies limnaeetus, andamanensis, and vanheurni; and Crested Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus), which includes the subspecies cirrhatus and ceylanensis.

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 48, Mountain Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus nipalensis

The monotypic group Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Legge’s) (Nisaetus nipalensis kelaarti) is elevated to species rank as Legge’s Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus kelaarti), following Gjershaug et al. (2008) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2012).

References:

Gjershaug, J.O., O.H. Diserud, P.C. Rasmussen, and D. Warakagoda. 2008. An overlooked threatened species of eagle: Legge’s Hawk Eagle Nisaetus kelaarti (Aves: Accipitiformes). Zootaxa 1792: 54-66.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

Page 119, Sapphire Quail-Dove Geotrygon saphirina

In accord with SACC (Proposal 566), primarily following Donegan and Salaman (2012), the groups Sapphire Quail-Dove (Indigo-crowned) (Geotrygon saphirina purpurata) and Sapphire Quail-Dove (Sapphire) (Geotrygon saphirina saphirina/rothschildi) are elevated to species rank as Purple Quail-Dove (Geotrygon purpurata) and Sapphire Quail-Dove (Geotrygon saphirina saphirina).

Reference:

Donegan, T.M., and P.G.W. Salaman. 2012. Vocal differentiation and conservation of Indigo-crowned Quail-Dove Geotrygon purpurata. Conservación Colombiana 17: 15-19.

 

Page 127, Green Imperial-Pigeon Ducula aenea

We follow Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) in elevating Green Imperial-Pigeon (Nicobar) Ducula aenea nicobarica, formerly classified as a subspecies (and monotypic group) of Green Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula aenea), to species rank as Nicobar Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula nicobarica).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 153, Plaintive Cuckoo Cacomantis merulinus

The monotypic group Plaintive Cuckoo (Gray-bellied) (Cacomantis merulinus passerinus) is elevated to species rank as Gray-bellied Cuckoo (Cacomantis passerinus), following Payne (2005) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005).

References:

Payne, R.B. 2005. The cuckoos. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page  155, Asian Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus lugubris

Asian Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris) is split into three species. Recent authorities agree in general with this split (Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Payne 2005, Erritzøe et al. 2012), but differ on the details of the composition of each newly recognized species. Our arrangement follows Erritzøe et al. (2012), but note that the taxonomy, and distributions, of these taxa remain poorly known. The three newly recognized species are:

 

Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris, with subspecies lugubris and barussarum)

Following Payne (2005) and Erritzøe et al. (2012) (and Peters 1940), we recognize barussarum (which was not included in earlier editions of the eBird/Clements checklist) as a subspecies, and merge brachyurus into barussarum (following Erritzøe et al. 2012, but not Payne 2005). The range of subspecies barussarum is “Himalayas from Kashmir east to northeastern India and Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand south through the Malay Peninsula to Sumatra, Borneo, and Palawan”.

Revise the range of subspecies Surniculus lugubris lugubris from “Coastal sw India, Sri Lanka, Java and Bali” to “Java and Bali”.

 

Fork-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus dicruroides, with subspecies dicruroides and stewarti).

Revise the range of Surniculus dicruroides dicruroides from “N India to s China and Indochina; winters to Indonesia” to “Indian subcontinent, Thailand, Indochina, and southern China”.

Add subspecies stewarti, described by Stuart Baker in 1919, with range “Sri Lanka”.

and

 

Moluccan Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus musschenbroeki).

References:

Erritzøe, J., C.F. Mann, F. Brammer, and R.A. Fuller. 2012. Cuckoos of the world. Christopher Helm, London.

Payne, R.B. 2005. The cuckoos. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Seram Masked-Owl Tyto almae

Seram Masked-Owl (Tyto almae) is a newly described species, with range “southern Moluccas (Seram)” (Jønsson et al. 2013); insert this species immediately following Golden Masked-Owl (Tyto aurantia).

Reference:

Jønsson, K.A., M.K. Poulsen, T. Haryoko, A.H. Reeve, and P.-H. Fabre. 2013. A new species of masked-owl (Aves: Strigiformes: Tytonidae) from Seram, Indonesia. Zootaxa 3635: 51-61.

 

page 161, Barn Owl Tyto alba

We elevate the monotypic group Barn Owl (Andaman) (Tyto alba deroepstorffi) to species rank as Andaman Masked-Owl (Tyto deroepstorffi), following König et al. (1999) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005).

References:

König, C., F. Weick, and J.-H. Becking. 1999. Owls. A guide to the owls of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Rinjani Scops-Owl Otus jolandae

Rinjani Scops-Owl (Otus jolandae) is a recently described species that is endemic to Lombok, in the Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia. Previously this population was included within Otus magicus albiventris, a subspecies of Moluccan Scops-Owl, but Rinjani Scops-Owl differs vocally and in morphology (Sangster et al. 2013). The relationships of Rinjani Scops-Owl are not known; provisionally this new species is placed immediately following Moluccan Scops-Owl (Otus magicus).

Reference:

Sangster, G., B.F. King, P. Verbelen, and C.R. Trainor. 2013. A new owl species of the genus Otus (Aves: Strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia. PLoS ONE 8(2): e53712.

 

page 174, Brown Hawk-Owl Ninox scutulata

As noted below, we change the group name for most species of Ninox from “hawk-owl” to “boobook”. We elevate the subspecies Ninox scutulata obscura (Brown Boobook) to species rank as Hume’s Boobook (Ninox obscura), following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 174, Philippine Hawk-Owl Ninox philippensis

In accord with recent literature, we standardize the group name for most species of Ninox owls as “boobook” (rather than “hawk-owl”). Rasmussen et al. (2012) revised the boobooks (Ninox) of the Philippines, splitting Philippine Hawk-Owl (Ninox philippensis) into five species, and describing two new species:

Luzon Boobook Ninox philippensis, which includes as subspecies philippensis, ticaoensis, and centralis

Subspecies proxima, with range “Masbate and Ticao”, no longer is recognized (Rasmussen et al. 2012). The population on Masbate is included in Ninox philippensis philippensis, while the birds on Ticao are recognized as a separate subspecies (duPont 1972; see below). Revise the range of Ninox philippensis philippensis from “Leyte, Luzon, Marinduque, Samar, Polillo and Catanduanes” to “Philippines (Luzon, Panay, Negros, Bohol, Samar, and Leyte, and associated smaller islands: Bilaran, Boracay, Buad, Carabao, Catanduanes, Guimaras, Lubang, Marinduque, Masbate, Polillo, and Semirara)”. Add subspecies Ninox philippensis ticaoensis duPont 1972, with range “Philippines (Ticao)”. Revise the range of subspecies Ninox philippensis centralis from “Philippines (Guimaras, Negros, Panay and Siquijor)” to “Philippines (Siquijor)”.

 

Mindanao Boobook Ninox spilocephala   (formerly Ninox philippensis spilocephala)

 

Mindoro Boobook Ninox mindorensis  (formerly Ninox philippensis mindorensis)

Revise the range of Mindoro Boobook from “Mindoro (n Philippines)” to “Philippines (Mindoro)”.

 

Romblon Boobook Ninox spilonotus  (formerly Ninox philippensis spilonota; note the change in the spelling of the species name from spilonota to spilonotus, following Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

Revise the range of Ninox spilonotus spilonotus from “Philippines (Cebu, Sibuyan, Tablas and Camiguin Sur)” to “Philippines (Sibuyan)”. Add subspecies Ninox spilonotus fisheri Rasmuseen et al. 2012, with range “Philippines (Tablas)”.

 

Cebu Boobook Ninox rumseyi; new species, with range “Philippines (Cebu)”; insert Cebu Boobook immediately following Romblon Boobook (Ninox spilonota).

 

Camiguin Boobook Ninox leventisi; new species, with range “Philippines (Camiguin Sur)”; insert Camiguin Boobook immediately following Cebu Boobook (Ninox rumseyi).

 

Sulu Boobook Ninox reyi  (formerly Ninox philippensis reyi)

Revise the range of Sulu Boobook from “Jolo, Tawitawi and adjacent islands in Sulu Archipelago” to “Philippines (Sulu Archipelago on Sulu, Siasi, Tawi Tawi, and Sibutu)”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., D.N.S. Allen, N.J. Collar, B. DeMeulemeester, R.O. Hutchinson, P.G.C. Jakosalem, R.S. Kennedy, F.R. Lambert, and L.M. Paguntalan. 2012. Vocal divergence and new species in the Philippine Hawk Owl Ninox philippensis complex. Forktail 28: 1-20.

 

page 176, Barred Owlet-Nightjar Aegotheles bennettii

Barred Owlet-Nightjar (Aegotheles bennettii) is split into two species, following Dumbacher et al. (2003): Vogelkop Owlet-Nightjar (Aegotheles affinis), with subspecies affinis and terborghi; and Barred Owlet-Nightjar (Aegotheles bennettii), with subspecies bennettii, wiedenfeldi, and plumifer.

Reference:

Dumbacher, J.P., T.K. Pratt, and R.C. Fleishcher. 2003. Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 29: 540–549.

 

page 225, Blue-headed Bee-eater Merops muelleri

The two subspecies of Blue-headed Bee-eater (Merops muelleri) are elevated to species rank, following Marks et al. (2007), as Blue-moustached Bee-eater (Merops mentalis) and Blue-headed Bee-eater (Merops muelleri).

Reference:

Marks, B.D., J.D. Weckstein, and R.G. Moyle. 2007. Molecular phylogenetics of the bee-eaters (Aves: Meropidae) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data.  Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45: 23–32.

 

page addition (2013), Western Puffbird Nystalus obamai

Western Puffbird (Nystalus obamai) is a newly described species, with range “western Amazonia: Ecuador south to Bolivia and east, south of the Amazon, to Brazil west of the Madeira River” (Whitney et al. 2013). Whitney et al. (2013) gave this species the English name “Western Striolated-Puffbird”, and elevated both subspecies of Striolated Puffbird (Nystalus striolatus) to species rank as well. This revision of Striolated Puffbird, and the description of Western Puffbird as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Western Puffbird as a species but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., V. de Q. Piacentini, F. Schunck, A. Aleixo, B.R.S. de Sousa, L.F. Silveira, and M.A. Rêgo.  2013. A name for Striolated Puffbird west of the Rio Madeira with revision of the Nystalus striolatus (Aves: Bucconidae) complex. Pages 240-244 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 239, Crimson-fronted Barbet Megalaima rubricapillus

We elevate the monotypic group Crimson-fronted Barbet (Malabar) (Megalaima rubricapillus malabarica) to species rank as Malabar Barbet (Megalaima malabarica), following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 240, Chestnut-tipped Toucanet Aulacorhynchus derbianus

In accord with SACC (Proposal 520), following Bonaccorso et al. (2011), Chestnut-tipped Toucanet (Aulacornynhcus derbianus) is split into two species, Chestnut-tipped Toucanet (Aulacornynchus derbianus), which is monotypic; and Tepui Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus whitelianus), which includes the subspecies duidae, whitelianus, and osgoodi.

Reference:

Bonaccorso, E., J.M. Guayasamin, A.T. Peterson, and A.G. Navarro-Sigüenza. 2011. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of Neotropical toucanets in the genus Aulacorhynchus (Aves, Ramphastidae). Zoologica Scripta 40: 336–349.

 

page 250, Philippine Woodpecker Dendrocopos maculatus

The monotypic group Philippine Woodpecker (Sulu) (Dendrocopos maculatus ramsayi) is elevated to species rank as Sulu Woodpecker (Dendrocopos ramsayi), as justified by BirdLife International (2013).

Reference:

BirdLife International. 2013. Species factsheet: Sulu Woodpecker Dendrocopos ramsayi. Downloaded from BirdLife International on 17 July 2013.

 

page 250, Brown-capped Woodpecker Dendrocopos moluccensis

Brown-capped Woodpecker (Dendrocopos moluccensis) is split, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). The two polytypic groups, Brown-capped Woodpecker (Brown-capped) (Dendrocopos moluccensis nanus/gymnophthalmus) and Brown-capped Woodpecker (Sunda) (Dendrocopos moluccensis [moluccensis Group]), each are recognized as separate species, Brown-capped Woodpecker (Dendrocopos nanus), and Sunda Woodpecker (Dendrocopos moluccensis). Subspecies cinereigula, previously assigned (erroneously!) to the Brown-capped Woodpecker (Sunda) group, is transfered to Brown-capped Woodpecker (Dendrocopos nanus).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 251, Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker Dendrocopos macei

Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos macei) is split, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). The two groups, Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker (Fulvous-breasted) (Dendrocopos macei [macei Group]) and Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker (Spot-breasted) (Dendrocopos macei analis), each are recognized as separate species, Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos macei), and Freckle-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos analis). Note the change of the English name of Dendrocopos analis, to avoid the overlapping with the well-established name Spot-breasted Woodpecker for Colaptes punctigula of the New World tropics. Subspecies longipennis and andamanensis, previously assigned (erroneously!) to the group Fulvous-breasted Woodpecker (Fulvous-breasted) (Dendrocopos macei [macei Group], are transfered to Freckle-breasted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos analis).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Roosevelt Antwren Epinecrophylla dentei

Roosevelt Antwren (Epinecrophylla dentei) is a newly described species, with range “south central Amazonian Brazil, between the Madeira/Ji-Paraná rivers and the Aripuanã River” (Whitney et al. 2013, who proposed the English name “Roosevelt Stipple-throated Antwren” for this species). Whitney et al. (2013) elevated each of the subspecies of Stipple-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla haematonota) to species rank as well. This revision of the Stipple-throated Antwren complex, and the description of Roosevelt Antwren as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Roosevelt Antwren as a species but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., M.L. Isler, G.A. Bravo, N. Aristizábal, F. Schunck, L.F. Silveira, and V. de Q. Piacentini.  2013. A new species of Epinecrophylla antwren from the Aripuanã-Machado interfluvium in central Amazonian Brazil with revision of the “stipple-throated antwren” complex. Pages 263-267 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Bamboo Antwren Myrmotherula oreni

Bamboo Antwren (Myrmotherula oreni) is a newly described species, with range “southwestern Amazonia, in southeastern Peru, northern Bolivia (Pando) and adjacent Brazil (eastern Acre)” (Miranda et al. 2013). Miranada et al. (2013) elevate both subspecies of Ihering’s Antwren (Myrmotherula iheringi) to species rank as well. This revision of the Ihering’s Antewn complex, and the description of Bamboo Antwren as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Bamboo Antwren as a species but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

Reference:

Miranda, L., A. Aleixo, B.M. Whitney, L.F. Silveira, E. Guilherme, M.P.D. Santos, and M.P.C. Schneider. 2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Ihering’s Antwren complex (Myrmotherula iheringi: Thamnophilidae), with description of a new species from southwestern Amazonia. Pages 268-271 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Predicted Antwren Herpsilochmus praedictus

Predicted Antwren (Herpsilochmus praedictus) is a newly described species, with range “southwestern Amazonian Brazil (south of the Amazon, west of the Madeira River)” (Cohn-Haft and Bravo 2013). We provisionally recognize Predicted Antwren as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Cohn-Haft, M., and G.A. Bravo. 2013. A new species of Herpsilochmus antwren from west of the Rio Madeira in Amazonian Brazil. Pages 272-276 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Aripuana Antwren Herpsilochmus stotzi

Aripuana Antwren (Herpsilochmus stotzi) is a newly described species, with range “Amazonian Brazil (south of the Amazon, on the east bank of the Madeira River)” (Whitney et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Aripuana Antwren as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., M. Cohn-Haft, G. A. Bravo, F. Schunck, and L.F. Silveira. 2013. A new species of Herpsilochmus antwren from the Aripuanã-Machado interfluvium in central Amazonian Brazil. Pages 277-281 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 298, Long-tailed Antbird Drymophila caudata

The polytypic Long-tailed Antbird (Drymophila caudata) is split into four species; this follows SACC Proposal 542, which is based on Isler et al. (2012). The nominate subspecies, Drymophila caudata caudata, is recognized as a monotypic species, with a range of “eastern Andes of Colombia”. In accord with SACC (Proposal 567) the common name of Drymophila caudata is changed from Long-tailed Antbird to East Andean Antbird. Addionally:

 

Drymophila caudata klagesi becomes Klages’s Antbird (Drymophila klagesi).

Drymophila caudata aristeguietana is a synonym of klagesi, and so subspecies aristeguietana no longer is recognized. Revise the range of Klage’s Antbird from “Mts. of n Colombia and n Venezuela” to “Andes of northeastern Colombia (Norte de Santander), the Serrania de Perija (Colombia/Venezuela), and Andes and coastal mountains of Venezuela”.

 

Drymophila caudata hellmayri becomes Santa Marta Antbird (Drymophila hellmayri).

Revise the range of Santa Marta Antbird from “NE Colombia (Santa Marta Mts.) and e slope of E Andes” to “northern Colombia (Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta)”.

 

The populations distributed from central Colombia south to Bolivia become known as Streak-headed Antbird (Drymophila striaticeps).

Four subspecies of Steak-headed Antbird, each of which previously had been treated as synonyms of Drymophila caudata (East Andean Antbird), are reinstated:

Drymophila striaticeps striaticeps Chapman 1912, with range “western and central Andes of Colombia, south to Cauca”.

Drymophila striaticeps occidentalis Domaniewski and Stolcman 1922, with range “southwestern Colombia (Nariño) south through Ecuador (both slopes of the Andes) to northeastern Peru (San Martín)”.

Drymophila striaticeps peruviana Domaniewski and Stolcman 1922, with range “east slope of Andes of central Peru (Huánuco to Cuzco)”.

Drymophila striaticeps boliviana Carriker 1935, with range “east slope of Andes of southern Peru (Puno) and northern Bolivia (La Paz)”.

References:

Carriker, M.A., Jr. 1935. Descriptions of new birds from Bolivia, with notes on other little-known species. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 87: 313-341.

Chapman, F.M. 1912. Diagnoses of apparently new Colombian birds. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 31: 139-166.

Domaniewski, J., and J. Sztolcman. 1922. Nouvelles formes d’oiseaux de la famille Formicariidae. Archivum Societatis Scientiarum Varsaviensis 1(8): 1-4.

Isler, M.L., A.M. Cuervo, G.A. Bravo, and R.T. Brumfield. 2012.  An integrative approach to species-level systematics reveals the depth of diversification in an Andean thamnophilid, the Long-tailed Antbird. Condor 114: 571-583.

 

page addition (2013), Manicore Warbling-Antbird Hypocnemis rondoni

Manicore Warbling-Antbird (Hypocnemis rondoni) is a newly described species, with range “south central Amazonian Brazil, between the Madeira/Ji-Paraná rivers and the Aripuanã River” (Whitney et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Manicore Warbling-Antbird as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., M.L. Isler, G.A. Bravo, N. Aristizábal, F. Schunck, L.F. Silveira, V. de Q. Piacentini, M. Cohn-Haft, and M.A. Rêgo. 2013. A new species of antbird in the Hypocnemis cantator complex from the Aripuanã-Machado interfluvium in central Amazonian Brazil. Pages 282-285 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 302, Immaculate Antbird Mymeciza immaculata

Immaculate Antbird (Mymeciza immaculata) is split into two species, following NACC (Chesser et al. 2013) and SACC (Proposals 541 and 583), in turn based on Donegan (2012). The two northern subspecies, zeledoni and macrorhyncha, are separated as Zeledon’s Antbird (Myrmeciza zeledoni). The three southern subspecies, brunnea, immaculata, and concepcion, become known as Blue-lored Antbird (Myrmeciza immaculata).

With the split of Immaculate Antbird into two species, the names for the group Immaculate Antbird (Central American) (Myrmeciza immaculata zeledoni) change to Zeledon’s Antbird (Zeledon’s) (Myrmeciza zeledoni zeledoni); and the names for the group Immaculate Antbird (Choco) (Myrmeciza immaculata macrorhyncha) change to Zeledon’s Antbird (Choco) (Myrmeciza zeledoni macrorhyncha).

With the change of the English name for Immaculate Antbird (Myrmeciza immaculata), the English name for the group Myrmeciza immaculata immaculata/brunnea changes from Immaculate Antbird (Andean) to Blue-lored Antbird (Andean); and the English name for the group Myrmeciza immaculata concepcion changes from Immaculate Antbird (Concepcion) to Blue-lored Antbird (Concepcion).

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Donegan, T.M. 2012. Geographical variation in Immaculate Antbird Myrmeciza immaculata, with a new subspecies from the Central Andes of Colombia. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 3–40.

 

page addition (2013), Junin Tapaculo Scytalopus gettyae

Junin Tapaculo (Scytalopus gettyae) is a newly described species, with range “Andes of central Peru (Junín)” (Hosner et al. 2013a). We provisionally recognize Junin Tapaculo as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC. We position Junin Tapaculo immediately following Blackish Tapaculo (Scytalopus latrans).

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., M.B. Robbins, T. Valqui, and A.T. Peterson. 2013a. A new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of central Peru. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 125: 233-242.

 

page 284, Plain-brown Woodcreeper Dendrocincla fuliginosa

In accord with SACC (Proposal 540), primarily based on Weir and Place 2011), Plain-winged Woodcreeper (Dendrocincla turdina, including also subspecies taunayi) is split from Plain-brown Woodcreeper (Dendrocincla fuliginosa).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Dendrocincla turdina taunayi (formerly Dendrocincla fuliginosa taunayi) from “Plain-brown Woodcreeper (taunayi)” to “Plain-winged Woodcreeper (Pernambuco)”.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Dendrocincla turdina turdina (formerly Dendrocincla fuliginosa turdina) from “Plain-brown Woodcreeper (Plain-winged)” to “Plain-winged Woodcreeper (Plain-winged)”.

Reference:

Weir, J.T., and M. Price. 2011. Andean uplift promotes lowland speciation through vicariance and dispersal in Dendrocincla woodcreepers. Molecular Ecology 21: 4550-4563.

 

page addition (2013), Xingu Woodcreeper Dendrocolaptes retentus

Xingu Woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes retentus) is a newly described species, with range “eastern Amazonian Brazil, south of the Amazon, between the Xingu and Tocantins rivers” (Batista et al. 2013). Batista et al. (2013) elevated most subspecies of Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes certhia) to species rank as well. The validity of this revision of the Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper complex, and the description of Xingu Woodcreeper as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Xingu Woocreeper as a species but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

Reference:

Batista, R., A. Aleixo, M. Vallinoto, L. Azevedo, P. S. de Rêgo, L.F. Silveira, I. Sampaio, and H. Schneider.             2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Amazonian Barred Woodcreeper complex (Dendrocolaptes certhia: Dendrocolaptidae), with description of a new species from the Xingu-Tocantins interfluve. Pages 245-247 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Tupana Scythebill Campylorhamphus gyldenstolpei

Tupana Scythebill (Campylorhamphus gyldenstolpei) is a newly described species, with range “southwest Amazonian Brazil, west of the Madeira River; possibly also in eastern Peru (south of the Amazon)” (Aleixo et al. 2013). Subspecies Campylorhamphus procurvoides successor of Curve-billed Scythebill, which had a range similar to that of Tupana Scythebill, now is considered to be a synonym of Campylorhamphus trochilirostris notabilis (Red-billed Scythebill) (Portes and Aleixo 2009); consequently we no longer recogize Campylorhamphus procurvoides successor. Aleixo et al. (2013) and Portes et al. (2013) elevated most subspecies of Curve-billed Scythebill (Campylorhamphus procurvoides) to species rank. This revision of the Curve-billed Scythebill complex, and the description of Tupana Scythebill as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Tupana Scythebill as a species, and recognize the proposed splits in Curve-billed Scythebill as new groups, but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

References:

Aleixo, A., C.E.B. Portes, A. Whittaker, J.D. Weckstein, L.P. Gonzaga, K.J. Zimmer, C.C. Ribas, and J.M. Bates. 2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Curve-billed Scythebill complex (Campylorhamphus procurvoides: Dendrocolaptidae), with description of a new species from western Amazonian Brazil. Pages 253-257 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Portes, C.E., and A. Aleixo. 2009. Campylorhamphus procurvoides successor (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) is a junior synonym of Campylorhamphus trochilirostris notabilis. Zoologica 26: 547-552.

 

page addition (2013), Tapajos Scythebill Campylorhamphus cardosoi

Tapajos Scythebill (Campylorhamphus cardosoi) is a newly described species, with range “eastern Amazonian Brazil, between the Tapajós and Xingu rivers” (Portes et al. 2013, who spelled the English name “Tapajós Scythebill”). Portes et al. (2013) and Aleixo et al. (2013) elevated most subspecies of Curve-billed Scythebill (Campylorhamphus procurvoides) to species rank. This revision of the Curve-billed Scythebill complex, and the description of Tapajos Scythebill as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Tapajos Scythebill as a species, and recognize the proposed splits in Curve-billed Scythebill as new groups, but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

References:

Aleixo, A., C.E.B. Portes, A. Whittaker, J.D. Weckstein, L.P. Gonzaga, K.J. Zimmer, C.C. Ribas, and J.M. Bates. 2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Curve-billed Scythebill complex (Campylorhamphus procurvoides: Dendrocolaptidae), with description of a new species from western Amazonian Brazil. Pages 253-257 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Portes, C.E.B., A. Aleixo, K.J. Zimmer, A. Whittaker, J.D. Weckstein, L.P. Gonzaga, C.C. Ribas, J.M. Bates, and A.C. Lees. 2013. A new species of Campylorhamphus (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae) from the Tapajós – Xingu interfluve in Amazonian Brazil. Pages 258-262 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Inambari Woodcreeper Lepidocolaptes fatimalimae

Inambari Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fatimalimae) is a newly described species, with range “western Amazonia: Ecuador south to Bolivia and east, south of the Amazon, to Brazil west of the Madeira River” (Rodrigues et al. 2013). Rodrigues et al. (2013) also elevated all subspecies of Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus) to species rank. This revision of the Lineated Woodcreeper complex, and the description of Inambari Woodcreeper as a species, have not yet been reviewed by SACC. Provisionally we recognize Inambari Woocreeper as a species but refrain from making further revisions in this complex, pending their acceptance by SACC.

Reference:

Rodrigues, E.B., A. Aleixo, A. Whittaker, and L.N. Naka. 2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Lineated Woodcreeper complex (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus: Dendrocolaptidae), with description of a new species from southwestern Amazonia. Pages 248-252 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Delta Amacuro Softtail Thripophaga amacurensis

Hilty et al. (2013) describe a new species of softtail, Delta Amacuro Softtail (Thripophaga amacurensis), with range “northeastern Venezuela (southern portion of the Orinoco delta)”. Note that the validity of this proposed new species has not yet been ratified by SACC.

Reference:

Hilty, S.L., D. Ascanio, and A. Whittaker. 2013. A new species of softtail (Furnariidae: Thripophaga) from the delta of the Orinoco River in Venezuela. Condor 115: 143-154.

 

page addition (2013), Chico’s Tyrannulet Zimmerius chicomendesi

Chico’s Tyrannulet (Zimmerius chicomendesi) is a newly described species, with range “south central Amazonian Brazil (between the Madeira and Aripuanã rivers)” (Whitney et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Chico’s Tyrannulet as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., F. Schunck, M.A. Rêgo, and L.F. Silveira. 2013. A new species of Zimmerius tyrannulet from the upper Madeira-Tapajós interfluvium in central Amazonian Brazil: birds don’t always occur where they “should”. Pages 286-292 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Acre Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus cohnhafti

Acre Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus cohnhafti) is a newly described species, with range “southwestern Amazonia in Brazil (eastern Acre) and adjacent southeastern Peru (Madre de Dios); presumably also occurs in adjacent northern Bolivia (Pando)” (Zimmer et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Acre Tody-Tyrant as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Zimmer, K.J., A. Whittaker, C.H. Sardelli, E. Guilherme, and A. Aleixo. 2013. A new species of Hemitriccus tody-tyrant from the state of Acre, Brazil. Pages 292-296 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page addition (2013), Sucunduri Flycatcher Tolmomyias sucunduri

Sucunduri Flycatcher (Tolmomyias sucunduri) is a newly described species, with range “south central Amazonian Brazil, between the Canumã/Sucunduri rivers and the lower Tapajós River” (Whitney et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Sucunduri Flycatcher as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC.

Reference:

Whitney, B.M., F. Schunck, M.A. Rêgo, and L.F. Silveira. 2013. A new species of flycatcher in the Tolmomyias assimilis radiation from the lower Sucunduri-Tapajós interfluvium in central Amazonian Brazil heralds a new chapter in Amazonian biogeography. Pages 297-300 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 466, Chestnut Wattle-eye Platysteira castanea

Subspecies Platysteira castanea hormophora (Chestnut Wattle-eye) is elevated to species rank as West African Wattle-eye (Platysteira hormophora), following Njabo et al. (2008). Chestnut Wattle-eye (Platysteira castanea) becomes monotypic.

Reference:

Njabo, K.Y., R.C.K. Bowie, and M.D. Sorenson. 2008. Phylogeny, biogeography and taxonomy of the African wattle-eyes (Aves: Passeriformes: Platysteiridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 136-149.

 

page 374, Scarlet Minivet Pericrocotus flammeus

Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus flammeus) is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). The monotypic group Scarlet Minivet (Orange) (Pericrocotus flammeus flammeus) is elevated to species rank as Orange Minivet (Pericrocotus flammeus). All other subspecies remain under the English name Scarlet Minivet, but the scientific name for this species changes to Pericrocotus speciosus.

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 570, Rufous-tailed Shrike Lanius isabellinus

The monotypic group Rufous-tailed Shrike (Turkestan) (Lanius isabellinus phoenicuroides) is elevated to species rank as Red-tailed Shrike (Lanius phoenicuroides), following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). With the removal of subspecies phoenicuroides from Rufous-tailed Shrike (Lanius isabellinus), the English name for this species is changed to Isabelline Shrike.

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 469, Pied Fantail Rhipidura javanica

Split Pied Fantail (Rhipidura javanica) into two species, Malaysian Pied-Fantail (Rhipidura javanica), which includes subspecies longicauda and javanica, and Philippine Pied-Fantail (Rhipidura nigritorquis), following Sánchez-González and Moyle (2011).

Reference:

Sánchez-González, L.A., and R.G. Moyle. 2011. Molecular systematics and species limits in the Philippine fantails (Aves: Rhipidura). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 61: 290-299.

 

page addition (2013), Campina Jay Cyanocorax hafferi

Campina Jay (Cyanocorax hafferi) is a newly described species, with range “southwestern Amazonian Brazil, from the west bank of the Purus River to the west bank of the Madeira River” (Cohn-Haft et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Campina Jay as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC. We position Campina Jay immediately following Azure-naped Jay (Cyanocorax heilprini).

Reference:

Cohn-Haft, M., M.A. Santos Junior, A.M. Fernandes, and C.C. Ribas. 2013. A new species of Cyanocorax jay from savannas of the central Amazon. Pages 306-310 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 591, Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus

The monotypic group Azure-winged Magpie (Iberian) (Cyanopica cyanus cooki) is elevated to species rank at Iberian Magpie (Cyanopica cooki), following Fok et al. (2002) and Kryukov et al. (2004).

References:

Fok, K.W., C.M. Wade, and D.T. Parkin. 2002. Inferring the phylogeny of disjunct populations of the azure-winged magpie Cyanopica cyanus from mitochondrial control region sequences. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 269: 1671–1679.

Kryukov, A., M.A. Iwasa, R. Kakizawa, H. Suzuki, W. Pinsker, and E. Haring. 2004. Synchronic east–west divergence in azure-winged magpies (Cyanopica cyanus) and magpies (Pica pica). Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 42: 342–351.

page 591, Short-tailed Magpie Cissa thalassina

Short-tailed Magpie (Cissa thalassina) is split into two species, following van Balen et al. (2013): Javan Green-Magpie (Cissa thalassina) and Bornean Green-Magpie (Cissa jefferyi). Revise the range of Javan Green-Magpie from “Java” to “lowland slopes of montane western Java”. Note also the correction of the spelling of the species name, from jeffreyi to jefferyi.

Reference:

van Balen, S., J.A. Eaton, and F.E. Rheindt. 2013. Biology, taxonomy and conservation status of the Short-tailed Green Magpie Cissa [t.] thalassina from Java. Bird Conservation International 23: 91-109.

 

page 595, Torresian Crow Corvus orru

Torresian Crow (Corvus orru) is split into Torresian Crow (Corvus orru), including subspecies orru, latirostris, and ceciliae, and Bismarck Crow (Corvus insularis), which is monotypic (Dutson et al. 2011).

Reference:

Dutson, G., P. Gregory, and W. Boles. 2011. Bismark Crown Corvus (orru) insularis warrants species status. Bulletin of the British Ornitholgists’ Club 131: 204-206.

 

page 360, Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica

The monotypic group Pacific Swallow (Hill) (Hirundo tahitica domicola) is elevated to species rank as Hill Swallow (Hirundo domicola), following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 527, Great Tit Parus major

The Great Tit complex (Parus major and allies) is revised, following Päckert et al. (2005). As a result, the polytypic group Great Tit (Cinereous) (Parus major [cinereus Group]) is recognized as a separate species, Cinereous Tit (Parus cinereus); and the polytypic group Great Tit (Japanese) (Parus major [minor Group]) is recognized as a separate species, Japanese Tit (Parus minor).

Reference:

Päckert, M., J. Martens, S. Eck, A.A. Nazarenko, O.P. Valchuk, B. Petri, and M. Veith. 2005. The great tit (Parus major) – a misclassified ring species. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 86: 153–174.

 

page 514 , Long-tailed Tit Aegithalos caudatus

The group Long-tailed Tit (Silver-throated) (Aegithalos caudatus glaucogularis) is elevated to species rank as Silver-throated Tit (Aegithalos glaucogularis) (Päckert et al. 2010). Silver-throated Tit also includes subspecies vinaceus, previously listed as a member of the group Long-tailed Tit (alpinus) (Aegithalos caudatus [alpinus Group]).

Reference:

Päckert, M., J. Martens, and Y.-H. Sun. 2010. Phylogeny of long-tailed tits and allies inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear markers (Aves: Passeriformes, Aegithalidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 952–967.

 

page 532, Eurasian Treecreeper Certhia familiaris

The polytypic group Eurasian Treecreeper (Hodgson’s) (Certhia familiaris [hodgsoni Group]) is elevated to species rank (Tietze et al. 2006), and becomes Hodgson’s Treecreeper (Certhia hodgsoni).

Reference:

Tietze, D.T., J. Martens, and Y-H. Sun. 2006. Molecular phylogeny of treecreepers (Certhia) detects hidden diversity. Ibis 148: 477-488.

 

page 532, Brown-throated Treecreeper Certhia discolor

Brown-throated Treecreeper (Certhia discolor) is split, following Tietze et al. (2006). The monotypic group Brown-throated Treecreeper (Brown-throated) (Certhia discolor discolor) becomes Sikkim Treecreeper (Certhia discolor) (following Rasmussen and Anderton 2012); and the polytypic group Brown-throated Treecreeper (Hume’s) (Certhia discolor [manipurensis Group]) becomes Hume’s Treecreeper (Certhia manipurensis).

References:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Tietze, D.T., J. Martens, and Y-H. Sun. 2006. Molecular phylogeny of treecreepers (Certhia) detects hidden diversity. Ibis 148: 477-488.

 

page 532, Spotted Creeper Salpornis spilonotus

Spotted Creeper (Salpornis spilonotus) is split into two species, following Tietze and Martens (2010). The polytypic group Spotted Creeper (African) (Salpornis spilonotus [salvadori Group]) is elevated to species rank as African Spotted-Creeper (Salpornis salvadori), and the polytypic group Spotted Creeper (Indian) (Salpornis spilonotus spilonotus/rajputanae) becomes Indian Spotted-Creeper (Salpornis spilonotus). Following Dickinson et al. (2006), however, rajputanae is synonymized with spilonotus, and so Indian Spotted-Creeper becomes monotypic. Revise the range of Indian Spotted-Creeper to “north central India (eastern Rajasthan and Gujarat east to Bihar)”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., V.M. Loskot, H. Morioka, S. Somadikarta, and R. van den Elzen. 2006. Systematic notes on Asian birds. 66. Types of the Sittidae and Certhiidae. Zoologische Mededelingen 80: 287-310.

Tietze, D.T., and J. Martens. 2010. Intraspecific differentiation in Spotted Creepers, Salpornis spilonotus (Aves: Passeriformes: Certhiidae). Vertebrate Zoology 60: 163-170.

 

page 394, House Wren Troglodytes aedon

In accord with SACC (Proposal 526), Cobb’s Wren (Troglodytes cobbi) is split from House Wren (Troglodytes aedon). SACC Proposal 526 includes a lengthy list of relevant references, arguably the most important of which is Campagna et al. (2012).

Reference:

Campagna, L., St. Clair, J. J. H., Lougheed, S. C., Woods, R. W., Imberti, S., Tubaro, P. L. 2012. Divergence between passerine populations from the Malvinas – Falkland Islands and their continental counterparts: a comparative phylogeographical study. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 106: 865–879.

 

page addition (2013), Inambari Gnatcatcher Polioptila attenboroughi

Inambari Gnatcatcher (Polioptila attenboroughi) is a newly described species, with range “western Amazonian Brazil south of the Amazon, and west of the Madeira River” (Whittaker et al. 2013). We provisionally recognize Inambari Gnatcatcher as a species, but this description has not yet been reviewed by SACC. We position Inambari Gnatcatcher immediately following Guianan Gnatcatcher (Polioptila guianensis).

Reference:

Whittaker, A., A. Aleixo, B.M. Whitney, B.T. Smith, and J. Klicka. 2013. A distinctive new species of gnatcatcher in the Polioptila guianensis complex (Aves: Polioptilidae) from western Amazonian Brazil. Pages 301-305 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 426, Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler Cettia acanthizoides

Most species of Cettia, including all members of the acanthizoides group, are trasnsferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011). The monotypic group Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler (Hume’s) (Horornis acanthizoides brunnescens, formerly Cettia acanthizoides brunnescens) is elevated to species rank as Hume’s Bush-Warbler (Horornis brunnescens), based on Alström et al. (2007). Revise the range of Hume’s Bush-Warbler from “SE Tibet (Tsangpo Valley)” to “Himalayas of northern India, Nepal, Bhutan, and southeastern Tibet”.

References:

Alström, P., U. Olsson, P.C. Rasmussen, C.-T. Yao, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Sundberg. 2007. Morphological, vocal and genetic divergence in the Cettia acanthizoides complex (Aves: Cettiidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 149: 437–452.

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page addition (2013), Saipan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus hiwae

Yamashina (1942) described a new subspecies, hiwae, of Nightingale Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus luscinius). This subspecies later was treated as a synonym of Acrocephalus luscinius luscinius (Watson et al. 1986), and so did not appear in earlier editions of the eBird/Clements Checklist. Cibois et al. (2011) and Saitoh et al. (2012), however, demonstrated that hiwae clearly is distinct, and so we recognize it as a species, Saipan Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus hiwae), with range “Saipan and Alamagan (Mariana Islands)”.

References:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeography 38: 1963–1975.

Saitoh, T., A. Cibois, S. Kobayashi, E. Pasquet, and J.-C. Thibault. 2012. The complex systematics of the Acrocephalus of the Mariana Islands, western Pacific. Emu 112: 343-349.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Yamashina, Y. 1942. A new subspecies of Conopoderas luscinia from the Mariana Islands. Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 12: 81-83.

 

page 430, Nightingale Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus luscinius

The warbler on Pagan long was classified as Acrocephalus luscinius yamashinae, a subspecies of Nightingale Reed-Warbler, but Cibois et al. (2011) documented that yamashinae merits recognition as a separate species, Pagan Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus yamashinae). Revise the range of Pagan Reed-Warbler from “Pagan (n Mariana Islands)” to “Pagan (Mariana Islands); extinct”.

Subspecies Acrocephalus luscinius nijoi (Nightingale Reed-Warbler) is not closely related to other reed-warblers of the Mariana Islands, and is recognized as a separate species, Aguiguan Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus nijoi) (Saitoh et al. 2012). Revise the range of Aguiguan Reed-Warbler from “Aguijan (n Mariana Islands)” to “Aguiguan (Mariana Islands); extinct”.

References:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeography 38: 1963–1975.

Saitoh, T., A. Cibois, S. Kobayashi, E. Pasquet, and J.-C. Thibault. 2012. The complex systematics of the Acrocephalus of the Mariana Islands, western Pacific. Emu 112: 343-349.

 

page 431, Marquesan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus mendanae

The two previously recognized polytypic groups, Marquesan Reed-Warbler (Southern) (Acrocephalus mendanae [mendanae Group]) and Marquesan Reed-Warbler (Northern) (Acrocephalus mendanae [percernis Group]), each are recognized as separate species, based on Cibois et al. (2011). The mendanae group becomes Southern Marquesan Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus mendanae); the percernis group becomes Northern Marquesan Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus percernis). These two species are not closely related to one another (see the note below on changes to the sequence of species in Acrocephalus).

Reference:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeography 38: 1963–1975.

 

page addition (2013), Society Islands Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus musae

Holyoak and Thibault (1978) recognized musae (described by Forster in 1844) as a valid taxon, although they classified is as a subspecies of Tahiti Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus caffer). This taxon was overlooked by other authorities (e.g. Watson et al. 1986) and was not included in earlier editions of the eBird/Clements Checklist. Cibois et al. (2011) demonstrated that musae merited recognition as a distinct species, which also includes what had been known as a subspecies of Tahiti Reed-Warbler, Acrocephalus caffer garretti. We add musae as a new species, Society Islands Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus musae), with musae and garretti as subspecies. The range of musae is “Raiatea (Society Islands); probably extinct”. Revise the range of garretti from “Huahine (Society Islands). Possibly extinct” to “Huahine (Society Islands). Probably extinct”.

References:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeography 38: 1963–1975.

Holyoak, D.T., and J.-C. Thibault. 1978. Undescribed Acrocephalus warblers from Pacific Ocean islands. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 98: 122-127.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page addition (2013), Mangareva Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus astrolabii

Holyoak and Thibault (1978) described astrolabii as a subspecies of Nightingale Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus luscinius), but Cibois et al. (2011) and Saitoh et al. (2012) documented that astrolabii is a distinct species, Mangareva Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus astrolabii), with range “Mangareva (Gambier Islands); extinct”.

References:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeography 38: 1963–1975.

Holyoak, D.T., and J.-C. Thibault. 1978. Undescribed Acrocephalus warblers from Pacific Ocean islands. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 98: 122-127.

Saitoh, T., A. Cibois, S. Kobayashi, E. Pasquet, and J.-C. Thibault. 2012. The complex systematics of the Acrocephalus of the Mariana Islands, western Pacific. Emu 112: 343-349.

 

Page 427, Spotted Bush-Warbler Bradypterus thoracius

The family Locustellidae (Grassbirds and Allies) is revised, following Alström et al. (2011); many species are shuffled into new genera, and the sequence of species is revised. The Spotted Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus thoracius) complex is transfered to Locustella. Additionally, this complex is split into three species, following Alström et al. (2008): Baikal Bush-Warbler (Locustella davidi); West Himalayan Bush-Warbler (Locustella kashmirensis); and Spotted Bush-Warbler (Locustella thoracica).

References:

Alström, P., P.C. Rasmussen, U. Olsson, and P. Sundberg. 2008. Species delimitation based on multiple criteria: the Spotted Bush Warbler Bradypterus thoracicus complex (Aves: Megaluridae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 154: 291–307.

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page addition (2013), Cambodian Tailorbird Orthotomus chaktomuk

Mahood et al. (2013) described a new species of tailorbird, Cambodian Tailorbird (Orthotomus chaktomuk), with range “southern Cambodia (floodplains of the Tonle Sap, Mekong, and Bassac rivers)”. Cambodian Tailorbird is added to the checklist immediately following Dark-necked Tailorbird (Orthotomus atrogularis).

Reference:

Mahood, S.P., A.J.I. John, J.C. Eames, C.H. Oliveros, R.G. Moyle, H. Chamnan, C.M. Poole, H. Nielsen, and F.H. Sheldon. 2013. A new species of lowland tailorbird (Passeriformes: Cisticolidae: Orthotomus) from the Mekong floodplain of Cambodia. Forktail 29: 1-14.

 

page 433, Dark-necked Tailorbird Orthotomus atrogularis

The eBird/Clements Checklist listed Orthotomus atrogularis chloronotos, a subspecies of Dark-necked Tailorbird, using the nomenclature of Watson et al. (1986). Later authors classified chloronotus (note the correct spelling) as a subspecies of Philippine Tailorbird (Orthotomus castaneiceps). Sheldon et al. (2012) provide evidence that chloronotus is a distinct species, which we recognize as Green-backed Tailorbird (Orthotomus chloronotus). Revise the range of Green-backed Tailorbird from “N Luzon (n Philippines)” to “northern and central Luzon (Philippines)”.

References:

Sheldon, F.H., C.H. Oliveros, S.S. Taylor, B. McKay, H.C. Lim, M.A. Rahman,, H. Mays, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. Molecular phylogeny and insular biogeography of the lowland tailorbirds of southeast Asia (Cisticolidae: Orthotomus). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 54–63.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 512, Rufous-headed Parrotbill Paradoxornis ruficeps

The scientific name for Rufous-headed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis ruficeps to Psittiparus ruficeps, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009). Rufous-headed Parrotbill (Psittiparus ruficeps) is split into two species, following King and Robson (2008): White-breasted Parrotbill (Psittiparus ruficeps), and Rufous-headed Parrotbill (Psittiparus bakeri, which also includes the subspecies magnirostris). The sequence of species of parrotbills is revised, to reflect the new assignments to genus.

References:

King, B., and C. Robson. 2008. The taxonomic status of the three subspecies of Greater Rufous-headed Parrotbill Paradoxornis ruficeps. Forktail 23: 120-122.

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 442, Rufous-rumped Grassbird Graminicola bengalensis

Rufous-rumped Grassbird (Graminicola bengalensis) is split into two species, following Leader et al. (2010): Indian Grassbird (Graminicola bengalensis), which is monotypic; and Chinese Grassbird (Graminicola striatus), which also includes the subspecies sinicus. Also, revise the range of subspecies Graminicola striatus striatus (Chinese Grassbird) from “S Myanmar to central Thailand, n Vietnam and Hainan” to “formerly southern Myanmar to central Thailand, northern Vietnam and Hainan. Population now very low; presumed extinct in Thailand and Vietnam, and possibly extinct on Hainan”.

Reference:

Leader, P.J., G.J. Carey, U. Olsson, H.S. Baral, and P. Alström.  2010. The taxonomic status of Rufous-rumped Grassbird Graminincola bengalensis, with comments on its distribution and status. Forktail 26: 121-126.

 

page 508, Gray-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia

Gray-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe morrisonia), which formerly included seven subspecies, is split into four species, following Zou et al. (2007, 2008):  Gray-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe morrisonia; monotypic); Yunnan Fulvetta (Alcippe fratercula; also includes yunnanensis); David’s Fulvetta (Alcippe davidi; also includes schaefferi); and Huet’s Fulvetta (Alcippe hueti; also includes rufescentior).

References:

Zou, F., H.C. Lim, B.D. Marks, R.G. Moyle, and F.H. Sheldon. 2007. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe morrisonia) of China and Indochina: a case of remarkable genetic divergence in a “species”. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 44: 165–174.

Zou, F., H.C. Lim, B.D. Marks, R.G. Moyle, and F.H. Sheldon. 2008. Corrigendum to Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Grey-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe morrisonia) of China and Indochina: a case of remarkable genetic divergence in a “species”. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 49: 410.

 

page 503, Common Babbler Turdoides caudata

Common Babbler (Turdoides caudata) is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005): Afghan Babbler (Turdoides huttoni), which includes the subspecies salvadorii and huttoni; and Common Babbler (Turdoides caudata), which includes the subspecies I and caudata.

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 491, Gray-breasted Laughingthrush Garrulax jerdoni

Subspecies Garrulax jerdoni jerdoni (Gray-breasted Laughingthrush) is transferred to Garrulax cachinnans (formerly Rufous-breasted Laughingthrush, now Black-chinned Laughingthrush). The two remaining subspecies of Gray-breasted Laughingthrush, fairbanki and meridionalis, are split as a separate species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) and Collar and Robson (2007), and take the English name Kerala Laughingthrush. Kerala Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012), and becomes Trochalopteron fairbanki. Both subspecies of Kerala Laughingthrush are defined as monotypic groups, Kerala Laughingthrush (Central Kerala) (Trochalopteron fairbanki fairbanki) and Kerala Laughingthrush (South Kerala) (Trochalopteron fairbanki meridionale; note the change in the spelling of this subspecies name, following the transfer from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron).

Reference:

Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 12. Lynx Edicions, Ba

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 543, Eastern Crimson Sunbird Aethopyga siparaja

Subspecies Aethopyga siparaja magnifica (Eastern Crimson Sunbird) is elevated to species rank, following Hosner et al. (2013), and becomes Magnificent Sunbird (Aethopyga magnifica).

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., A.S. Nyári, and R.G. Moyle. 2013. Water barriers and intra-island isolation contribute to diversification in the insular Aethopyga sunbirds (Aves: Nectariniidae). Journal of Biogeography 40: 1094–1106.

 

page 542, Flaming Sunbird Aethopyga flagrans

Flaming Sunbird (Aethopyga flagrans) is split into two species, following Hosner et al. (2013): Flaming Sunbird (Aethopyga flagrans, including subspecies flagrans and decolor), and Maroon-naped Sunbird (Aethopyga guimarasensis), including subspecies guimarasensis and daphoenonota.

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., A.S. Nyári, and R.G. Moyle. 2013. Water barriers and intra-island isolation contribute to diversification in the insular Aethopyga sunbirds (Aves: Nectariniidae). Journal of Biogeography 40: 1094–1106.

 

page 542, Metallic-winged Sunbird Aethopyga pulcherrima

Metallic-winged Sunbird (Aethopyga pulcherrima) is split into three monotypic species, following Hosner et al. (2013): Metallic-winged Sunbird (Aethopyga pulcherrima), Mountain Sunbird (Aethopyga jefferyi), and Bohol Sunbird (Aethopyga decorosa).

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., A.S. Nyári, and R.G. Moyle. 2013. Water barriers and intra-island isolation contribute to diversification in the insular Aethopyga sunbirds (Aves: Nectariniidae). Journal of Biogeography 40: 1094–1106.

 

page 541, Mount Apo Sunbird Aethopyga boltoni

Mount Apo Sunbird (Aethopyga boltoni) is split into two species, following Hosner et al. (2013): Apo Sunbird (Aethopyga boltoni, including subspecies boltoni and malindangensis) (note the change in the English name, from “Mount Apo” to “Apo”) and Tboli Sunbird (Aethopyga tibolii).

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., A.S. Nyári, and R.G. Moyle. 2013. Water barriers and intra-island isolation contribute to diversification in the insular Aethopyga sunbirds (Aves: Nectariniidae). Journal of Biogeography 40: 1094–1106.

 

page 675, Greenish Yellow-Finch Sicalis olivascens

In accord with SACC (Proposal 539), based on Areta et al. (2012), subspecies Sicalis olivascens mendozae (Greenish Yellow-Finch) is elevated to species rank as Monte Yellow-Finch (Sicalis mendozae).

Reference:

Areta, J.I., M. Pearman, and R. Ábalos. 2012. Taxonomy and biogeography of the Monte Yellow-Finch (Sicalis mendozae): understanding the endemic avifauna of Argentina’s Monte Desert. Condor 114: 654-671.

 

page 683, Sage Sparrow Artemisiospiza belli

In accord with NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), following Cicero and Johnson (2007) and Cicero and Koo (2012), Sage Sparrow (Artemisiospiza belli) is split into two species: Bell’s Sparrow (Artemisiospiza belli), which includes the subspecies belli, canescens, clementae, and cinerea; and Sagebrush Sparrow (Artemisiospiza nevadensis), which is monotypic. Note that this split does not completely align with previously existing groups in the eBird/Clements Checklist, since the group Sage Sparrow (Interior) (Artemisiospiza belli nevadensis/canescens) included two subspecies, nevadensis and canescens, that now are assigned to different species.

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Cicero, C., and N.K. Johnson. 2007. Narrow contact of desert Sage Sparros (Amphispiza belli nevadensis and A. b. canescens) in Owens Valley, eastern California: evidence from mitochondrial DNA, morphology, and GIS-based niche models. Pages 78-95 in C. Cicero and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors), Festschrift for Ned K. Johnson: geographic variation and evolution in birds. Ornithological Monographs number 63.

Cicero, C., and M.S. Koo. 2012. The role of niche divergence and phenotypic divergence in promoting lineage diversification in the Sage Sparrow (Amphispiza belli, Aves: Emberizidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 107: 332-354.

 

SPECIES LOSSES (lumps and other deletions)

 

page 186, Indochinese Swiftlet Aerodramus rogersi

Indochinese Swiftlet (Aerodramus rogersi) is lumped with Himalayan Swiftlet (Aerodramus brevirostris), in accord with the current consensus on the taxonomic status of this very poorly known taxon (e.g. Chantler 2000, Robson 2000, Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

References:

Chantler, P. 2000. Swifts. A guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world. Second edition. Yale University Press. New Haven, Connecticut, and London.

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1.  Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 198, Green-crowned Woodnymph Thalurania fannyi

In accord with SACC (Proposal 558) and NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), both of which largely follow Donegan (2012), Violet-crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica) and Green-crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania fannyi) are lumped as Crowned Woodnymph (Thalurania colombica).

With the lump of these two species, the English name for the group Thalurania colombica venusta/townsendi changes from Violet-crowned Woodnymph (Violet-crowned) to Crowned Woodnymph (Northern Violet-crowned); the English name for the group Thalurania colombica colombica/rostrifera changes from Violet-crowned Woodnymph (Colombian) to Crowned Woodnymph (Colombian Violet-crowned); the scientific and English names for the group Green-crowned Woodnymph (Green-crowned) (Thalurania fannyi [fannyi Group]) change to Crowned Woodnymph (Northern Green-crowned) (Thalurania colombica [fannyi Group]); and the scientific and English names for the group Green-crowned Woodnymph (Emerald-bellied) (Thalurania fannyi hypochlora) change to Crowned Woodnymph (Emerald-bellied) (Thalurania colombica hypochlora).

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Donegan, T.M. 2012.  Range extensions and other notes on the birds and conservation of the Serranía de San Lucas, an isolated mountain range in northern Colombia. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 140-161.

 

page addition (2012), Sira Barbet Capito fitzpatricki

We accepted Sira Barbet (Capito fitzpatricki) as a species in Clements 6.7, based on its description by Seeholzer et al. (2012). SACC, however, did not accept fitzpatricki as a species (SACC Proposal 545), and so, reluctantly, we now treat this taxon as a subspecies of Scarlet-banded Barbet (Capito wallacei). Each of the two subspecies merits recognition, however, as a group (monotypic): Scarlet-banded Barbet (Scarlet-banded) (Capito wallacei wallacei), and Scarlet-banded Barbet (Sira) (Capito wallacei fitzpatricki).

Reference:

Seeholzer, G.F., B.M. Winger, M.G. Harvey, D. Cáceres A., and J.D. Weckstein. 2012. A new species of barbet (Capitonidae: Capito) from the Cerros del Sira, Ucayali, Peru. Auk 129: 1-9.

 

page 525, Black-crested Tit Periparus melanolophus

Black-crested Tit (Periparus melanolophus) is lumped with Coal Tit (Periparus ater), following Gill et al. (2005), but is retained as a group: Coal Tit (Black-crested) Periparus ater melanolophus.

Reference:

Gill, F.B., B. Slikas, and F.H. Sheldon. 2005. Phylogeny of titmice (Paridae): II. Species relationships based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome-B gene. Auk 122: 121-143.

 

page 527, Turkestan Tit Parus bokharensis

The Great Tit complex (Parus major and allies) is revised, following Päckert et al. (2005). As a result, Turkestan Tit (Parus bokharensis) is lumped with Great Tit (Parus major), although we retain this unit as a polytypic group, Great Tit (Turkestan) (Parus major [bokharensis Group]).

Reference:

Päckert, M., J. Martens, S. Eck, A.A. Nazarenko, O.P. Valchuk, B. Petri, and M. Veith. 2005. The great tit (Parus major) – a misclassified ring species. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 86: 153–174.

 

page 528, Yellow-breasted Tit Cyanistes flavipectus

Yellow-breasted Tit (Cyanistes flavipectus) is lumped with Azure Tit (Cyanistes cyanus), following Salzburger et al. (2002). These three subspecies retain identity, however, as a new polytypic group, Azure Tit (Yellow-breasted) (Cyanistes cyanus [flavipectus Group]).

Reference:

Salzburger, W., J. Martens, and C. Sturmbauer. 2002. Paraphyly of the Blue Tit (Parus caeruleus) suggested from cytochrome b sequences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 24: 19-25.

 

Page 484, Gray-headed Whistler Pachycephala griseiceps

Gray-headed Whistler (Pachycephala griseiceps) is lumped with Gray Whistler (Pachycephala simplex), following Dickinson (2003) and Christidis and Boles (2008). We continue to recognize this group of subspecies as a new polytypic group, Gray Whistler (Gray-headed) Pachycephala simplex [griseiceps Group].

References:

Christidis, L., and W. E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.

Dickinson, E. C. (editor). 2003. The Howard and Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition. Princeton University Press, New Jersey.

 

Page 497, Naung Mung Scimitar-babbler Jabouilleia naungmungensis

The recently described Naung Mung Scimitar-Babbler (Jabouilleia naungmungensis) now is considered to be a subspecies of the more widespread Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler (Jabouilleia danjoui), following Collar and Robson (2007) and Collar (2011). We continue to recognize naungmungensis, however, as a monotypic group, Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler (Naung Mung) (Jabouilleia danjoui naungmungensis).

References:

Collar, N.J. 2011. Taxonomic notes on some Asian babblers (Timaliidae). Forktail number 27: 100-102.

Collar, N. J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume12. Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

Page 401, Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush Monticola erythronota

Benson’s Rock-Thrush Monticola bensoni

Both Amber Mountain Rock-Thrush (Monticola erythronota) and Benson’s Rock-Thrush (Monticola bensoni) are embedded within Forest Rock-Thrush (Monticola sharpei), and so both are lumped with Forest Rock-Thrush. We retain both taxa as separate monotypic groups, Forest Rock-Thrush (Amber Mountain) (Monticola sharpei erythronotus) and Forest Rock-Thrush (Benson’s) (Monticola sharpei bensoni).

Note that erythronota is corrected to erythronotus.

Nominate sharpei, which we also recognize as a monotypic group, Forest Rock-Thrush (Forest) Monticola sharpei sharpei, is the only other subspecies recognized in Forest Rock-Thrush. The genetic analysis by Cruaud et al. (2011), however, suggests that there may be two as yet undescribed lineages within Forest Rock-Thrush, one from the central west of Madagascar (Bemaraha) and one from the northern highlands.

Reference:

Cruaud, A., M.J. Raherilalao, E. Pasquet, and S.M. Goodman. 2011. Phylogeography and systematics of the Malagasy rock-thrushes (Muscicapidae, Monticola). Zoologica Scripta 40: 554–566.

 

Page 655, White-bellied Warbler Basileuterus hypoleucus

White-bellied Warbler (Basileuterus hypoleucus) is lumped with Golden-crowned Warbler (Basileuterus culicivorus). White-bellied Warbler long has been considered to be closely related to Golden-crowned Warbler. The most recent evidence for lumping these two is from Vilaça and Santos (2010); see also the discussion of the taxonomic history of White-bellied Warber in SACC Proposal 493[link: http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop493.html].

Reference:

Vilaça, S.T., and F.R. Santos. 2010. Biogeographic history of the species complex Basileuterus culicivorus (Aves, Parulidae).  Molecular Phylogenetics Evolution 57: 585-597.

FAMILIES

FAMILIES (newly recognized families)

Sarothruridae (Flufftails)

Page 78, flufftails  Sarothrura

The genus Sarothrura is removed from Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, and Coots), and repositioned following Rallidae as a new family, Sarothruridae (Flufftails). The recognition of Sarothruridae as a family is based on Hackett et al. (2008), who showed that Sarothrura was more closely related to Heliornithidae (Finfoots) than to Rallidae.

Reference:

Hackett, S.J., R.T. Kimball, S. Reddy, R.C.K. Bowie, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, J.L. Chojnowski, W.A. Cox, K.-L. Han, J. Harshman, C.J. Huddleston, B.D. Marks, K.J. Miglia, W.S. Moore, F.H. Sheldon, D.W. Steadman, C.C. Witt, and T. Yuri. 2008. A phylogenomic study of birds reveals their evolutionary history. Science 320: 1763-1768.

 

Pluvianidae (Egyptian Plover)

Page 91, Egyptian Plover Pluvianus aegyptius

Egyptian Plover (Pluvianus aegyptius) is not closely related to Pratincoles and Coursers (Glareolidae) (Baker et al. 2007, and references therein), and is separated in a new family, Pluvianidae (Egyptian Plover).

Reference:

Baker, A.J., S.L. Pereira, and T.P. Paton. 2007. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: multigene evidence for the retaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds. Biology Letters 3: 205–209.

 

Paradoxornithidae (Parrotbills, Wrentit, and Allies)

Page 419, White-browed Chinese Warbler Rhopophilus pekinensis

Page 443, Wrentit Chamaea fasciata

Page 503, babblers Chrysomma

Page 507, Golden-breasted Fulvetta Lioparus chrysotis

Pages 507-508, fulvettas Fulvetta

Page 510, Fire-tailed Myzornis Myzornis pyrrhoura

Pages 511-513, parrotbills Conostoma, Cholornis, Psittiparus, Paradoxornis, Psittiparus, Chleuasicus, Sinosuthora, Suthora, Neosuthora (all formerly Paradoxornis – see below)

A new family, Paradoxornithidae, is recognized for parrotbills, Wrentit, and allies. Although Moyle et al. (2012) retained these genera in Sylviidae (Sylvids), the sequence of genera in Paradoxornithidae that we adopt is largely based on their phylogeny:

Myzornis

Lioparus

Chrysomma

Fulvetta

Rhopophilus

Chamaea

Conostoma

Cholornis

Psittiparus

Paradoxornis

Chleuasicus

Sinosuthora

Suthora

Neosuthora

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biogeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

FAMILIES (lumps)

Page 576, Prionopidae (Helmetshrikes and Allies)                                                                              Reddy et al. (2012) and Jønsson et al. (2012) confirmed that the vangas (Vangidae) of Madagascar constituted an endemic radiation, but also documented that the “core” vanga radiation was embedded within a larger group, with representatives from both Asia and Africa. We gather all members of this group into a larger version of the Vangidae. All species formerly assigned to Prionopidae (Helmetshrikes and Allies) are transferred to the Vangidae. Additionally, African Shrike-flycatcher (Megabyas flammulatus) and Black-and-white Shrike-flycatcher (Bias musicus) are transferred from Platysteiridae (Wattle-eyes and Batises) to the Vangidae; and Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus picatus) and Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus hirundinaceus) are transferred from Campephagidae (Cuckooshrikes) to the Vangidae. The English name for Vangidae changes from “Vangas” to “Vangas, Helmetshrikes and Allies”. The sequence of genera that we adopt for the expanded Vangidae is:

Prionops

Megabyas

Bias

Tephrodornis

Hemipus

Philentoma

Newtonia

Tylas

Calicalicus

Hypositta

Leptopterus

Mystacornis

Cyanolanius

Vanga

Pseudobias

Schetba

Eurycerosi

Oriolia

Falculea

Artamella

Xenopirostris

The sequence of species in Newtonia is revised to:

Archbold’s Newtonia (Newtonia archboldi)

Common Newtonia (Newtonia brunneicauda)

Dark Newtonia (Newtonia amphichroa)

Red-tailed Newtonia (Newtonia fanovanae)

The sequence of species in Xenopirostris is revised to:

Pollen’s Vanga (Xenopirostris polleni)

Lafresnaye’s Vanga (Xenopirostris xenopirostris)

Van Dam’s Vanga (Xenopirostris damii)

References:

Jønsson, K.A., P-H. Fabre, S.A. Fritz, R.S. Etienne, R.E. Ricklefs, T.B. Jørgensen, J. Fjeldså, C. Rahbek, P.G.P. Ericson, F. Woog, E. Pasquet, and M. Irestedt. 2012. Ecological and evolutionary determinants for the adaptive radiation of the Madagascan vangas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 109: 6620–6625.

Reddy, S., A. Driskell, D.L. Rabosky, S.J. Hackett and T.S. Schulenberg. 2012. Diversification and the adaptive radiation of the vangas of Madagascar. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 279: 2062-2071.

 

FAMILIES (composition)

Odontophoridae (New World Quail)

Page 66, Nahan’s Francolin Francolinus nahani

Page 70, Stone Partridge Ptilopachus petrosus

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) traditionally has been classified as a member of Phasianidae (Pheasants, Grouse, and Allies), but – surprisingly – this African species is more closely related to Odontophoridae (New World Quail) (Crowe et al. 2006, Cohen et al. 2012). We reposition Stone Partridge at the beginning of Odontophoridae. Similarly, Nahan’s Francolin (Francolinus nahani) is more closely related to Stone Partridge than it is to true francolins (Francolinus) of Phasianidae. We transfer Nahan’s Francolin from Phasianidae to Odontophoridae, and to the genus Ptilopachus, and position Nahan’s Francolin immediately following Stone Partridge.

References:

     Cohen, C., J.L. Wakeling, T.G. Mandiwana-Neudani, E.Sande, C. Dranzoa, T.M. Crowe, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2012. Phylogenetic affinities of evolutionarily enigmatic African galliforms: the Stone Partridge Ptilopachus petrosus and Nahan’s Francolin Francolinus nahani, and support for their sister relationship with New World quails. Ibis 154: 768-780.

     Crowe, T.M., R.C.K. Bowie, P. Bloomer, T.G. Mandiwana,  T.A.J. Hedderson, E. Randi, S.L. Pereira, and  J Wakeling. 2006. Phylogenetics, biogeography and classification of, and characteristic evolution in, gamesbirds (Aves: Galliformes): effects of character exclusion, data partitioning and missing data. Cladistics 22: 495–532.

 

page 434, White-tailed Warbler Poliolais lopezi

White-tailed Warbler (Poliolais lopezi) is transferred from Sylviidae (Sylvids) to Cisticolidae (Cisticolas and Allies), following Olsson et al. (2013). Insert White-tailed Warbler to a new position, immediately following the genus Apalis.

Reference:

     Olsson, U., M. Irestedt, G. Sangster, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Alström. 2013. Systematic revision of the avian family Cisticolidae based on a multi-locus phylogeny of all genera. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 790–799.

 

page 507, Gold-fronted Fulvetta Schoeniparus variegaticeps

Gold-fronted Fulvetta is transferred from the genus Schoeniparus to Alcippe, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Schoeniparus variegaticeps to Alcippe variegaticeps. This change also transfers Gold-fronted Fulvetta from Pellorneidae (Ground Babblers and Allies) to Leiothrichidae (Laughingthrushes and Allies).

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 508, Ludlow’s Fulvetta Fulvetta ludlowi

Ludlow’s Fulvetta is transferred from the genus Fulvetta to Alicppe, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Fulvetta ludlowi to Alicppe ludlowi. This change also transfers Ludlow’s Fulvetta from Sylviidae (Sylvids) to Leiothrichidae (Laughingthrushes and Allies).

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 508, Brown Fulvetta Alcippe brunneicauda

page 508, Brown-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe poioicephala

page 508, Javan Fulvetta Alcippe pyrrhoptera

page 509, Mountain Fulvetta Alcippe peracensis

page 509, Nepal Fulvetta Alcippe nipalensis

page 509, Black-browed Fulvetta Alcippe grotei

Brown Fulvetta (Alcippe brunneicauda), Brown-cheeked Fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala), Javan Fulvetta (Alcippe pyrrhoptera), Mountain Fulvetta (Alcippe peracensis), Nepal Fulvetta (Alcippe nipalensis), and Black-browed Fulvetta (Alcippe grotei) are transferred from Pellorneidae (Ground Babblers and Allies) to Leiothrichidae (Laughingthrushes and Allies), following Moyle et al. (2012).

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

STANDARD UPDATES and CORRECTIONS

 

page 5, Chilean Tinamou Nothoprocta perdicaria

Revise the range of Nothoprocta perdicaria sanborni (Chilean Tinamou) from “S-central Chile (Maule to Llanquihue) and adjacent Argentina” to “south central Chile (Maule to Llanquihue)”.

 

Page 26, Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Dendrocygna autumnalis

The scientific name of the group Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (Northern) is Dendrocygna autumnalis fulgens (and not Dendrocygna autumnalis autumnalis), following Banks (1978).

Similarly, the scientific name of the group Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (Southern) is Dendrocygna autumnalis autumnalis (and not Dendrocygna autumnalis discolor), following Banks (1978).

Reference:

Banks, R.C. 1978. Nomenclature of the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck. Auk 95: 348-352.

 

page 32, Common Eider  Somateria mollissima

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name for the monotypic group Common Eider (Pacific) from v-nigra to v-nigrum, following Bruce and David (2007).

Reference:

Bruce, M., and N. David. 2007. Spelling, authorship, and date of the name of the Pacific Eider (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum). Auk 124: 709-712.

 

page 55, Cauca Guan Penelope perspicax

Revise the range of Cauca Guan (Penelope perspicax) from “Subtropical W and C Andes of Colombia (possibly extinct)” to “central Cauca Valley, Colombia, in both the western and central Andes; formerly (?) also on the west slope of the western Andes”.

 

page 68, Rock Bush-Quail Perdicula argoondah

Correct the spelling of the name of a subspecies of Rock Bush-Quail (Perdicula argoondah) from salimali to salimalii.

Reference:

Whistler, H. 1943. [notes on the birds of Mysore] Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 44: 206-220.

 

page 70, Ceylon Spurfowl Galloperdix bicalcarata

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Harrison 2011, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name of Galloperdix bicalcarata from “Ceylon Spurfowl” to “Sri Lanka Spurfowl”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 71, Ceylon Junglefowl Gallus lafayetii

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Harrison 2011, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name of Gallus lafayetii from “Ceylon Junglefowl” to “Sri Lanka Junglefowl”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 9, Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulans

Revise the range of the monotypic group Wandering Albatross (Tristan) (Diomedea exulans dabbenena) from “Tristan da Cunha and Gough islands” to “Breeds Tristan da Cunha group (Gough, Inaccessible, and, formerly, Tristan da Cunha), South Atlantic; ranges at sea at least in South Atlantic and southwestern Indian Oceans”.

Revise the range of the monotypic group Wandering Albatross (New Zealand) (Diomedea exulans antipodensis) from “Antipodes Islands” to “Breeds Antipodes Islands and (small numbers) Campbell Island (New Zealand); ranges at sea at least to Tasman Sea east across southern Pacific Ocean”.

Revise the range of the monotypic group Wandering Albatross (Gibson’s) (Diomedea exulans gibsoni) from “Marion and Crozet islands” to “Breeds Auckland Islands (New Zealand); ranges at sea at least from Tasman Sea to mid Pacific Ocean”.

 

page 14, European Storm-Petrel Hydrobates pelagicus

A typo in the scientific name the monotypic group European Storm-Petrel (Mediterranean) (Hydrobates pelagicus militensis) is corrected; the correct spelling is Hydrobates pelagicus melitensis.

 

page 16, Brown Booby Sula leucogaster

Revise the range of the monotypic group Brown Booby (Forster’s) (Sula leucogaster plotus) from “Islands in Red Sea, tropical Indian Ocean and s China Sea” to “breeds on islands in the Red Sea, tropical Indian Ocean, and tropical western and central Pacific Ocean”.

 

page 17, Magellan Cormorant Phalacrocorax magellanicus

In accord with SACC (Proposal 535), change the English name of Phalacrocorax magellanicus from Magellan Cormorant to Magellanic Cormorant.

 

page 18, Little Pied Cormorant Phalacrocorax melanoleucos

Corrent the range of subspecies Phalacrocorax melanoleucos brevicauda (Little Pied Cormorant) from “Rennel I. (Solomon Islands)” to “Rennell Island (Solomon Islands)”.

 

page 37, Lammergeier Gypaetus barbatus

Change the English name for the monotypic group Gypaetus barbatus barbatus from Lammergeier (Lammergeier) to Lammergeier (Eurasian).

Change the English name for the monotypic group Gypaetus barbatus meridionalis from Lammergeier (Baardaasvoel) to Lammergeier (African).

 

page 87, White-bellied Bustard Eupodotis senegalensis

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group White-bellied Bustard (White-bellied) from Eupodotis senegalensis [senegalensis group] to Eupodotis senegalensis [senegalensis Group].

 

page 80, Buff-banded Rail  Gallirallus philippensis

Revise the range of subspecies Gallirallus philippensis philippensis (Buff-banded Rail) from “Philippine Islands” to “Philippine Islands, Sulawesi, Sula Islands (Taliabu), Moluccas (Buru), and the Lesser Sunda Islands (Sumba, Alor, Sawu, Roti, and Timor)”.

 

page 81, Clapper Rail Rallus longirostris

In accord with nomenclatural priority, change the scientific name for the polytypic group Clapper Rail (Gulf Coast) from Rallus longirostris scottii/saturatus to Rallus longirostris saturatus/scottii.

Change the English name for the monotypic group Rallus longirostris cypereti from “Clapper Rail (Cyperet’s)” to “Clapper Rail (Mangrove)”.

Change the English name for the polytypic group Rallus longirostris [pallidus Group] from “Clapper Rail (Central American)” to “Clapper Rail (Yucatan)”.

 

page 81, Luzon Rail Lewinia mirificus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Luzon Rail from Lewinia mirificus to Lewinia mirifica, following David and Gosselin (2002).

Reference:

David, N., and M. Gosselin. 2002. The grammatical gender of avian genera. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 122: 257-282.

 

page 82, Lewin’s Rail Lewinia pectoralis

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the subspecies of Lewin’s Rail of the central Highlands of New Guinea from Lewinia pectoralis captus to Lewinia pectoralis capta, following David and Gosselin (2002).

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the subspecies of Lewin’s Rail of the Herzog Mountains of eastern New Guinea from Lewinia pectoralis insulsus to Lewinia pectoralis insula, following David and Gosselin (2002).

Reference:

David, N., and M. Gosselin. 2002. The grammatical gender of avian genera. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 122: 257-282.

 

pages 75-108, Charadriiformes

The sequence of families of Charadriiformes is revised, following Baker et al. (2007), Hackett et al. (2008), and references cited in these publications. The sequence of families that we adopt is:

Chionidae                       Sheathbills

Pluvianellidae                 Magellanic Plover

Burhinidae                     Thick-knees

Pluvianidae                    Egyptian Plover

Recurvirostridae            Stilts and Avocets

Ibidorhynchidae             Ibisbill

Haematopodidae            Oystercatchers

Charadriidae                  Plovers and Lapwings

Pedionomidae                Plains-wanderer

Thinocoridae                  Seedsnipes

Rostratulidae                  Painted-Snipes

Jacanidae                        Jacanas

Scolopacidae                  Sandpipers and Allies

Turnicidae                      Buttonquail

Dromadidae                   Crab Plover

Glareolidae                     Pratincoles and Coursers

Stercorariidae                 Skuas and Jaegers

Alcidae                          Auks, Murres, and Puffins

Laridae                           Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers

References:

Baker, A.J., S.L. Pereira, and T.P. Paton. 2007. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: multigene evidence for the Cretaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds.  Biology Letters 3: 205–209.

Hackett, S.J., R.T. Kimball, S. Reddy, R.C.K. Bowie, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, J.L. Chojnowski, W.A. Cox, K.-L. Han, J. Harshman, C.J. Huddleston, B.D. Marks, K.J. Miglia, W.S. Moore, F.H. Sheldon, D.W. Steadman, C.C. Witt, and T. Yuri. 2008. A phylogenomic study of birds reveals their evolutionary history. Science 320: 1763-1768.

 

pages 92-95, Charadriidae (Plovers and Lapwings)

The sequence of genera in Plovers and Lapwings (Charadriidae) is revised, following Baker et al. (2012). The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Pluvialis

Oreopholus

Vanellus

Charadrius

Erythrogonys

Thinornis

Elseyornis

Peltohyas

Anarhynchus

Phegornis

Reference:

Baker, A.J., Y. Yatsenko, and E.S. Taveres. 2012. Eight independent nuclear genes support monophyly of the plovers: the role of mutational variance in gene trees. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 631-641.

 

page 95, Greater Sand-Plover Charadrius leschenaultii

The name Charadrius leschenaultii crassirostris (Severtzov 1873) is preoccupied by Charadrius wilsonia crassirostris Spix 1825 (the name for a subspecies of Wilson’s Plover), and is replaced by the name scythicus Carlos, Roselaar, and Voisin 2012 (Carlos et al. 2012).

Reference:

Carlos, C.J., C.S. Roselaar, and J.F. Voisin. 2012. A replacement name for Charadrius leschenaultii crassirostris (Severtzov, 1873), a subspecies of Greater Sand Plover. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 70-71.

 

page 94, Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus

Revise the range for the monotypic group Charadrius alexandrinus alexandrinus (Kentish Plover) from “W Palearctic to ne China; winters to Africa, s Asia, Indonesia” to “breeds western Palearctic to eastern China, southern Japan, and Ryukyu Islands; winters to Africa, southern Asia, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Borneo”.

 

page 93, Wilson’s Plover Charadrius wilsonia

Revise the range of the nominate subspecies of Wilson’s Plover, Charadrius wilsonia wilsonia, from “Coastal e US to Belize and West Indies; winters to e Brazil” to “Breeds coastal eastern US south to Belize and West Indies; winters to Suriname”.

Insert a newly recognized subspecies of Wilson’s Plover, Charadrius wilsonia crassirostris (Carlos and Voison 2011) immediately following Charadrius wilsonia cinnamominus, with range “coastal northeastern Brazil (Amapá to Bahia)”.

Reference:

Carlos, C.J., and J.F. Voisin. 2011. Charadrius wilsonia brasiliensis Grantsau & Lima, 2008, is a junior synonym of Charadrius crassirostris Spix, 1825. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 131: 165-170.

 

page 700, White-winged Sandpiper Prosobonia leucoptera

Revise the range for White-winged Sandpiper (Prosobonia leucoptera) from “Formerly Tahitia and Moorea. Extinct; last reported 1790” to “formerly Society Islands (Tahiti and Moorea). Extinct”.

 

page 98, Surfbird Aphriza virgata

page 99, Ruff Philomachus pugnax

page 99, Broad-billed Sandpiper Limicola falcinellus

page 99, Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus

page 99, Buff-breasted Sandpiper Tryngites subruficollis

Traditionally, all of these species have been classified in separate, monotypic genera. Each of these species, however, apparently is embedded within the genus Calidris. Consequently, the following changes are made to these names of the species:

The scientific name for Surfbird changes from Aphriza virgata to Calidris virgata.

The scientific name for Ruff changes from Philomachus pugnax to Calidris pugnax.

The scientific name for Broad-billed Sandpiper changes from Limicola falcinellus to Calidris falcinellus.

The scientific name for Spoon-billed Sandpiper changes from Eurynorhynchus pygmeus to Calidris pygmea.

The scientific name for Buff-breasted Sandpiper changes from Tryngites subruficollis to Calidris subruficollis.

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

page 98, Calidris

The sequence of species in the genus Calidris is revised, following NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), based on Gibson and Baker (2012). The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Calidris tenuirostris                    Great Knot

Calidris canutus                         Red Knot

Calidris virgata                          Surfbird

Calidris pugnax                          Ruff

Calidris falcinellus                     Broad-billed Sandpiper

Calidris acuminata                     Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Calidris himantopus                   Stilt Sandpiper

Calidris ferruginea                     Curlew Sandpiper

Calidris temminckii                    Temminck’s Stint

Calidris subminuta                     Long-toed Stint

Calidris pygmea                         Spoon-billed Sandpiper

Calidris ruficollis                        Red-necked Stint

Calidris alba                              Sanderling

Calidris alpina                           Dunlin

Calidris ptilocnemis                   Rock Sandpiper

Calidris maritima                       Purple Sandpiper

Calidris bairdii                           Baird’s Sandpiper

Calidris minuta                          Little Stint

Calidris minutilla                       Least Sandpiper

Calidris fuscicollis                      White-rumped Sandpiper

Calidris subruficollis                  Buff-breasted Sandpiper

Calidris melanotos                     Pectoral Sandpiper

Calidris pusilla                           Semipalmated Sandpiper

Calidris mauri                            Western Sandpiper

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

page 99, Dunlin Calidris alpina

Correct the spelling of the subspecies of Dunlin of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril Islands from kistchinskii to kistchinski (Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 102, Relict Gull Ichthyaetus relictus

Revise the range of Relict Gull (Ichthyaetus relictus) from “Kazakstan to Mongolia; winters to eastern China Sea” to “Breeds from Kazakhstan east to Mongolia and northern China. Winters in eastern Asia, primarily near the East China Sea” (Olsen and Larsson 2003, Brazil 2009).

References:

Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Olsen, K.M., and H. Larsson. 2004. Gulls of North America, Europe, and Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 110,  Lemon Dove Columba larvata

The scientific name for the widespread West African subspecies of Lemon Dove (Columba larvata) is corrected from Columba larvata hypoleuca to Columba larvata inornata (Penhallurick 2010).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J. 2010. The correct name of the West African subspecies of African Lemon Dove Columba larvata. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 304-305.

 

page 124, Maroon-chinned Fruit-Dove Ptilinopus epius

Correct the scientific name for Maroon-chinned Fruit-Dove from Ptilinopus epia to Ptilinopus epius (Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 155,  Philippine Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus velutinus

Following Payne (2005) and Erritzøe et al. (2012), we recognize three subspecies of Philippine Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus velutinus):

Subspecies chalybaeus occurs in the “Philippines (Luzon, Mindoro and Negros)”.

The nominate subspecies, velutinus, occurs in the “southern Philippines (Basilan, Biliran, Leyte, Samar, Mindanao, Malamaui, and Bohol)”.

Subspecies suluensis occurs on “Jolo, Bongao and Tawi Tawi, Sulu Archipelago”.

References:

Erritzøe, J., C.F. Mann, F. Brammer, and R.A. Fuller. 2012. Cuckoos of the world. Christopher Helm, London.

Payne, R.B. 2005. The cuckoos. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 155, Asian Koel Eudynamys scolopaceus

Change the scientific name for the polytypic group Asian Koel (Pacific) from Eudynamys scolopaceus orientalis to Eudynamys scolopaceus [orientalis Group], and expand this group to include the subspecies corvinus, orientalis, picatus, rufiventer, salvadorii, and alberti.

 

page 160, New Britain Masked-Owl Tyto aurantia

Revise the English name of New Britain Masked-Owl (Tyto aurantia) to Golden Masked-Owl, in accord with recent usage (König et al. 1999, König and Weick 2008, Dutson 2011).

References:

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christop.her Helm, London.

König, C., and F. Weick. 2008. Owls of the world. Second edition. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

König. C., F. Weick, and H.-H. Becking. 1999. Owls. A guide to the owls of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

page 164, Moluccan Scops-Owl Otus magicus

Following the description of the scops-owl on Lombok as a separate species (Rinjani Scops-Owl Otus jolandae), revise the range of Otus magicus albiventris (Moluccan Scops-Owl) from “Lesser Sundas (Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores, Besar, Lomblen)” to “Lesser Sundas (Sumbawa, Flores, Besar, Lomblen)”.

 

page 164, Sulawesi Scops-Owl Otus manadensis

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Sulawesi) from Otus manadensis [manadensis Group] to Otus manadensis manadensis/mendeni.

 

page 164, Flammulated Owl Otus flammeolus

In accord with NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), and based on Proudfoot et al. (2007) and on Flammulated Owl is moved from Otus to the monotypic genus Psiloscops. Its taxonomic position is now placed after Otus and before Megascops.

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Proudfoot, G.A., F.R. Gehlbach, and R,L. Honeycutt. 2007. Mitochondrial DNA variation and phylogeography of the Eastern and Western screech-owls. Condor 109: 617–627.

Wink, M., A.A. El-Sayed, H. Sauer-Gürth, and J. Gonzalez. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of owls (Strigiformes) inferred from DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b and the nuclear RAG-1 gene. Ardea 97: 581-591.

 

page 165, Koepcke’s Screech-Owl Megascops koepckeae

Add a newly described subspecies as a monotypic group, Kopecke’s Screech-Owl (Apurimac) Megascops koepckeae hockingi Fjeldså et al. 2012, with range “interAndean valleys of central Peru”. With the description of this subspecies, Koepcke’s Screech-Owl no longer is monotypic. Add Megascops koepckeae koepeckeae as a monotypic group, Koepcke’s Screech-Owl (Koepcke’s), with range “west slope of Andes of Peru from Lambayeque to Lima, and Marañón valley in Amazonas”.

Reference:

Fjeldså, J., J. Baiker, G. Engblom, I. Franke, D. Geale, N.K. Krabbe, D.F. Lane, M. Lezama, F. Schmitt, R.S.R. Williams, J. Ugarte-Núñez, V. Yábar, and R. Yábar. 2012. Reappraisal of Koepcke’s Screech-Owl Megascops koepckeae and description of a new subspecies. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 180-193.

 

page 166, Bare-legged Owl Gymnoglaux lawrencii

In accord with NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), and following Olson and Suárez (2008), Bare-legged Owl is transferred from the genus Gymnoglaux to the new genus Margarobyas; the scientific name for this species becomes Margarobyas lawrencii.

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Olson, S.L., and W. and Suárez. 2008. A new generic name for the Cuban Bare-legged Owl Gymnoglaux lawrencii Sclater and Salvin. Zootaxa 1960: 67-78.

 

page 174, Andaman Hawk-Owl Ninox affinis

page 174, Little Sumba Hawk-Owl Ninox sumbaensis

page 174, Brown Hawk-Owl Ninox scutulata

page 174, Ochre-bellied Hawk-Owl Ninox ochracea

page 174, Togian Hawk-Owl Ninox burhani

page 174, Cinnabar Hawk-Owl Ninox ios

page 175, Halmahera Hawk-Owl Ninox hypogramma

page 175, Tanimbar Hawk-Owl Ninox forbesi

page 175, Hantu Hawk-Owl Ninox squamipila

page 175, Christmas Island Hawk-Owl Ninox natalis

page 175, Jungle Hawk-Owl Ninox theomacha

page 175, Manus Hawk-Owl Ninox meeki

page 175, Speckled Hawk-Owl Ninox punctulata

page 175, Bismarck Hawk-Owl Ninox variegata

page 175, New Britain Hawk-Owl Ninox odiosa

page 175, Solomons Hawk-Owl Ninox jacquinoti

page 175, Papuan Boobook Uroglaux dimorpha

Three different group names have been used in recent years for species of Ninox: “owl”, “hawk-owl”, and “boobook”. In accord with recent suggestions (King 2002, 2005, Rheindt and Hutchinson 2007), we drop the use of “hawk-owl”, and standardize as “boobook” the group name for all Ninox formerly known as “hawk-owl”. We follow the same approach in revising the English name of the related genus Uroglaux.

Consequently, the English name for Ninox affinis changes from “Andaman Hawk-Owl” to “Andaman Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox sumbaensis changes from “Little Sumba Hawk-Owl” to “Least Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox scutulata changes from “Brown Hawk-Owl” to “Brown Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox ochracea changes from “Ochre-bellied Hawk-Owl” to “Ochre-bellied Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox burhani changes from “Togian Hawk-Owl” to “Togian Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox ios changes from “Cinnabar Hawk-Owl” to “Cinnabar Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox hypogramma changes from “Halmahera Hawk-Owl” to “Halmahera Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox forbesi changes from “Tanimbar Hawk-Owl” to “Tanimbar Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox squamipila changes from “Hantu Hawk-Owl” to “Hantu Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox natalis changes from “Christmas Island Hawk-Owl” to “Christmas Island Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox theomacha changes from “Jungle Hawk-Owl” to “Jungle Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox meeki changes from “Manus Hawk-Owl” to “Manus Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox punctulata changes from “Speckled Hawk-Owl” to “Speckled Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox variegata changes from “Bismark Hawk-Owl” to “Bismark Boobook”.

the English name for Ninox odiosa changes from “New Britain Hawk-Owl” to “New Britain Boobook”;

the English name for Ninox jacquinoti changes from “Solomons Hawk-Owl” to “Solomons Boobook”; and

the English name for Uroglaux dimorpha changes from “Papuan Hawk-Owl” to “Papuan Boobook”.

Additionally, revise the range of Andaman Boobook from “Andaman Islands and Nicobar Islands” to “Andaman Islands”, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005); and revise the range of Least Boobook from “Newly described species from Sumba I. (Lesser Sundas)” to “Sumba I. (Lesser Sundas)”.

References:

King, B. 2002. Species limits in the Brown Boobook Ninox scutulata complex. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 122: 250-257.

King, B. 2005. The song of Cinnabar Hawk Owl Ninox ios in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Forktail 21: 173-174.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Rheindt, F.E., and R.O. Hutchinson. 2007. A photoshot odyssey through the confused avian taxonomy of Seram and Buru (southern Moluccas). BirdingAsia 7: 18-38.

 

pages 176, owlet-nightjars (Aegothelidae)

The sequence of species of Owlet-Nightjars (Aegothelidae) is revised, following Dumbacher et al. (2003). The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Aegotheles savesi        New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles insignis      Feline Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles tatei           Starry Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles wallacii     Wallace’s Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles archboldi   Archbold’s Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles albertisi     Mountain Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles crinifrons   Moluccan Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles cristatus     Australian Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles affinis        Vogelkop Owlet-Nightjar

Aegotheles bennettii    Barred Owlet-Nightjar

Reference:

Dumbacher, J.P., T.K. Pratt, and R.C. Fleishcher. 2003. Phylogeny of the owlet-nightjars (Aves: Aegothelidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 29: 540–549.

 

page 176, Spangled Owlet-Nightjar Aegotheles tatei

Change the English name for Aegotheles tatei from “Spangled Owlet-Nightjar” to “Starry Owlet-Nightjar” (Pratt 2000). Also, revise the range of Starry Owlet-Nightjar from “S New Guinea (lower elevations of Fly River headwaters)” to “lowlands of central and eastern New Guinea”.

Reference:

Pratt, T.K. 2000. Evidence for a previously unrecognized species of owlet-nightjar. Auk 117: 1-11.

 

page 177, Ceylon Frogmouth Batrachostomus moniliger

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Harrison 2011, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name of Batrachostomus moniliger from “Ceylon Frogmouth” to “Sri Lanka Frogmouth”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 179, Diabolical Nightjar Eurostopodus diabolicus

Revise the range description for Diabolical Nightjar (Eurostopodus diabolicus) from “mountains of northern and central Sulawesi” to “montane forests of northern and central Sulawesi”.

 

pages 178-184, Caprimulgidae (Nightjars and Allies)

The sequence of New World nightjars is revised, primarily following the current SACC linear sequence of genera. The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Chordeiles

Lurocalis

Nyctiprogne

Nyctipolus

Systellura

Nyctidromus

Eleothreptus

Uropsalis

Setopagis

Hydropsalis

Macropsalis

Siphonorhis

Nyctiphrynus

Phalaenoptilus

Antrostomus

 

page 181, Blackish Nightjar Caprimulgus nigrescens

page 180, Pygmy Nightjar Caprimulgus hirundinaceus

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year, there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). Blackish Nightjar (Caprimulgus nigrescens) and Pygmy Nightjar (Caprimulgus hirundinaceus) are transferred to the genus Nyctipolus: the scientific name for Blackish Nightjar changes to Nyctipolus nigrescens, and for Pygmy Nightjar to Nyctipolus hirundinaceus.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 180, Band-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus longirostris

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year, there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). Band-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus longirostris is transferred to the monotypic genus Systellura; the scientific name for Band-winged Nightjar changes to Systellura longirostris.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 181, Scrub Nightjar Caprimulgus anthonyi

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year, there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). Scrub Nightjar (Caprimulgus anthonyi) is transferred to the genus Nyctidromus; the scientific name for Scrub Nightjar changes to Nyctidromus anthonyi.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 181, White-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus candicans

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year, there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). White-winged Nightjar (Caprimulgus candicans) is transferred to the genus Eleothreptus; the scientific name for White-winged Nightjar changes to Eleothreptus candicans.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 181, Todd’s Nightjar Caprimulgus heterurus

page 181, Little Nightjar Caprimulgus parvulus

page 181, Roraiman Nightjar Caprimulgus whitelyi

page 181, Cayenne Nightjar Caprimulgus maculosus

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year, there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). Todd’s Nightjar (Caprimulgus heterurus), Little Nightjar (Caprimulgus parvulus), Roraiman Nightjar (Caprimulgus whitelyi), and Cayenne Nightjar (Caprimulgus maculosus) are transferred to the genus Setopagis. The scientific name for Todd’s Nightjar changes to Setopagis heterurus; the scientific name for Little Nightjar changes to Setopagis parvulus; the scientific name for Roraiman Nightjar changes to Setopagis whitelyi; and the scientific name for Cayenne Nightjar changes to Setopagis maculosus.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 181, White-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus cayennensis

page 181, Spot-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus maculicaudus

Continuing the taxonomic revisions to the Caprimulgidae that we initiated last year,

there are further changes to the nomenclature of Neotropical nightjars; these changes follow SACC Proposal 522, based on Han et al. (2010). White-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus cayennensis) and Spot-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus maculicaudus) are transferred to the genus Hydropsalis. The scientific name for White-tailed Nightjar changes to Hydropsalis cayennensis, and the scientific name for Spot-tailed Nightjar changes to Hydropsalis maculicaudus.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 184, Ladder-tailed Nightjar Hydropsalis climacocerca

Revise the range for Hydropsalis climacocerca intercedens, a subspecies of Ladder-tailed Nightjar, from “Central Peru (Obidos region in w Pará)” to “central Brazil (Obidos region in western Pará)”.

 

page 183, Pennant-winged Nightjar Macrodipteryx vexillarius

page 183, Standard-winged Nightjar Macrodipteryx longipennis

Pennant-winged Nightjar (Macrodipteryx vexillarius) and Standard-winged Nightjar (Macrodipteryx longipennis) are embedded within the genus Caprimulgus (Han et al. 2010); the scientific name for Pennant-winged Nightjar changes to Caprimulgus vexillarius, and the scientific name for Standard-winged Nightjar changes to Caprimulgus longipennis.

Reference:

Han, K.-L., M.B. Robbins, and M.J. Braun. 2010. A multi-gene estimate of phylogeny in the nightjars and nighthawks (Caprimulgidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55:443-453.

 

page 178, White-winged Potoo Nyctibius leucopterus

Revise the range of White-winged Potoo (Nyctibius leucopterus) from “N Amazonian Brazil; e Brazil (Bahia)” to “northern Amazonia (northeastern Peru, northern Brazil), and eastern Brazil (Bahia and Espírito Santo)” (Alvarez Alonso and Whitney 2003, Costa et al. 2010).

References:

Alvarez Alonso, J., and B.M. Whitney. 2003. New distributional records of birds from white-sand forests of the northern Peruvian Amazon, with implications for biogeography of northern South America. Condor 105: 552-566.

Costa, T.V.V., C.B. Andretti, T.O. Laranjeiras, and G.A.B. Rosa. 2010. Discovery of White-winged Potoo Nyctibius leucopterus in Espírito Santo, Brazil, with remarks on its distribution and conservation in the Atlantic Forest. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 260-265.

 

page 187, Edible-nest Swiftlet Aerodramus fuciphagus

Change the English name of Aerodramus fuciphagus from “Edible-nest Swiftlet” to “White-nest Swiftlet”. The name “edible-nest swiftlet” is available as a name for the set of two swiflets, White-nest Swiftlet (Aerodramus fuciphagus) and Germain’s Swiftlet (Aerodramus germani), that make nests that are harvested for bird’s-nest soup.

 

page 187, German’s Swiftlet Aerodramus germani

Although the scientific name for this species is spelled “germani“, the species was named in honor of Rodolophe Germain (Oustalet 1876). Consequently, we follow regional authorities (Inskipp et al. 1996, Robson 2000), and revise the English name for the species from “German’s Swiftlet” to “Germain’s Swiftlet”.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Oustalet, E. 1876. Sur une novelle espèce de Salanganes. Bulletin de la Société philomathique de Paris 6th series, volume 13: 1-3.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 190, Forbes-Watson’s Swift Apus berliozi

Revise the range statement for subspecies Apus berliozi bensoni from “Coastal e Somalia; winters to coastal Kenya” to “breeds southern Arabia (southern Yemen and southwest Oman) and coastal Somalia; winters to coastal Kenya”, following Grieve and Kirwan (2012).

Reference:

Grieve, A., and G.M. Kirwan. 2012. Studies of Socotran birds VII. Forbes-Watson’s Swift Apus berliozi in Arabia-the answer to the mystery of the ‘Dhofar swift’. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 194-206.

 

page 191, House Swift  Apus nipalensis

Revise the range of subspecies Apus nipalensis subfurcatus (House Swift) from “Malay Peninsula to Borneo, Sumatra and adjacent islands” to “Malay Peninsula to Borneo, Sumatra and adjacent islands; this species also recently reported from (has recently colonized?) Sulawesi and the Lesser Sundas (Flores, Sumba, Timor), although the subspecific identity of these birds is not yet established”.

 

page 192, Great-billed Hermit Phaethornis malaris

In accord with nomenclatural priority, change the scientific name for the polytypic group Great-billed Hermit (Amazonian) from Phaethornis malaris [bolivianus Group] to Phaethornis malaris [moorei Group].

 

pages 205-206, starfrontlets Coeligena

The sequence of some species of Coeligena (the starfrontlets) is revised, following SACC Proposal 554, based on Parra et al. (2009). The sequence of species that we adopt is:

Coeligena violifer        Violet-throated Starfrontlet

Coeligena iris              Rainbow Starfrontlet

Coeligena phalerata    White-tailed Starfrontlet

Coeligena orina          Dusky Starfrontlet

Coeligena lutetiae       Buff-winged Starfrontlet

Coeligena bonapartei  Golden-bellied Starfrontlet

Coeligena helianthea  Blue-throated Starfrontlet

Reference:

Parra, J.L., J.V. Remsen, Jr., M. Alvarez-Rebolledo, and J.A. McGuire. 2009. Molecular phylogenetics of the hummingbird genus Coeligena. Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution 53: 425–434.

 

page 230, Ceylon Gray Hornbill Ocyceros gingalensis

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Harrison 2011, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name for Ocyceros gingalensis from “Ceylon Gray Hornbill” to “Sri Lanka Gray Hornbill”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 233, Striolated Puffbird Nystalus striolatus

Revise the range of the monotypic group Striolated Puffbird (Natterer’s) (Nystalus striolatus striolatus) from “E Ecuador to e Peru, Bolivia and sw Amazonian Brazil” to “south central Amazonia, in Brazil between the Madeira and Tapajós rivers, and in northeastern Bolivia (Santa Cruz)”.

Revise the range of the monotypic group Striolated Puffbird (Eastern) (Nystalus striolatus torridus) from “E Brazil south of the Amazon (Pará)” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil, south of the Amazon and east of the Tapajós River”.

 

page 241, Guianan Toucanet Selenidera culik

In accord with SACC (Proposal 533), the scientific name of Guianan Toucanet is changed from Selenidera culik to Selenidera piperivora, following Piacentini et al. (2010) and Pacheco and Whitney (2006).

References:

Pacheco, J.F., and B.M. Whitney. 2006. Mandatory changes to the scientific names of three Neotropical birds. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 126: 242-244.

Piacentini, V. de Q., J.F. Pacheco, and B.M. Whitney. 2010. The name Ramphastos piperivorus Linnaeus revisited. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 141-143.

 

page 249, Cardinal Woodpecker Dendropicos fuscescens

The earliest use of the subspecies name intermedius in Dendropicos is for a subspecies of Dendropicos namaquus (Bearded Woodpecker), although Dendropicos namaquus intermedius now usually is considered to be a synonym of Dendropicos namaquus namaquus. Correct the scientific name for this subspecies of Cardinal Woodpecker from Dendropicos fuscescens intermedius to Dendropicos fuscescens natalensis (Dowsett 2012).

Reference:

Dowsett, R.J. 2012. Two pre-occupied names in African ornithology. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 69-70.

 

Pages 251-252, Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Great Spotted Woodpecker (Great Spotted) from Dendrocopus major [major group] to Dendrocopos major [major Group].

 

page 51, American Kestrel Falco sparverius

Revise the range of the monotypic group American Kestrel (Hispaniolan) (Falco sparverius dominicensis) from “Hispaniola” to “Hispaniola and Jamaica” (Bond 1980). (We signalled this change in the notes to the eBird/Clements Checklist 6.7, but failed to implement the revision in the spreadsheet.)

Reference:

Bond, J. 1980. Twenty-third supplement to the Check-list of birds of the West Indes (1956). Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

page 53, Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus

In accord with nomenclatural priority, change the scientific name for the polytypic group Peregrine Falcon (Tundra) from Falco peregrinus tundrius/calidus to Falco peregrinus calidus/tundrius.

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Peregrine Falcon on the Volcano Islands and Bonin Islands from furuitii to fruitii.

Change the English name for the monotypic group Falco peregrinus radama from Peregrine Falcon (Malagasian) to Peregrine Falcon (Malagasy).

 

page 130, Slender-billed Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris

Change the English name for Calyptorhynchus latirostris from “Slender-billed Black-Cockatoo” to Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo”, following Christidis and Boles (2008).

Reference:

Christidis, L. and W.E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

 

page 130, White-tailed Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus baudinii

Change the English name for Calyptorhynchus baudinii from “White-tailed Black-Cockatoo” to “Baudin’s Black-Cockatoo”, following Christidis and Boles (2008).

Reference:

Christidis, L. and W.E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

 

page 133, Meek’s Lorikeet Charmosyna meeki

Meek’s Lorikeet – the English name for Charmosyna meeki – inadvertently was deleted in the eBird/Clements 6.7 spreadsheet.

 

page 140, Ceylon Hanging-Parrot Loriculus beryllinus

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Harrison 2011, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name for Loriculus beryllinus from “Ceylon Hanging-Parrot” to “Sri Lanka Hanging-Parrot”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 145, Painted Parakeet Pyrrhura picta

Subspecies Pyrrhura picta microtera (Painted Parakeet) is considered to be a synonym of Pyrrhura amazonum amazonum (Santarem Parakeet). With the deletion of subspecies microtera, the polytypic group Painted Parakeet (Painted)  becomes a monotypic group, and the scientific name for this group changes from Pyrrhura picta [picta Group] to Pyrrhura picta picta.

 

page 145, Santarem Parakeet Pyrrhura amazonum

Revise the range of the monotypic group Santarem Parakeet (Santarem) Pyrrhura amazonum amazonum from “N-central Brazil (Pará, n Mato Grosso, n Goiás and Maranhão)” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil, south of the Amazaon from the west bank of the Rio Tapajós east to the Rio Tocantins, and on the north bank of the Amazon opposite the mouth of the Rio Tapajós”.

Revise the range of the monotypic group Santarem Parakeet (Madeira) Pyrrhura amazonum snethlageae from “Drainage of Rio Madeira in s Brazil and n Bolivia” to “Drainage of the Rio Madeira in Brazil and northern Bolivia”.

Add subspecies Pyrrhura amazonum lucida, described by Arndt 2008, with range “northern Mato Grosso, Brazil (along the rios Teles Peres and Peixote de Azuvedo”. This subspecies originally was described as Pyrrhura snethlageae lucida. We also recognize lucida as a new monotypic group, Santarem Parakeet (Cristalino) Pyrrhura amazonum lucida.

Reference:

Arndt, T. 2008. Anmerkungen zu einigen Pyrrhura-Formen mit der Beschreibung einer neuen Art und zweier neuer Unterarten. Papageien 8: 278-286.

 

Page 145, Rose-fronted Parakeet Pyrrhura roseifrons

Add subspecies Pyrrhura roseifrons dilutissima, described by Arndt 2008, with range “Apurímac Valley, south central Peru”; this subspecies originally was described as Pyrrhura peruviana dilutissima. We also include subspecies dilutissima in the group Rose-fronted Parakeet (Wavy-breasted); consequently, this becomes a polyphyletic group, and its scientific name changes from Pyrrhura roseifrons peruviana to Pyrrhura roseifrons peruviana/dilutissima.

Revise the range of Pyrrhura roseifrons peruviana from “Disjunct in se Ecuador and n Peru; s-central Peru (Junín)” to “foothills of the Andes in southeastern Ecuador (Morona-Santiago) and northern Peru (Amazonas and western Loreto)”.

Add subspecies Pyrrhura roseifrons parvifrons, described by Arndt 2008, with range “Two disjunct regions in northern Peru: in eastern San Martín and adjacent west central Loreto, and along the Amazon in northeastern Loreto (only on the south bank of the Amazon?)”. This subspecies originally was described as a species, Pyrrhura parvifrons, and is treated by eBird/Clements as a new monotypic group, Rose-fronted Parakeet (Garlepp’s).

Revise the range of Rose-fronted Parakeet (Rose-fronted) Pyrrhura roseifrons roseifrons from “Disjunct in w Amazonia (w Brazil; n-central Peru and Bolivia)” to “western Amazonia, south of the Amazon, from northern Peru south to northern Bolivia (La Paz) and in western Brazil (western Amazonas)”.

Reference:

Arndt, T. 2008. Anmerkungen zu einigen Pyrrhura-Formen mit der Beschreibung einer neuen Art und zweier neuer Unterarten. Papageien 8: 278-286.

 

page 700, Glaucous Macaw Anodorhynchus glaucus

Revise the range of Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus) from “Formerly s Brazil and adj. Uruguay. Extinct; last reported 1915” to “formerly southern Brazil, southern Paraguay, northeastern Uruguay, and northern Argentina. Possibly extinct”.

 

page 142, Red-and-green Macaw Ara chloropterus

Revise the range of Red-and-green Macaw (Ara chloropterus) from “Humid e Panama to Brazil, e Peru, ne Bolivia and Paraguay” to “eastern Panama south, east of the Andes, to Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay; formerly also northeastern Argentina”.

 

page 149, parrots Pionus

The sequence of species of the Neotropical genus Pionus parrots is revised, following SACC Proposal 531, which is based on Ribas et al. (2007). The sequence of species that we adopt is:

Pionus fuscus              Dusky Parrot

Pionus sordidus           Red-billed Parrot

Pionus maximiliani     Scaly-headed Parrot

Pionus tumultuosus     Speckle-faced Parrot

Pionus senilis              White-crowned Parrot

Pionus chalcopterus    Bronze-winged Parrot

Reference:

Ribas, C.C., R.G. Moyle, C.Y. Miyaki, and J. Cracraft. 2007. The assembly of montane biotas: linking Andean tectonics and climate oscillations to independent regimes of diversification in Pionus parrots. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 274: 2399-2408.

 

pages 149-150, parrots Amazona

SACC (Proposal 532) revised the linear sequence of the South American species of Amazona, following Ottens-Wainwright et al. (2004) and Russello and Amato (2004). We adopt the SACC linear sequence, and have inserted the Central American and Antillean taxa into this arrangement (although NACC has yet to take up consideration of the linear sequence of Amazona). The sequence of species that we adopt is:

Amazona vinacea                Vinaceous-breasted Parrot

Amazona tucumana            Tucuman Parrot

Amazona pretrei                  Red-spectacled Parrot

Amazona viridigenalis        Red-crowned Parrot

Amazona finschi                  Lilac-crowned Parrot

Amazona autumnalis           Red-lored Parrot

Amazona dufresniana         Blue-cheeked Parrot

Amazona rhodocorytha      Red-browed Parrot

Amazona arausiaca            Red-necked Parrot

Amazona versicolor            St. Lucia Parrot

Amazona auropalliata         Yellow-naped Parrot

Amazona oratrix                 Yellow-headed Parrot

Amazona ochrocephala      Yellow-crowned Parrot

Amazona barbadensis         Yellow-shouldered Parrot

Amazona aestiva                 Turquoise-fronted Parrot

Amazona agilis                    Black-billed Parrot

Amazona albifrons              White-fronted Parrot

Amazona xantholora           Yellow-lored Parrot

Amazona collaria                Yellow-billed Parrot

Amazona leucocephala       Cuban Parrot

Amazona ventralis               Hispaniolan Parrot

Amazona vittata                  Puerto Rican Parrot

Amazona farinosa               Mealy Parrot

Amazona kawalli                 Kawall’s Parrot

Amazona imperialis            Imperial Parrot

Amazona brasiliensis          Red-tailed Parrot

Amazona guildingii             St. Vincent Parrot

Amazona amazonica           Orange-winged Parrot

Amazona mercenarius                    Scaly-naped Parrot

References:

Ottens-Wainwright, P., K.E. Halanych, J.R. Ebarhard, R.I. Burke, J.W. Wiley, R.S. Gnam, and X.G. Aquilera. 2004. Independent geographic origins of the genus Amazona in the West Indies. Journal of Caribbean Ornithology — Special Issue Honoring Nedra Klein 23-49.

Russello, M.A., and G. Amato. 2004. A molecular phylogeny of Amazona: implications for Neotropical parrot biogeography, taxonomy, and conservation. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 30: 421–437.

 

page 150, Yellow-naped Parrot Amazona auropalliata

Revise the range statement for subspecies Amazona auropalliata auropalliata from “Bay Islands off Honduras (Isla Barbareta and Isla Guanaja)” to “Pacific slope of southern Mexico (Oaxaca) south to northwestern Costa Rica”.

 

pages 347, 700, Bush Wren Xenicus longipes

Correct the date of extinction for subspecies Xenicus longipes stokesii from 1850 to 1949.

Revise the range for subspecies Xenicus longipes longipes from “Montane forests of South I. (New Zealand). Probably extinct” to “Montane forests of South I. (New Zealand). Extinct”, with extinction date of 1972.

Revise the range for subspecies Xenicus longipes variabilis from “Small islands off Stewart I. (New Zealand). Probably extinct” to “Small islands off Stewart I. (New Zealand). Extinct”, with extinction date of 1965.

 

page 267, Red-bellied Pitta Pitta erythrogaster

Correct the spelling of the name of a subspecies of Red-bellied Pitta from mackloti to macklotii.

 

page 298, Rufous-rumped Antwren Terenura callinota

page 298, Chestnut-shouldered Antwren Terenura humeralis

page 298, Yellow-rumped Antwren Terenura sharpei

page 298, Ash-winged Antwren Terenura spodioptila

In accord with SACC Proposal 557 and NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), the four species of Terenura antwrens are is transferred to the genus Euchrepomis, and Euchrepomis is positioned at the beginning of the linear sequence of Typical Antbirds (Thamnophilidae); these changes are based on Bravo et al. (2012).

References:

Bravo, G.A., J.V. Remsen, Jr., B.M. Whitney, and R.T. Brumfield. 2012. DNA sequence data reveal a subfamily-level divergence within Thamnophilidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 287–293.

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 292, Western Slaty-Antshrike Thamnophilus atrinucha

In accord with SACC (Proposal 570) and NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), change the English name of Thamnophilus atrinucha from Western Slaty-Antshrike to Black-crowned Antshrike.

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 295, Star-throated Antwren Myrmotherula gularis

In accord with SACC (Proposal 563), following Belmonte-Lopes et al. (2012), Star-throated Antwren is moved from the genus Myrmotherula to the monotypic genus Rhopias. Rhopias gularis is moved to a new position, immediately following Acre Antshrike (Thamnophilus divisorius).

Reference:

Belmonte-Lopes,R., G.A. Bravo, M.R. Bornschein, G.N. Maurício, M.R. Pie, and R.T. Brumfield. 2012. Genetic and morphological data support placement of Myrmotherula gularis (Spix) in the monotypic genus Rhopias Cabanis and Heine (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae). Zootaxa 3451: 1-16.

 

page 293, Rondonia Bushbird Clytoctantes atrogularis

Revise the range of Rondonia Bushbird (Clytoctantes atrogularis) from “Locally in sw Amazonian Brazil (e Rondônia)” to “south central Amazonian Brazil, in Rondônia, southern Amazonas, and northern Mato Grosso” (Guilherme and Santos 2013, and references therein).

Reference:

Guilherme, E., and G.S. Santos. 2013. A new locality and habitat type for Rondônia Bushbird Clytoctantes atrogularis. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 133: 68-71.

 

page 293, Spot-winged Antshrike Pygiptila stellaris

Insert two previously overlooked subspecies of Spot-winged Antshrike:

Add subspecies Pygiptila stellaris maculipennis immediately following the species heading Spot-winged Antshrike (Pygiptila stellaris), with range “southeastern Colombia south to central Peru”.

Add subspecies Pygiptila stellaris purusiana immediately following subspecies Pygiptila stellaris occipitalis; the range of purusiana is “southeastern Peru, northern Bolivia, and west central Brazil south of the Amazon, east to the Madeira River”.

 

page 295, Stipple-throated Antwren Epinecrophylla haematonota

Revise the range of subspecies Epinecrophylla haematonota amazonica from “S-central Amazonian Brazil and n Bolivia (Pando)” to “south central Amazonian Brazil (west of the Madeira River) and northern Bolivia (Pando)”.

 

page 295, Ihering’s Antwren Myrmotherula iheringi

Revise the range of subspecies Myrmotherula iheringi heteroptera from “SW Amazonian Brazil to se Peru (Madre de Dios) and nw Bolivia” to “southwestern Amazonian Brazil, west of the Madeira River in Amazonas and western Acre, and adjacent east central Peru”.

Revise the range of subspecies Myrmotherula iheringi iheringi from “S-central Amazonian Brazil” to “south central Amazonian Brazil between the Madeira and Tapajós rivers”.

 

page 297, Parana Antwren Stymphalornis acutirostris

Revise the range of Parana Antwren (Stymphalornis acutirostris) from “Coastal se Brazil (Paraná and extreme ne Santa Catarina)” to “southeastern Brazil (São Paulo) and southern Brazil (Paraná and extreme northeastern Santa Catarina)”.

 

Page 300, genus Hypocnemis

In accord with SACC, reposition all species of Hypocnemis antbirds to follow placed immediately after Drymophila antbirds.

 

page 300,  Spix’s Warbling-Antbird Hypocnemis striata

Revise the range of subspecies implicata from “S-cent. Amazonian Brazil (lower R. Madeira to R. Tapajós)” to “south central Amazonian Brazil, from the Madeira/Aripuanã rivers east to the Tapajós River”.

 

page 302, Xingu Scale-backed Antbird Willisornis vidua

Revise the range of subspecies nigrigula from “S-central Amazonian Brazil” to “south central Amazonian Brazil, from the east bank for the Rio Canumã to both banks of Rio Tapajos, and the east bank of the Rio Teles Pires”.

 

page 306, Brown-banded Antpitta Grallaria milleri

Insert a new subspecies of Brown-banded Antpitta, Grallaria milleri gilesi, immediately following the species heading Grallaria milleri, with range “northern Central Andes of Colombia (Antioquia); known from a single 19th century specimen, probably extinct” (Salaman et al. 2009).

Revise the range of nominate milleri from “W slope of Cent. Andes of Colombia (Caldas, Risaralda, Quindío)” to “central portion of the Central Andes of Colombia (Caldas, Risaralda, Quindío, and Tolima)”.

 

page 304, Spotted Antpitta Hylopezus macularius

Correct the spelling of the English name for the monotypic group Hylopezus macularius paraensis from “Spotted Antpitta (Snethlages)” to “Spotted Antpitta (Snethlage’s)”.

 

page 285, Wedge-billed Woodcreeper Glyphorynchus spirurus

Correct the spelling of the name of a subspecies of Wedge-billed Woodcreeper from pararensis to paraensis.

 

page 286, Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper Dendrocolaptes certhia

Revise the range of the monotypic group Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Plain-colored) (Dendrocolaptes certhia concolor) from “S Amazonian Brazil s of Amazon to Mato Grosso and ne Bolivia” to “south central Amazonia, in Brazil between the Madeira and Tapajós rivers, and in northeastern Bolivia (Santa Cruz)”.

Following Batista et al. (2013), we recognize ridgwayi Hellmayr 1905 as a valid taxon, and include this subspecies as a new monotypic group, Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Ridgway’s) Dendrocolaptes certhia ridgwayi, with range “eastern Amazonian Brazil, between the rios Tapajós and Xingu”. Insert ridgwayi immediately following Dendrocolaptes certhia concolor.

Revise the range of the monotyic group Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Todd’s) (Dendrocolaptes certhia medius) from “SE Amazonia s of Amazon (Rio Tocantins to nw Maranhão)” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil, east of the Tocantins River; also an isolated population in northeastern Brazil (Alagoas, Pernambuco)”.

References:

Batista, R., A. Aleixo, M. Vallinoto, L. Azevedo, P. S. de Rêgo, L.F. Silveira, I. Sampaio, and H. Schneider. 2013. Molecular systematics and taxonomic revision of the Amazonian Barred Woodcreeper complex (Dendrocolaptes certhia: Dendrocolaptidae), with description of a new species from the Xingu-Tocantins interfluve. Pages 245-247 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Hellmayr, C.E. 1905. Notes on a collection of birds, made by Mons. A. Robert in the District of Pará. Novitates Zoologicae 12: 269-305.

 

page 287, Ocellated Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus ocellatus

Change the scientific name for subspecies of Ocellated Woodcreeper of northwestern Amazonia from Xiphorhynchus ocellatus weddellii to Xiphorhynchus ocellatus beauperthuysii (Penhallurick and Aleixo 2008).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and A. Aleixo. 2008. The correct name of the population of Xiphornynchus ocellatus (von Spix, 1824) recently named weddellii (Des Murs, 1855). Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 133-136.

 

page 287, Buff-throated Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus guttatus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the group Buff-throated Woodcreeper (Lafresnaye’s) from Xiphorhynchus guttatus guttatus/dorbignyanus to Xiphorhynchus guttatus guttatoides/dorbignyanus.

 

page 289, Curve-billed Scythebill Campylorhamphus procurvoides

Revise the range of subspecies Campylorhamphus procurvoides sanus from “Trop. se Colombia to ne Peru, Venezuela, n Guyana and n Brazil” to “northwestern Amazonia, from Venezuela and Brazil (west of the Branco and Negro rivers) west to Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru north of the Amazon”.

Revise the range of the nominate subspecies, Campylorhamphus procurvoides procurvoides, from “Suriname, French Guiana and adj. Brazil north of the Amazon” to “eastern Venezuela to the Guianas and northern Brazil (east of the Branco and Negro rivers)”.

Revise the range of subspecies Campylorhamphus procurvoides multostriatus from “SE Amazonian Brazil (Rio Tapajós to Rio Tocantins)” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil between the Xingu and Tocantins rivers”.

 

page 289, Lineated Woodcreeper Lepidocolaptes albolineatus

Revise the range of the nominate subspecies, Lepidocolaptes albolineatus albolineatus, from “E Venezuela (Bolívar) to the Guianas and n Brazil” to “eastern Venezuela (Monaguas, Bolívar) to the Guianas and northern Brazil (east of the Branco and Negro rivers)”.

Revise the range of subspecies Lepidocolaptes albolineatus duida from “E Colombia, s Venezuela (Amazonas) and nw Brazil” to “northwestern Amazonia, from Venezuela and Brazil (west of the Branco and Negro rivers) west to Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru north of the Amazon”.

Subspecies Lepidocolaptes albolineatus madeirae is considered a synonym of fuscicapillus, and no longer is recognized. Revise the range of Lepidocolaptes albolineatus fuscicapillus from “Amazonian Ecuador to Peru, e Bolivia and s Amazonian Brazil” to “south central Amazonia, in Brazil between the Madeira and Tapajós rivers, and in northern Bolivia (Beni, Santa Cruz)”.

Revise the range of subspecies Lepidocolaptes albolineatus layardi from “SE Amazonian Brazil south of the Amazon” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil, east of the Tapajós River”.

 

Page 269, Long-tailed Cinclodes Cinclodes pabsti

Freitas et al. (2012) described a new Cinclodes, espinhacensis, from southeastern Brazil. Although described as a species, this new taxon was accepted by SACC as a subspecies of Long-tailed Cinclodes (Cinclodes pabstii) (see SACC Proposal 548). The range of Cinclodes pabstii espinhacensis is “east central Brazil (Serra do Espinhaço Meridional, Minas Gerais)”.

Reference:

Freitas, G.H.S., A.V. Chaves, L.M. Costa, F.R. Santos, and M. Rodrigues. 2012. A new species of Cinclodes from the Espinhaço Range, southeastern Brazil: insights into the biogeographical history of the South American highlands. Ibis 154: 738-755.

 

page 283, Sharp-billed Treehunter Heliobletus contaminatus

With the description of Heliobletus contaminatus camargoi, Sharp-billed Treehunter no longer is monotypic. Insert Heliobletus contaminatus contaminatus immediately following the species heading, and revise the range from “E Paraguay to se Brazil (Espírito Santo) and ne Argentina” to “southeastern Brazil (Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro); intergrades with camargoi in eastern São Paulo”.

Insert the recently described subspecies Heliobletus contaminatus camargoi immediately following Heliobletus contaminatus contaminatus; the range of subspecies camargoi is “southern Brazil (south and west of the city of São Paulo), eastern Paraguay, and northeastern Argentina” (da Silva and Stotz 1992).

Reference:

da Silva, J.M.C., and D.F. Stotz. 1992. Geographic variation in the Sharp-billed Treehunter Heliobletus contaminatus. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 112: 98-101.

 

page 280, Rufous-tailed Foliage-gleaner Philydor ruficaudatum

page 280, Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner Philydor lichtensteini

In accord with SACC (Proposal 527), following Derryberry et al. (2011), Rufous-tailed Foliage-gleaner and Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner are moved from the genus Philydor to Anabacerthia. The scientific name of Rufous-tailed Foliage-gleaner changes from Philydor ruficaudatum to Anabacerthia ruficaudata, and the scientific name of Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner changes from Philydor lichtensteini to Anabacerthia lichtensteini. Position Rufous-tailed Foliage-gleaner immediately following Montane Foliage-gleaner (Anabacerthia striaticollis), and position Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner immediately following White-browed Foliage-gleaner (Anabacerthia amaurotis).

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.vDerryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973–2986.

 

page 279, Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla rufosuperciliata

Revise the range of subspecies Syndactyla rufosuperciliata oleaginea from “SE Bolivia and ne Argentina” to “southeastern Bolivia and northwestern Argentina.

 

page 280, Peruvian Recurvebill Simoxenops ucayalae

page 280, Bolivian Recurvebill Simoxenops striatus

In accord with SACC (Proposal 528), following Derryberry et al. (2011), the genus Simoxenops is merged with Syndactyla. As a result, the scientific name for Peruvian Recurvebill changes from Simoxenops ucayalae to Syndactyla ucayalae, and the the scientific name for Bolivian Recurvebill changes from Simoxenops striatus to Syndactyla striatus.

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.vDerryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973–2986.

 

page 270, Tawny Tit-Spinetail Leptasthenura yanacensis

Revise the range of Tawny Tit-Spinetail (Leptasthenura yanacensis) from “Locally in Andes of n Peru and w Bolivia” to “locally in Andes of central and southeastern Peru, Bolivia, and northwestern Argentina (Jujuy, Salta)”.

 

page 277, Cipo Canastero Asthenes luizae

Revise the range of Cipo Canastero (Asthenes luizae) from “Interior se Brazil (Serra do Cipó in Minas Gerais)” to “east central Brazil (Serra do Espinhaço in Minas Gerais)”.

 

page 274, Red-shouldered Spinetail Gyalophylax hellmayri

In accord with SACC (Proposal 529), following Derryberry et al. (2011), the monotypic genus Gyalophylax is merged into Synallaxis. The scientific name for Red-shouldered Spinetail changes from Gyalophylax hellmayri to Synallaxis hellmayri. Position Red-shouldered Spinetail immediately following Silvery-throated Spinetail (Synallaxis subpudica).

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.vDerryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973–2986.

 

page 274, Great Spinetail Siptornopsis hypochondriaca

In accord with SACC (Proposal 529), following Derryberry et al. (2011), the monotypic genus Siptornopsis is merged into Synallaxis. The scientific name for Great Spinetail changes from Siptornopsis hypochondriaca to Synallaxis hypochondriaca. Position Great Spinetail immediately following Marañon Spinetail (Synallaxis maranonica).

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.vDerryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973–2986.

 

page 274, White-whiskered Spinetail Synallaxis candei

In the eBird/Clements Checklist spreadsheet 6.7 (August 2013), the entry for the species White-whiskered Spinetail (Synallaxis candei) inadvertently was sandwiched between the entry for the species Rufous-breasted Spinetail (Synallaxis erythrothorax) and the subspecies of Rufous-breasted Spinetail. We correct this mistake, and move the entry for the species White-whiskered Spinetail to its proper place, following the subspecies of Rufous-breasted Spinetail and before the three subspecies of White-whiskered Spinetail.

 

page 322, Agile Tit-Tyrant Anairetes agilis

page 322, Unstreaked Tit-Tyrant Anairetes agraphia

In accord with SACC (Proposal 525), primarily following DuBay and Witt (2012), Agile Tit-Tyrant and Unstreaked Tit-tyrant are transferred from the genus Anairetes to Uromyias. The scientific name for Agile Tit-Tyrant changes from Anairetes agilis to Uromyias agilis, and the scientific name for Unstreaked Tit-Tyrant changes from Anairetes agraphia to Uromyias agraphia.

Reference:

DuBay, S.G., and C.C Witt. 2012. An improved phylogeny of the Andean tit-tyrants (Aves, Tyrannidae): More characters trump sophisticated analyses. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 285-296.

 

page 324, Paltry Tyrannulet Zimmerius vilissimus

Rheindt et al. (2013) showed that subspecies petersi is genetically distinct from other members of the group Paltry Tyrannulet (Venezuelan) (Zimmerius vilissimus [improbus Group]). We recognize petersi as a new monotypic group, Paltry Tyrannulet (Venezuelan) (Zimmerius vilissimus petersi). With the removal of petersi, the Engish and scientific names of the group Paltry Tyrannulet (Venezuelan) (Zimmerius vilissimus [improbus Group]) change to Paltry Tyrannulet (Mountain) (Zimmerius vilissimus improbus/tamae).

Reference:

Rheindt, F.E., A.M. Cuervo, and R.T. Brumfield. 2013. Rampant polyphyly indicates cryptic diversity in a clade of Neotropical flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 108: 889–900.

 

page 324, Mishana Tyrannulet Zimmerius villarejoi

Revise the range of Mishana Tyrannulet (Zimmerius villarejoi) from “White sand varillal forests of ne Peru in Iquitos region” to “”Two disjunct regions in northern Peru: in the Río Mayo Valley

and along the adjacent Río Huallaga (San Martín); and in the Río Nanay drainage (Loreto)”.

 

page 328, White-cheeked Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus albifacies

Revise the range of White-cheeked Tody-Flycatcher from “SE Peru (s Madre de Dios and adjacent ne Cuzco)” to “southeastern Peru (Madre de Dios and Cuzco), western Brazil (Acre), and northern Bolivia (Pando)” (Tobias and Seddon 2007, Zimmer et al. 2010).

References:

Tobias, J.A., and N. Seddon. 2007. Nine bird species new to Bolivia and notes on other significant records. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 127: 49-84.

Zimmer, K.J., A. Whittaker, E. Guilherme, and P. Martuscelli.  2010. Documented records of White-cheeked Tody-Tyrant Poecilotriccus albifacies from Acre, Brazil. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 255-259.

 

page 330, Yellow-margined Flycatcher Tolmomyias assimilis

Revise the range of the nominate subspecies, Tolmomyias assimilis assimilis, from “Cent. Brazil (e Amazonas to Rio Tapajós in w Pará)” to “central Brazil, south of the Amazon, east to the Canumã/Sucunduri rivers”.

 

pages 314-318, Manakins Pipridae

The sequence of some genera of Manakins (Pipridae) is revised, following SACC Proposal 534, based on Rego et al. (2007), Tello et al. (2009), McKay et al. (2010), and references cited therein. The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Neopelma

Tyranneutes

Ilicura

Masius

Corapipo

Antilophia

Chiroxiphia

Xenopipo

Machaeropterus

Dixiphia

Ceratopipra

Manacus

Heterocercus

Pipra

Lepidothrix

References:

McKay, B.D., F.K. Barker, H.L. Mays, Jr., S.M. Doucet, and G.E. Hill. 2010. A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the manakins (Aves: Pipridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 733-737.

Rego, P. S., J. Araripe, M.L.V. Marceliano, I. Sampaio, and H. Schneider. 2007. Phylogenetic analyses of the genera Pipra, Lepidothrix and Dixiphia (Pipridae, Passeriformes) using partial cytochrome b and 16S mtDNA genes. Zoologica Scripta 2007: 1-11.

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009.   Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467.

 

page 315, White-crowned Manakin Pipra pipra

White-crowned Manakin (Pipra pipra) is transferred to the genus Dixiphia,, following SACC Proposal 534, based on Rego et al. (2007), Tello et al. (2009), McKay et al. (2010), and references cited therein. The scientific name of White-crowned Manakin becomes Dixiphia pipra.

References:

McKay, B.D., F.K. Barker, H.L. Mays, Jr., S.M. Doucet, and G.E. Hill. 2010. A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the manakins (Aves: Pipridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 733-737.

Rego, P. S., J. Araripe, M.L.V. Marceliano, I. Sampaio, and H. Schneider. 2007. Phylogenetic analyses of the genera Pipra, Lepidothrix and Dixiphia (Pipridae, Passeriformes) using partial cytochrome b and 16S mtDNA genes. Zoologica Scripta 2007: 1-11.

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009.   Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467.

 

page 315, Scarlet-horned Manakin Pipra cornuta

page 315, Red-capped Manakin Pipra mentalis

page 315, Golden-headed Manakin Pipra erythrocephala

page 315, Red-headed Manakin Pipra rubrocapilla

page 315, Round-tailed Manakin Pipra chloromeros

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Pipra cornuta), Red-capped Manakin (Pipra mentalis), Golden-headed Manakin ( Pipra erythrocephala), Red-headed Manakin (Pipra rubrocapilla), and Round-tailed Manakin (Pipra chloromeros) are transferred to the genus Ceratopipra, following SACC Proposal 534, based on Rego et al. (2007), Tello et al. (2009), McKay et al. (2010), and references cited therein. The scientific name for Scarlet-horned Manakin changes to Ceratopipra cornuta, the scientific name for Red-capped Manakin changes to Ceratopipra mentalis, the scientific name for Golden-headed Manakin changes to Ceratopipra erythrocephala, the scientific name for Red-headed Manakin changes to Ceratopipra rubrocapilla, and the scientific name for Round-tailed Manakin changes to Ceratopipra chloromeros.

References:

McKay, B.D., F.K. Barker, H.L. Mays, Jr., S.M. Doucet, and G.E. Hill. 2010. A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the manakins (Aves: Pipridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 733-737.

Rego, P. S., J. Araripe, M.L.V. Marceliano, I. Sampaio, and H. Schneider. 2007. Phylogenetic analyses of the genera Pipra, Lepidothrix and Dixiphia (Pipridae, Passeriformes) using partial cytochrome b and 16S mtDNA genes. Zoologica Scripta 2007: 1-11.

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009.   Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467.

 

page 318, Rufous -winged Schiffornis Schiffornis stenorhyncha

In accord with SACC (Proposal 543A) and NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), the English name for Schiffornis stenorhyncha changes from Rufous-winged Schiffornis to Russet-winged Schiffornis.

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C.

Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 517, Gray Grasswren Amytornis barbatus

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Gray Grasswren that occurs along the lower Diamantina River from diamantine to diamantina.

 

page 560, Yellow-faced Honeyeater Lichenostomus chrysops

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Yellow-faced Honeyeater of northeastern Queensland from baroni to barroni.

 

page 561, Yellow Honeyeater Lichenostomus flavus

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Yellow Honeyeater of central Queensland from addensus to addendus.

 

page 566, Yellow-throated Miner Manorina flavigula

Delete the entry for subspecies Manorina flavigula melanotis, with range “Murray mallee of se NSW, nw Victoria and e South Australia”; this is a synonym of Black-eared Miner (Manorina melanotis). Replace this entry with Manorina flavigula flavigula, with range “north central Queensland to nw Victoria and se South Australia”.

 

page 565, Dark-eared Myza Myza celebensis

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Dark-eared Myza of southern Sulawesi from meriodionalis to meridionalis.

 

page 517, Rufous Bristlebird Dasyornis broadbenti

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the extinct subspecies of Rufous Bristlebird of southwestern Western Australia from littoralis to litoralis.

 

Page 483, Goldenface Pachycare flavogriseum

Insert the recently described subspecies Pachycare flavogriseum lecroyae immediately following Pachycare flavogriseum flavogriseum; the range of subspecies lecroyae is “northern New Guinea (Bewani and Torricelli Mountains)” (Beehler and Prawiradilaga 2010).

Reference:

Beehler, B.M., and D.M. Prawiradilaga. 2010. New taxa and new records of birds from the north coastal ranges of New Guinea. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 277-285.

 

page 517, Mountain Mouse-Warbler Crateroscelis robusta

Insert the recently described subspecies Crateroscelis robusta diamondi immediately following Crateroscelis robusta peninsularis; the range of subspecies diamondi is “northern New Guinea (Foja Mountains)” (Beehler and Prawiradilaga 2010).

Reference:

Beehler, B.M., and D.M. Prawiradilaga. 2010. New taxa and new records of birds from the north coastal ranges of New Guinea. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 277-285.

 

page 545, Dwarf Honeyeater Toxorhamphus iliolophus

Dwarf Honeyeater is transferred from the genus Toxorhamphus to Oedistoma; the scientific name changes from Toxorhamphus iliolophus to Oedistoma iliolophum. With this transfer, the scientific name for the nominate subspecies changes from iliolophus to iliolophum (we failed to implement this change in the eBird/Clements Checklist 6.8 spreadsheet, but iliolophum of course is the correct spelling); and spelling of the subspecies name flavus changes to flavum.

 

page 545, Pygmy Honeyeater Toxorhamphus pygmaeum

Pygmy Honeyeater is transferred from the genus Toxorhamphus to Oedistoma; the scientific name changes from Toxorhamphus pygmaeum to Oedistoma pygmaeum. We failed to implement this change in the eBird/Clements Checklist 6.8 spreadsheet (column E, Scientific name), although this change is described correctly in column B (2013 Text for website), and is what we intended.

 

page 468, White-tailed Shrike Lanioturdus torquatus

White-tailed Shrike (Lanioturdus torquatus) is moved to a position at the base (beginning) of the wattle-eyes and batises (Platysteiridae), following Fuchs et al. (2004, 2012).

References:

Fuchs, J., R.C.K. Bowie, J. Fjeldså, and E. Pasquet. 2004. Phylogenetic relationships of the African bush-shrikes and helmet-shrikes (Passeriformes: Malaconotidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 33: 428–439.

Fuchs, J., M. Irestedt, J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, E. Pasquet, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2012. Molecular phylogeny of African bush-shrikes and allies: tracing the biogeographic history of an explosive radiation of corvoid birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 93-105.

 

page 467, Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye Platysteira concreta

Revise the range of the monotypic group Platysteira concreta kungwensis (Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye) from “Extreme w Tanzania (Mt. Nkungwe and Mt. Mahari)” to “Extreme w Tanzania (Mt. Nkungwe and Mt. Mahali)”.

 

page 576, Chestnut-bellied Helmetshrike Prionops caniceps

Change the English name for Prionops caniceps from “Chestnut-bellied Helmetshrike” to “Red-billed Helmetshrike”, in accord with recent literature (e.g. Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Fry et al. 2000, Borrow and Demey 2001).

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Fry, C.H., S. Keith, and E.K. Urban (editors). 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, London.

Borrow, N., and R. Demey. 2001. A guide to birds of western Africa. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 577, Blue Vanga Cyanolanius madagascarinus

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Cyanolanius madagascarinus madagascarinus from Blue Vanga (Madagscar) to Blue Vanga (Madagascar).

 

page 573, Black-crowned Tchagra Tchagra senegalus

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Black-crowned Tchagra of northern Somalia from wardangliensis to warsangliensis.

 

page 582, Pied Currawong Strepera graculina

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of southeastern Australia from nebuloas to nebulosa.

 

page 582, Black Currawong Strepera fuliginosa

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Flinders Island (Bass Strait) from pervior to parvior.

 

page 370, White-bellied Cuckooshrike Coracina papuensis

Correct the range statement for subspecies timorlaoensis from “Tanimbr Islands (Banda Sea)” to “Tanimbar Islands (Banda Sea)”.

 

page 371, Pale Cicadabird Edolisoma ceramense

Under subspecies hoogerwerfi, correct the spelling of the species name from ceramensis to ceramense.

 

page 487, Rufous Shrike-Thrush Colluricincla megarhyncha

Correct the spelling of the name of the subspecies of Rufous Shrike-Thrush of eastern Queensland, Australia from gouldi to gouldii.

 

page 484, Rusty-breasted Whistler Pachycephala fulvotincta

Revise the range statement for subspecies fulvotincta from “E Lesser Sundas” to “western Lesser Sundas (Sumbawa to Alor)” (White and Bruce 1986).

Reference:

White, C.M.N., and M.D. Bruce. 1986. The Birds of Wallacea. (Sulawesi, The Moluccas & Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia). British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 7. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

 

page 484, Gray Whistler Pachycephala simplex

Revise the range statement for subspecies simplex from “N Northern Territory (Melville and Bathhurst Is., Arnhem Land)” to “n Northern Territory, Melville I., and Groote Eylandt”.

 

page 486, White-breasted Whistler Pachycephala lanioides

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the subspecies of central Western Australia from carnaroni to carnarvoni.

 

page 571, Gray-backed Fiscal Lanius excubitoroides

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Gray-backed Fiscal from Lanius excubitoroides to Lanius excubitorius, following David et al. (2009).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

page 510, White-bellied Erpornis Erpornis zantholeuca

Correct the spelling of subspecies tyrannula to tyrannulus.

 

page 623, Brown-capped Vireo Vireo leucophrys

Subspecies Vireo leucophrys disjunctus is deleted; it is considered to be a synonym of Vireo leucophrys dissors (Olson 1981).

Reference:

Olson, S.L. 1981. Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373.

 

page 624, Dusky-capped Greenlet Hylophilus hypoxanthus

In the eBird/Clements 6.7 spreadsheet, subspecies Hylophilus hypoxanthus inornatus was out of sequence; we restore its intended position, between Hylophilus hypoxanthus albigula and Hylophilus muscicapinus (Buff-cheeked Greenlet).

 

page 625, Green Shrike-Vireo Vireolanius pulchellus

Add a recently described subspecies, Vireolanius pulchellus ramosi Phillips 1991, with range “southeastern Mexico (Veracruz, Oaxaca, and northern Chiapas)”; see also Dickerman and Parkes (1996). Subspecies ramosi is inserted immediately following the heading for the species.

Revise the range of subspecies Vireolanius pulchellus pulchellus from “Gulf-Caribbean lowlands of se Mexico to Honduras” to “Gulf-Caribbean lowlands of se Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Honduras; also local on Pacific slope of sw Mexico (Chiapas), Guatemala, and El Salvador”.

Revise the range of subspecies Vireolanius pulchellus verticalis from “Caribbean slope of Nicaragua and Costa Rica” to “Caribbean slope of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and western Panama”.

Revise the range of subspecies Vireolanius pulchellus viridiceps from “Pacific slope of Costa Rica and w Panama” to “Pacific slope of Costa Rica and w Panama, and both Caribbean and Pacific slopes of central Panama”.

References:

Dickerman, R.W., and K.C.Parkes. 1997. Taxa described by Allan R. Phillips, 1939-1994: a critical list. Pages 211-234 in Dickerman, R.W. (editor). The era of Allan R. Phillips: a festchrift. Horizon Communications, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Phillips, A.R. 1991. The known birds of North and Middle America. Part II. Bombycillidae; Sylviidae to Sturnidae; Vireonidae. Privately published, Denver, Colorado.

 

page 567, Green Oriole Oriolus flavocinctus

Revjse the range statement for subspecies tiwi from “Melville and Bathhurst Islands (Northern Territory)” to “Melville and Bathurst Islands (Northern Territory)”.

 

page 700, Piopio Turnagra capensis

Correct the range description for Piopio (Turnagra capensis) from “Formerly New Zealadn/ Extinct; last reported 1963” to “Formerly New Zealand. Extinct; last reported 1963”.

 

page 579, Hair-crested Drongo Dicrurus hottentottus

Revise the range statement for subspecies brevirostris from “S China to n Myanmar, n Laos and n Vietnam” to “breeds central and southern China south to n Myanmar, n Laos and n Vietnam; most of the population migrates south, wintering in Indochina, Thailand, and Myanmar”.

 

pages 468-471, fantails Rhipidura

The sequence of species in Rhipidura (fantails) is revised, following Nyári et al. (2009).

Reference:

Nyári, A.S., B.W. Benz, K.A. Jønsson, J. Fjeldså, and R.G. Moyle. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships of fantails (Aves: Rhipiduridae). Zoologica Scripta 38: 553–561.

 

page 469, White-winged Fantail Rhipidura cockerelli

Following recent literature (e.g., Boles 2006, Dutson 2011), change the English name of Rhipidura cockerelli from “White-winged Fantail” to “Cockerell’s Fantail”.

References:

Boles, W.E. 2006. Family Rhipiduridae (Fantails). Pages 200-242 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 471, Matthias Fantail Rhipidura matthiae

Change the English name for Rhipidura matthiae from “Matthias Fantail” to “Mussau Fantail”, following Boles (2006) and Dutson (2011). Revise the range from “St. Matthias Group (n Bismarck Archipelago)” to “Mussau (St. Matthias group, northern Bismarck Archipelago)”.

References:

Boles, W.E. 2006. Family Rhipiduridae (Fantails). Pages 200-242 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 470, Rusty-flanked Fantail Rhipidura teysmanni

Revise the English name of Rhipidura teysmanni from “Rusty-flanked Fantail” to “Rusty-bellied Fantail”, following White and Bruce (1986) and Coates and Bishop (1997).

References:

Coates, B.J., and K.D. Bishop. 1997. A guide to the birds of Wallacea. Sulawesi, The Moluccas, and Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia. Dove Publications, Alderley, Queensland.

White, C.M.N., and M.D. Bruce. 1986. The Birds of Wallacea. (Sulawesi, The Moluccas & Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia). British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 7. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

 

page 470, Cinnamon-backed Fantail Rhipidura superflua

Revise the English name of Rhipidura superflua from “Cinnamon-backed Fantail” to “Tawny-backed Fantail”, following White and Bruce (1986) and Coates and Bishop (1997).

References:

Coates, B.J., and K.D. Bishop. 1997. A guide to the birds of Wallacea. Sulawesi, The Moluccas, and Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia. Dove Publications, Alderley, Queensland.

White, C.M.N., and M.D. Bruce. 1986. The Birds of Wallacea. (Sulawesi, The Moluccas & Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia). British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 7. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

 

page 470, Streaky-breasted Fantail Rhipidura dedemi

Revise the English name of Rhipidura dedemi from “Streaky-breasted Fantail” to “Streak-breasted Fantail”, following Coates and Bishop (1997).

References:

Coates, B.J., and K.D. Bishop. 1997. A guide to the birds of Wallacea. Sulawesi, The Moluccas, and Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia. Dove Publications, Alderley, Queensland.

White, C.M.N., and M.D. Bruce. 1986. The Birds of Wallacea. (Sulawesi, The Moluccas & Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia). British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 7. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

 

page 471, Rufous Fantail Rhipidura rufifrons

Revise the range of the monotypic group Rufous Fantail (Guam) (Rhipidura rufifrons uraniae) from “Guam (Mariana Islands)” to “Guam (Mariana Islands); extinct”.

 

page 470, Streaked Fantail Rhipidura spilodera

The scientific name of Streaked Fantail changes from Rhipidura spilodera to Rhipidura verreauxi (Dickinson and Watling 2006).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and D. Watling. 2006. The valid specific name of the Streaked Fantail. Bulletin of the British Ornitholgists’ Club 126:  59-60.

 

page 591, Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus

Change the English name of the polytypic group Cyanopica cyanus [cyanus Group] from “Azure-winged Magpie (Asian)” to “Azure-winged Magpie (Azure-winged)”.

 

page 591, Ceylon Blue-Magpie Urocissa ornata

In accord with recent literature (e.g. Dickinson 2003, dos Anjos 2009, Harrison 2011), we change the English name of Urocissa ornata from “Ceylon Magpie” to “Sri Lanka Blue-Magpie”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Harrison, J.2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 591, Formosan Blue-Magpie Urocissa caerulea

In accord with recent literature (e.g. Madge and Burn 1994, MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Brazil 2009, dos Anjos 2009), we change the English name of Urocissa caerulea from “Formosan Magpie” to “Taiwan Blue-Magpie”.

References:

Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Madge, S., and H. Burn. 1994. Crows and jays. A guide to the crows, jays and magpies of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 591, Gold-billed Magpie Urocissa flavirostris

In accord with recent literature (e.g. MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Robson 2000, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, dos Anjos 2009), we change the English name of Urocissa flavirostris from “Gold-billed Magpie” to “Yellow-billed Blue-Magpie”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 591, Blue Magpie Urocissa erythrorhyncha

In accord with recent literature (e.g. MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Robson 2000, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Brazil 2009, dos Anjos 2009), we change the English name of Urocissa erythrorhyncha from “Blue Magpie” to “Red-billed Blue-Magpie”.

References:

Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 591, Green Magpie Cissa chinensis

In accord with recent literature (e.g. MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Robson 2000, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, dos Anjos 2009), we change the English name of Cissa chinensis from “Green Magpie” to “Common Green-Magpie”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 591, Yellow-breasted Magpie Cissa hypoleuca

In accord with recent literature (e.g. MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Robson 2000, dos Anjos 2009), we change the English name of Cissa hypoleuca from “Yellow-breasted Magpie” to “Indochinese Green-Magpie”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

dos Anjos, L. 2009. Family Corvidae (crows). Pages 494-640 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 14. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 592, Andaman Treepie Dendrocitta bayleyi

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Andaman Treepie from Dendrocitta bayleyi to Dendrocitta bayleii (David et al. 2009).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

pages 583-585, Birds-of-paradise Paradisaeidae

In accord with most recent literature (e.g., Forshaw and Cooper 1977, Beehler et al. 1986, Laman and Scholes 2012), we change the group name for species in this family from “Bird-of-paradise” to “Bird-of-Paradise”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., T.K. Pratt, and D.A. Zimmerman. 1986. Birds of New Guinea. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Forshaw, J.M., and W.T. Cooper. 1977. The birds of paradise and bower birds. Collins, Sydney, Australia.

Laman, T., and E. Scholes. 2012. Birds of paradise: revealing the world’s most extraordinary birds. National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.

 

page 584, Black Sicklebill Epimachus fastuosus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Black Sicklebill from Epimachus fastuosus to Epimachus fastosus, following David et al. (2009).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

page 350, Sidamo Lark Heteromirafra sidamoensis

Revise the range for Sidamo Lark from “Known from two specimens from s Ethiopia” to “southern Ethiopia (Liben Plain, near Negele)”.

 

page 354, Horned Lark Eremophila alpestris

In accord with nomenclatural priority, change the scientific name for the polytypic group Horned Lark (Western pale Group) from Eremophila alpestris [leucolaema Group] to Eremophila alpestris [occidentalis Group].

 

page 525, Coal Tit Periparus ater

Subspecies Periparus ater gaddi and Periparus ater chorassanicus of Coal Tit are deleted, as synonyms of Periparus ater phaeonotus, following Kirwan and Grieve (2010). Revise the range of subspecies phaeonotus from “Zagros Mountains (sw Iran)” to “southeastern Azerbaijan, northern Iran, and southwestern Turkmenistan; status in southwestern Iran (Zagros Mountains) unclear, perhaps only a rare nonbreeding visitor”.

Reference:

Kirwan, G.M., and A. Grieve. 2010. How many subspecies of Coal Tit Periparus ater are there in Iran? Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 83-87.

 

page 525, Yellow-bellied Tit Pardaliparus venustulus

page 525, Elegant Tit Pardaliparus elegans

page 526, Palawan Tit Pardaliparus amabilis

The genus Pardaliparus is merged with Periparus, following Gill et al. (2005). The scientific name for Yellow-bellied Tit changes from Pardaliparus venustulus to Periparus venustulus; the scientific name for Elegant Tit changes from Pardaliparus elegans to Periparus elegans; and the scientific name for Palawan Tit changes from Pardaliparus amabilis to Periparus amabilis.

Reference:

Gill, F.B., B. Slikas, and F.H. Sheldon. 2005. Phylogeny of titmice (Paridae): II. Species relationships based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome-B gene. Auk 122: 121-143.

 

page 527,  Indian Tit Parus aplonotus

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name tranvancoreensis to travancoreensis.

 

page 528, Yellow Tit Macholophus holsti

The monotypic genus Macholophus no longer is recognized and is merged with Parus, following Gill et al. (2005); the scientific name for Yellow Tit changes from Macholophus holsti to Parus holsti.

Reference:

Gill, F.B., B. Slikas, and F.H. Sheldon. 2005. Phylogeny of titmice (Paridae): II. Species relationships based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome-B gene. Auk 122: 121-143.

 

page 528, White-fronted Tit Sittiparus semilarvatus

The genus Sittiparus no longer is recognized, following Gill et al. (2005), and the scientific name of White-fronted Tit changes from Sittiparus semilarvatus to Parus semilarvatus.

Reference:

Gill, F.B., B. Slikas, and F.H. Sheldon. 2005. Phylogeny of titmice (Paridae): II. Species relationships based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome-B gene. Auk 122: 121-143.

 

page 528, African Blue Tit Cyanistes teneriffae

Revise the range of subspecies Cyanistes teneriffae teneriffae from “Canary Islands (Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria)” to “Canary Islands (Gomera and Tenerife)”.

Insert the recently described subspecies Cyanistes teneriffae hedwigae, with range “Canary Islands (Gran Canaria)”, immediately following Cyanistes teneriffae teneriffae (Dietzen et al. 2008, Manegold 2012).

References:

Dietzen, C., E. Garcia-del-Rey, G.D. Castro, and M. Wink. 2008. Phylogeography of the blue tit (Parus teneriffae-group) on the Canary Islands based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data and morphometrics. Journal of Ornithology 149: 1-12.

Manegold, A. 2012. On the name of the Canary Blue Tit Cyanistes teneriffae from Gran Canaria. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 68.

 

page 530, White-breasted Nuthatch Sitta carolinensis

Genetic data (Spellman and Klicka 2007) shows that subspecies lagunae belongs with the polytypic group White-breasted Nuthatch (Interior West) Sitta carolinensis [mexicana Group], and not with White-breasted Nuthatch (Pacific) Sitta carolinensis [aculeata Group].

Reference:

Spellman, G.M., and J. Klicka. 2007. Phylogeography of the white-breasted nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis): diversification in North American pine and oak woodlands. Molecular Ecology 16: 1729–1740.

 

page 394, Pacific Wren Troglodytes pacificus

Revise the range of subspecies semidiensis from “Semidi Islands (southern Alaska)” to “Semidi Islands (Gulf of Alaska)”.

 

page 395, Sedge Wren Cistothorus platensis

aequatorialis: Subspecies Cistothorus platensis tamae and Cistothorus platensis tolimae (are deleted, as synonyms of Cistothorus platensis aequatorialis, following Traylor (1988). Revise the range of aequatorialis from “Central and Western Andes of s Colombia and Ecuador” to “Central and Western Andes of Colombia, south to central Ecuador”.

Revise the range of Cistothorus platensis graminicola from “Andes of s Peru (Junín to Cusco) to nw Bolivia” to “Andes from southern Ecuador south through Peru to northwestern Bolivia (La Paz)”.

Revise the range of Cistothorus platensis minimus from “Andes of s Peru (Puno) and adjacent Bolivia” to “southern Peru in Puno (Oconeque)”.

Reference:

Traylor, M.A., Jr. 1988. Geographic variation and evolution in South American Cistothorus platensis (Aves: Troglodytidae). Fieldiana: Zoology (new series) number 48.

 

page 395, Marsh Wren Cistothorus palustris

Change the English name of the polytpic group Cistothorus palustris [paludicola Group] from “Marsh Wren (Coastal Pacific)” to “Marsh Wren (Pacific)”.

Subspecies Cistothorus palustris aestuarinus is transferred from the polytypic group Marsh Wren (Interior West) (Cistothorus palustris [plesius Group]) to the polytypic group Marsh Wren (Pacific) (Cistothorus palustris [paludicola Group]). Subspecies Cistothorus palustris deserticola is synonymized with aestuarinus (Unitt et al. 1996, Kroodsma and Verner 1997). Revise the range of aestuarinus from “Inland valleys of s California, s Nevada and sw Arizona” to “Coastal central Oregon to southern California (Ventura County), the Central Valley and desert marshes of southern California, southern Nevada and southwestern Arizona”.

Revise the range of subspecies Cistothorus palustris clarkae from “Coastal s California (Los Angeles Co. to San Diego County)” to “coastal southern California (Los Angeles County to San Diego County, inland to western Riverside County)”.

Revise the range of subspecies Cistothorus palustris pulverius from “Cent. Br. Columbia and Idaho to ne California and nw Nevada” to “central British Columbia and Idaho to northeastern and eastern California (east of the Sierra Nevada to northern Inyo County) and adjacent western Nevada”.

Subspecies Cistothorus palustris iliacus is transferred from the group Marsh Wren (Interior West) (Cistothorus palustris [plesius Group]) to the group Marsh Wren (Eastern) (Cistothorus palustris [palustris Group]). Revise the range of iliacus from “W-central Canada to w-central US; winters to Gulf Coast” to “south central Canada to central US; winters to Gulf Coast”.

Revise the range of subspecies Cistothorus palustris dissaeptus from “S-central Canada to n-central US; winters to ne Mexico” to “south central Canada to north central and northeastern US; winters to northeastern Mexico”.

References:

Kroodsma, D.E., and J. Verner. 1997. Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris). A. Poole (editor), Birds of North America Online. Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca.

Unitt, P., K. Messer, and M. Théry. 1996. Taxonomy of the Marsh Wren in southern California. Proceedings of the San Diego Society of Natural History 31: 1-20.

 

page 445, California Gnatcatcher Polioptila californica

Insert nominate Polioptila californica californica immediately following the heading for California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica), with range “southwestern California to south to northwestern Baja California”.

 

page 445, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher Polioptila melanura

Subspecies Polioptila melanura pontilis properly belongs with California Gnatcatcher, and so becomes Polioptila californica pontilis.

Subspecies Polioptila melanura margaritae properly belongs with California Gnatcatcher, and so becomes Polioptila californica margaritae.

 

page 446, Guianan Gnatcatcher Polioptila guianensis

Revise the range of the monotypic group Guianan Gnatcatcher (Guianan) Polioptila guianensis guianensis from “Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana” to “The Guianas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) south to the Amazon”.

Revise the range of the monotypic group Guianan Gnatcatcher (Para) Polioptila guianensis paraensis from “E Brazil (Manaus area and from lower Rio Tapajós to Belém)” to “eastern Amazonian Brazil south of the Amazon, and east of the Rio Madeira”.

 

page 378, Cameroon Mountain Greenbul Arizelocichla montanus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Cameroon Mountain Greenbul from Arizelocichla montanus to Arizelocichla montana.

 

page 379, Western Mountain-Greenbul Arizelocichla tephrolaemus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Western Mountain-Greenbul from Arizelocichla tephrolaemus to Arizelocichla tephrolaema. The scientific name of the nominate subspecies also changes from tephrolaemus to tephrolaema.

 

Pages 376-377, Common Bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus

Subspecies Pycnonotus barbatus spurius and Pycnonotus barbatus layardi are transferred from the polytypic group Common Bulbul (Common) (Pycnonotus barbatus [barbatus Group]) to the group Common Bulbul (Dark-capped); the scientific name for this group changes from Pycnonotus barbatus tricolor to Pycnonotus barbatus [tricolor Group].

 

page 434, Grauer’s Warbler Graueria vittata

Grauer’s Warbler traditionally was included in Sylviidae (Sylvids) (e.g. Watson et al. 1986), but apparently it is not a member of that family. In the absence of a clear indication of where Grauer’s Warbler belongs, and because it sometimes is thought to be “close to” Macrosphenus, we provisionally move Grauer’s Warbler to a position of “limbo” (incertae sedis) at the end of Macrosphenidae (African Warblers), immediately following Kretschmer’s Longbill (Macrosphenus kretschmeri).

Reference:

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 436, Green Hylia Hylia prasina

Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) traditionally was included in Sylviidae (Sylvids) (e.g. Watson et al. 1986). The affinities of Green Hylia are not with Sylviidae, but this species apparently is related to the enigmatic Tit-hylia (Pholidornis rushiae) (Sefc et al. 2003), which often has been classified in Estrildidae (Waxbills and Allies) (e.g. Mayr et al. 1968). In the absence of a clear indication of where these two species belong, we provisionally move them to a position of “limbo” (incertae sedis) at the end of Macrosphenidae (African Warblers), immediately following Grauer’s Warbler (Graueria vittata).

References:

Mayr, E., R.A. Paynter, Jr., and M.A. Traylor. 1968. Family Estrildidae, waxbills, grass finches, and mannikins. Pages 306-390 in R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editor), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XIV. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetss.

Sefc, K.M., R.B. Payne, and M.D. Sorenson. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships of African sunbird-like warblers: Moho (Hypergerus atriceps), Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) and Tit-hylia (Pholidornis rushiae). Ostrich 74:  8–17.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 534, Tit-hylia Pholidornis rushiae

The enigmatic Tit-hylia (Pholidornis rushiae) often has been classified in Estrildidae (Waxbills and Allies) (e.g. Mayr et al. 1968). The affinities of Tit-hylia are not with Estrildidae, but theis two species apparently is related to Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) (Sefc et al. 2003), which often has been classified in Sylviidae (Sylvids) (e.g. Watson et al. 1986). In the absence of a clear indication of where these two species belong, we provisionally move them to a position of “limbo” (incertae sedis) at the end of Macrosphenidae (African Warblers), immediately following Grauer’s Warbler (Graueria vittata).

References:

Mayr, E., R.A. Paynter, Jr., and M.A. Traylor. 1968. Family Estrildidae, waxbills, grass finches, and mannikins. Pages 306-390 in R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editor), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XIV. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetss.

Sefc, K.M., R.B. Payne, and M.D. Sorenson. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships of African sunbird-like warblers: Moho (Hypergerus atriceps), Green Hylia (Hylia prasina) and Tit-hylia (Pholidornis rushiae). Ostrich 74:  8–17.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

pages 419, 425-426, 432-433, 435, 440-441, 471-472, Bush-Warblers and Allies Cettiidae

The sequence of genera in Cettiidae (Bush-Warblers and Allies), and the sequence of species in most of the genera of Bush-Warblers and Allies, is revised. The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Erythrocercus

Scotocerca

Urosphena

Tesia

Cettia

Abroscopus

Phyllergates

Tickellia

Horornis

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 435, Neumann’s Warbler Hemitesia neumanni

Neumann’s Warbler (Hemitesia neumanni) is transferred to the genus Urosphena, following Alström et al. (2011b); the scientific name of Neumann’s Warbler changes to Urosphena neumanni.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

page 425, Pale-footed Bush-Warbler Cettia pallidipes

Pale-footed Bush-Warbler (Cettia pallidipes) is transferred to the genus Urosphena, following Alström et al. (2011b); the scientific name of Pale-footed Bush-Warbler changes to Urosphena pallidipes.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 425, Chestnut-headed Tesia Tesia castaneocoronata

Chestnut-headed Tesia (Tesia castaneocoronata) is transferred to the genus Cettia, following Alström et al. (2011b); the scientific name of Chestnut-headed Tesia changes to Cettia castaneocoronata.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 425, Philippine Bush-Warbler Cettia seebohmi

Philippine Bush-Warbler (Cettia seebohmi) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Philippine Bush-Warbler changes to Horornnis seebohmi.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 425, Japanese Bush-Warbler Cettia diphone

Japanese Bush-Warbler (Cettia diphone) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Japanese Bush-Warbler changes to Horornnis diphone.

With the transfer of Japanese Bush-Warbler from Cettia to Horornis, the scientific name of subspecies restricta changes to restrictus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 425, Manchurian Bush-Warbler Cettia canturians

Manchurian Bush-Warbler (Cettia canturians) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Manchurian Bush-Warbler changes to Horornnis canturians.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Palau Bush-Warbler Cettia annae

Palau Bush-Warbler (Cettia annae) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Palau Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis annae.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Tanimbar Bush-Warbler Cettia carolinae

Tanimbar Bush-Warbler (Cettia carolinae) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Tanimbar Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis carolinae.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Shade Warbler Cettia parens

Shade Warbler (Cettia parens) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Shade Warbler changes to Horornis parens.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Odedi Cettia haddeni

Odedi (Cettia haddeni) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Odedi changes to Horornis haddeni.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Fiji Bush-Warbler Cettia ruficapilla

Fiji Bush-Warbler (Cettia ruficapilla) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Fiji Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis ruficapilla.

With the transfer of Fiji Bush-Warbler from Cettia to Horornis, the scientific name of subspecies castaneoptera changes to castaneopterus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler Cettia fortipes

Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler (Cettia fortipes) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis fortipes.

With the transfer of Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler from Cettia to Horornis, the scientific name of subspecies pallida changes to pallidus, and the scientific name of subspecies davidiana changes to davidianus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler Cettia acanthizoides

Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler (Cettia acanthizoides) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis acanthizoides.

Revise the range of Horornis acanthizoides acanthizoides (Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler) from “Himalayas of n India to s Tibet, s China and e Myanmar” to “disjunctly in two regions of China: central China (Shannxi south to Yunnan), and in east central China (Anhui to Fujian)”.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Sunda Bush-Warbler Cettia vulcania

Sunda Bush-Warbler (Cettia vulcania) is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Sunda Bush-Warbler changes to Horornis vulcanius

With the transfer of Sunda Bush-Warbler from Cettia to Horornis, the scientific name of subspecies sepiaria changes to sepiarius; the scientific name of subspecies vulcania changes to vulcanius; the scientific name of subspecies oreophila changes to oreophilus; and the scientific name of subspecies palawana changes to palawanus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

page 426, Aberrant Bush-Warbler Cettia flavolivacea

Aberrant Bush-Warbler (Cettia flavolivacea is transferred to the genus Horornis, following Alström et al. (2011b). The scientific name of Aberrant Bush-Warbler changes to Horornnis flavolivaceus.

With the transfer of Aberrant Bush-Warbler from Cettia to Horornis, the scientific name of subspecies flavolivacea changes to flavolivaceus; the scientific name of subspecies intricata changes to intricatus; and the scientific name of subspecies oblita changes to oblitus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Höhna, M. Gelang, P.G.P. Ericson, and U. Olsson. 2011b. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 352.

 

pages 429-432, Reed-Warblers and Allies Acrocephalus

The sequence of species within Acrocephalus (Reed-Warblers and Allies, Acrocephalidae) is revised following Fregin et al. (2009) and Cibois et al. (2011).

References:

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, , E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeographhy 38: 1963–1975.

Fregin, S., M. Hasse, U. Olsson, and P. Alström. 2009. Multi-locus phylogeny of the family Acrocephalidae (Aves: Passeriformes) — the traditional taxonomy overthrown. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 52: 866–878.

 

page 432, Rodrigues Brush-Warbler Acrocephalus rodericanus

Revise the English name for Acrocephalus rodericanus from “Rodrigues Brush-Warbler” to “Rodrigues Warbler”.

 

page 432, Seychelles Brush-Warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis

Revise the English name for Acrocephalus sechellensis from “Seychelles Brush-Warbler” to “Seychelles Warbler”. Revise the range of this species from “Cousin (Seychelles Islands)” to “Seychelles Islands (Cousin, Cousine, Aride)”.

 

page 430,  Clamorous Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus stentoreus

The polytypic group Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Clamorous) (Acrocephalus stentoreus [stentoreus Group]) includes only the subspecies stentoreus and levantinus, and so the scientific name for this group changes to “Acrocephalus stentoreus stentoreus/levantinus“.

Revise the range of Acrocephalus stentoreus stentoreus from “Egypt to Sinai Peninsula, Levant and Jordan” to “Egypt “.

Add a new subspecies of Clamorous Reed-Warbler, Acrocephalus stentoreus levantinus Roselaar 1994, with range “northern Israel”. Insert subspecies levantinus immediately following subspecies Acrocephalus stentoreus stentoreus.

The group Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Indian) (Acrocephalus stentoreus brunnescens) should be a polytypic group, including most subspecies of Clamorous Reed-Warbler (brunnescens, amyae, meridionalis, harterti, celebensis, siebersii, lentecaptus, and sumbae). The scientific name from this group changes from Acrocephalus stentoreus brunnescens to Acrocephalus stentoreus [brunnescens Group], and the English name for the group changes from “Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Indian)” to “Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Brown)”.

Reference:

Roselaar, C.S. 1994. Geographical variation within western populations of Clamorous Reed Warbler. Dutch Birding 16: 237-239.

 

page 430, Nightingale Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus luscinius

Revise the range of from “Mariana Islands (Guam, Agrihan, Alamagan and Saipan)” to “Guam (Mariana Islands); extinct”.

 

page 431, Christmas Island Warbler Acrocephalus aequinoctialis

Revise the English name for Acrocephalus aequinoctialis from “Christmas Island Warbler” to “Kiritimati Reed-Warbler”.

 

pages 426-429, 441-442, 700 Grassbirds and Allies Locustellidae

The family Locustellidae (Grassbirds and Allies) is revised, following Alström et al. (2011a); many species are shuffled into new genera, and the sequence of species is revised. The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Megalurus

Schoenicola

Bradypterus

Locustella

Elaphrornis

Amphilais

Buettikoferella

Megalurulus

Trichocichla

Chaetornis

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 442, Spinifex-bird Eremiornis carteri

The monotypic genus Eremiornis is merged with the genus Megalurus, following Alström et al. (2011a). As a result, the scientific name for Spinifex-bird (Eremiornis carteri) changes to Megalurus carteri.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 442, Brown Songlark Cincloramphus cruralis

page 442, Rufous Songlark Cincloramphus mathewsi

The genus Cincloramphus is merged with Megalurus, following Alström et al. (2011a). The scientific name of Brown Songlark (Cincloramphus cruralis) changes to Megalurus cruralis, and the scientific name of Rufous Songlark (Cincloramphus mathewsi) changes to Megalurus mathewsi.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Brown Emu-tail Dromaeocercus brunneus

Brown Emu-tail (Dromaeocercus brunneus) is transfered to Bradypterus, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Bradypterus brunneus.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 441, Marsh Grassbird Megalurus pryeri

Marsh Grassbird (Megalurus pryeri) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella pryeri.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Brown Bush-Warbler Bradypterus luteoventris

Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus luteoventris) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella luteoventris.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Chinese Bush-Warbler Bradypterus tacsanowskius

Chinese Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus tacsanowskius) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella tacsanowskia.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly

in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 427, Long-billed Bush-Warbler Bradypterus major

Long-billed Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus major) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella major.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Long-tailed Bush-Warbler Bradypterus caudatus

Long-tailed Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus caudatus) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella caudata.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Chestnut-backed Bush-Warbler Bradypterus castaneus

Chestnut-backed Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus castaneus) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella castanea.

The scientific name of subspecies castaneus changes to castanea, and the scientific name of subspecies musculus changes to muscula.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Taiwan Bush-Warbler Bradypterus alishanensis

Taiwan Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus alishanensis) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella alishanensis.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Friendly Bush-Warbler Bradypterus accentor

Friendly Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus accentor) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella accentor.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Russet Bush-Warbler Bradypterus mandelli

Russet Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus mandelli) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al.

(2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella mandelli.

The scientific name of subspecies melanorhynchus changes to melanorhyncha, and the scientific name of subspecies idoneus changes to idonea.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Benguet Bush-Warbler Bradypterus seebohmi

Benguet Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus seebohmi) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella seebohmi.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Javan Bush-Warbler Bradypterus montis

Javan Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus montis) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella montis.

Reference:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

 

page 428, Timor Bush-Warbler Bradypterus timoriensis

Timor Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus timorensis, previously spelled, erroneously, as “timoriensis“) is transfered to Locustella, following Alström et al. (2011a), and the scientific name changes to Locustella timorensis. Revise the range statement from “Mountains of Timor (e Lesser Sundas)” to “Mountains of Timor and Alor (e Lesser Sundas)”, following Trainor et al. (2012).

References:

Alström, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513–526.

Trainor, C.R., P. Verbelen, and S. Hoste. 2012. Rediscovery of the Timor Bush Warber Locustella timorensis on Alor and Timor, Wallacea: clarifying taxonomic affinities, defining habitat and survey recommendations. Bird Conservation International 22: 354-369.

 

page 428, Ceylon Bush-Warbler Bradypterus palliseri

Ceylon Bush-Warbler (Bradypterus palliseri) is transfered to Elaphrornis, following Rasmuseen and Anderton (2005) and Kennerly and Pearson (2010), and the scientific name changes to Elaphrornis  palliseri. In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Dickinson 2003. Harrison 2011), change the English name from “Ceylon Bush-Warbler” to “Sri Lanka Bush-Warbler”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Kennerly, P., and D. Pearson. 2010. Reed and bush warblers. Christopher Helm, London.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 428, Gray Emu-tail Dromaeocercus seebohmi

Gray Emu-tail (Dromaeocercus seebohmi) is transferred to the genus Amphilais (Parker 1984), and the scientific name changes to Amphilais seebohmi.

Reference:

Parker, S.A. 1984. The relationships of the Madagascan genus Dromaocercus (Syllviidae). Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 104: 11-18.

 

page 428, Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler Bathmocercus winifredae

Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler (Bathmocercus winifredae), is not congeneric with other Bathmocercus warblers, and so is placed in the monotypic genus Scepomycter (Nguembock et al. 2007). The phylogenetic affinities of Scepomycter are not completely resolved, but provisionally we reposition Scepomycter immediately following Cricket Longtail (Spiloptila clamans).

Bowie et al. (2009) described a new warbler, very similar to Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler (Scepomycter winifredae), from the Eastern Arc mountains of Tanzania. They proposed recognition of this warbler as a species, Rubeho Warbler (Scepomycter rubehoensis), with range “montane forests of eastern Tanzania (Ukaguru and Rubeho Mountains)”. Provisionally we add this taxon to the eBird/Clements list as a subspecies of Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler, but we also recognize it as a new monotypic group, Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler (Rubeho) Scepomycter winifredae rubehoensis.

Reference:

Bowie, R.C.K., J. Fjeldså, and J. Kiure. 2009. Multilocus molecular DNA variation in

Winifred’s Warbler Scepomycter winifredae suggests cryptic speciation and the existence of a threatened species in the Rubeho-Ukaguru Mountains of Tanzania. Ibis 151: 709-719.

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Tillier, and E. Pasquet. 2007. A phylogeny for the Cisticolidae (Aves: Passeriformes) based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data, and a re-interpretation of a unique nest-building specialization. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 272-286.

 

page 415, Red-pate Cisticola Cisticola ruficeps

page 415, Dorsts’s Cisticola Cisticola dorsti

Chappuis and Erard (1991) described as a new species, Dorsts’s Cisticola (Cisticola dorsti), a distinctive cisticola from west Africa. More recently, Dowsett-Lemaire et al. (2005) documented that Cisticola dorsti is the same taxon as what then was considered to be a subspecies of Red-pate Cisticola, Cisticola ruficeps guinea, which had been described in 1930. Consequently, guinea is deleted as a subspecies of Red-pate Cisticola, and the scientific name of Dorst’s Cisticola becomes Cisticola guinea. Also, the range of Dorst’s Cisticola is revised from “Grassy steppes of nw Nigeria, n Cameroon and s Chad” to “west Africa from The Gambia east to Chad”.

References:

Chappuis, C., and C. Erard. 1991. A new cisticola from west-central Africa. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 111: 59-70.

Dowsett-Lemaire, F., N. Borrow, and R.J. Dowsett. 2005. Cisticola dorsti (Dorst’s Cisticola) and C. ruficeps guinea are conspecific. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 125: 305-313.

 

page 433, tailorbirds Orthotomus

The sequence of species of tailorbirds (Orthotomus) is revised, following Sheldon et al. (2012).

Reference:

Sheldon, F.H., C.H. Oliveros, S.S. Taylor, B. McKay, H.C. Lim, M.A. Rahman,, H. Mays, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. Molecular phylogeny and insular biogeography of the lowland tailorbirds of Southeast Asia (Cisticolidae: Orthotomus). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 54–63.

 

page 433, Philippine Tailorbird Orthotomus castaneiceps

Revise the range of subspecies Orthotomus castaneiceps castaneiceps (Philippine Tailorbird) from “Philippines (Masbate, Panay, Guimaras, Bantayan and Ticao)” to “Philippines (Panay, Masbate, Guimaras, Bantayan, Calagna-an, and Ticao)”.

Revise the range of subspecies Orthotomus castaneiceps rabori (Philippine Tailorbird) from “Negros (Philippines)” to “Philippines (Negros and Cebu)”.

 

pages 443-445, 496, 509 sylvid warblers genus Sylvia

The sequence of species in the genus Sylvia is revised, following Voelker and Light (2011).

Reference:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

 

Page 496, African Hill Babbler Pseudoalcippe abyssinica

The monotypic genus Pseudoalcippe is merged into the genus Sylvia, following Voelker et al. (2009) and Voelker and Light (2011). As a result, the scientific name for African Hill Babbler is changed from Pseudoalcippe abyssinica to Sylvia abyssinica. African Hill Babbler is positioned at the beginning of the genus Sylvia, immediately following Abyssinian Catbird (Parophasma galinieri).

References:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

Voelker, G., M. Melo, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2009. A Gulf of Guinea island endemic is a member of a Mediterranean-centered bird genus. Ibis 151:580-583.

 

page 509, Bush Blackcap Lioptilus nigricapillus

The monotypic genus Lioptilus is merged into the genus Sylvia, following Voelker et al. (2009) and Voelker and Light (2011). As a result, the scientific name for Bush Blackcap changes from Lioptilus nigricapillus to Sylvia nigricapilla. Bush Blackcap is moved to a new position near the beginning of Sylvia, immediately following African Hill Babbler (Sylvia abyssinica).

References:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

Voelker, G., M. Melo, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2009. A Gulf of Guinea island endemic is a member of a Mediterranean-centered bird genus. Ibis 151:580-583.

 

page 509, Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler Horizorhinus dohrni

The monotypic genus Horizorhinus is merged into the genus Sylvia, following Voelker et al. (2009) and Voelker and Light (2011). As a result, the scientific name for Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler changes from Horizorhinus dohrni to Sylvia dohrni. Dohrn’s Thrush-Babbler is moved to a new position near the beginning of Sylvia, immediately following Bush Blackcap (Sylvia nigricapilla).

References:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

Voelker, G., M. Melo, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2009. A Gulf of Guinea island endemic is a member of a Mediterranean-centered bird genus. Ibis 151:580-583.

 

page 444, Layard’s Warbler Parisoma layardi

The genus Parisoma is merged with the genus Sylvia, following Voelker and Light (2011). The scientific name for Layard’s Warbler changes from Parisoma layardi to Sylvia layardi. Layard’s Warbler is moved to a new position immediately following Barred Warbler (Sylvia nisoria).

With the transfer of Layard’s Warbler from Parisoma to Sylvia, the scientific name for subspecies subsolanum changes to subsolana.

Reference:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

 

page 444, Banded Warbler Parisoma boehmi

The genus Parisoma is merged with the genus Sylvia, following Voelker and Light (2011). The scientific name for Banded Warbler changes from Parisoma boehmi to Sylvia boehmi. Banded Warbler is moved to a new position immediately following Layard’s Warbler (Sylvia layardi).

With the transfer of Banded Warbler from Parisoma to Sylvia, the scientific name for subspecies somalicum changes to somalica.

Reference:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

 

page 444, Rufous-vented Warbler Parisoma subcaerulea

The genus Parisoma is merged with the genus Sylvia, following Voelker and Light (2011). The scientific name for Rufous-vented Warbler changes from Parisoma subcaeruleum to Sylvia subcaerulea. Rufous-vented Warbler is moved to a new position immediately following Banded Warbler (Sylvia boehmi).

With the transfer of Rufous-vented Warbler from Parisoma to Sylvia, the scientific name for subspecies orpheanum changes to orpheana.

Reference:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

 

page 443, Small Whitethroat Sylvia minula

Change the English name for Sylvia minula from “Small White-throat” to “Desert Whitethroat”. Revise the range of Desert Whitethroat from “Deserts of western China” to “breeds from Turkenistan and Uzbekistan (and probably Iran) east through northern Afghanistan and Tajikistan to western China; winters to the south”.

 

page 443, Margelanic Whitethroat Sylvia margelanica

Revise the range of Margelanic Whitethroat (Sylvia margelanica) from “Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan to w China (Tien Shan Mountains)” to “north central China”.

 

page 444, Brown Warbler Parisoma lugens

The genus Parisoma is merged with the genus Sylvia, following Voelker and Light (2011). The scientific name for Brown Warbler (Parisoma lugens) changes to Sylvia lugens. Brown Warbler is moved to a new position immediately following Yemen Warbler (Sylvia buryi).

With the transfer of Brown Warbler from Parisoma to Sylvia, the scientific name for subspecies griseiventre changes to griseiventris, and the scientific name for subspecies clarum changes to clara.

Reference:

Voelker, G., and J.E Light. 2011. Palaeoclimatic events, dispersal and migratory losses along the Afro-European axis as drivers of biogeographic distribution in Sylvia warblers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 11: 163.

 

Page 443, Western Orphean Warbler Sylvia hortensis

Svensson (2012) described a new subspecies of Western Orphean Warbler, Sylvia hortensis cyrenaicae, with range “northeastern Libya (Cyrenaica)”. Consequently Western Orphean Warbler no longer is monotypic. Insert Sylvia hortensis hortensis immediately following the species heading Sylvia hortensis, and revise the range from “SW Europe and North Africa; winters s Mauritania to w Sudan” to “southwestern Europe and northern Africa (Morocco east to northwestern Libya); winters s Mauritania to w Sudan”. The entry of Sylvia hortensis cyrenaicae is positioned immediately following the entry for Sylvia hortensis hortensis.

Reference:

Svensson, L. 2012. A new subspecies of Western Orphean Warbler Sylvia hortensis and criteria for separating Western from Eastern Orphean Warbler S. crassirostris. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 75-83.

 

page 511, Brown Parrotbill Paradoxornis unicolor

The scientific name for Brown Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis unicolor to Cholornis unicolor, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009) and Penhallurick (2010).

References:

Penhallurick, J. 2010. A correction to Penhallurick & Robson (2009). Forktail 26: 147–148.

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 511, Three-toed Parrotbill Paradoxornis paradoxus

The scientific name for Three-toed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis paradoxus to Cholornis paradoxa, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009) and Penhallurick (2010). References:

Penhallurick, J. 2010. A correction to Penhallurick & Robson (2009). Forktail 26: 147–148.

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 511, Gray-headed Parrotbill Paradoxornis gularis

The scientific name for Gray-headed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis gularis to Psittiparus gularis, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 511, Black-headed Parrotbill Paradoxornis margaritae

The scientific name for Black-headed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis margaritae to Psittiparus margaritae, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Black-browed Parrotbill Paradoxornis atrosuperciliaris

Change the English name of Paradoxornis atrosuperciliaris from “Black-browed Parrotbill” to “Pale-billed Parrotbill”, following King and Robson (2008). The scientific name for Pale-billed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis atrosuperciliaris to Chleuasicus atrosuperciliaris, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

References:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Spectacled Parrotbill Paradoxornis conspicillatus

The scientific name for Spectacled Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis conspicillatus to Sinosuthora conspicillata, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Vinous-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis webbianus

The scientific name for Vinous-throated Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis webbianus to Sinosuthora webbiana, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

With the transfer of this species from Paradoxornis to Sinosuthora, the scientific name for subspecies suffusus changes to suffusa; the scientific name for subspecies mantschuricus changes to mantschurica; and the scientific name for subspecies bulomachus changes to bulomacha.

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Brown-winged Parrotbill Paradoxornis brunneus

The scientific name for Brown-winged Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis brunneus to Sinosuthora brunnea, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Ashy-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis alphonsianus

The scientific name for Ashy-throated Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis alphonsianus to Sinosuthora alphonsiana, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Gray-hooded Parrotbill Paradoxornis zappeyi

The scientific name for Gray-hooded Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis zappeyi to Sinosuthora zappeyi, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Rusty-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis przewalskii

The scientific name for Rusty-throated Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis przewalskii to Sinosuthora przewalskii, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Fulvous Parrotbill Paradoxornis fulvifrons

The scientific name for Fulvous Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis fulvifrons to Suthora fulvifrons, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Black-throated Parrotbill Paradoxornis nipalensis

The scientific name for Black-throated Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis nipalensis to Suthora nipalensis, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

A long standing typo is corrected: Suthora nipalensis partriciae is correceted to Suthora nipalensis patriciae.

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Golden Parrotbill Paradoxornis verreauxi

The scientific name for Golden Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis verreauxi to Suthora verreauxi, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

With the transfer of this species from Paradoxornis to Suthora, the scientific name for subspecies pallidus changes to pallida; and the scientific name for subspecies morrisonianus changes to morrisoniana.

Subspecies Suthora verreauxi beaulieu belongs with Black-throated Parrotbill (Suthora nipalensis) and becomes Suthora nipalensis beaulieu. Position this subspecies following Suthora nipalensis ripponi.

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 512, Short-tailed Parrotbill Paradoxornis davidianus

The scientific name for Short-tailed Parrotbill changes from Paradoxornis davidianus to Neosuthora davidiana, following Penhallurick and Robson (2009).

Reference:

Penhallurick, J., and C. Robson. 2009. The generic taxonomy of parrotbills (Aves, Timaliidae). Forktail 25: 137–141.

 

page 551, Ceylon White-eye Zosterops ceylonensis

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Dickinson 2003. Harrison 2011), change the English name for Zosterops ceylonensis from “Ceylon White-eye” to “Sri Lanka White-eye”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

pages 488, 496-497, 499-503 babblers Timaliidae

The English name for the family Timaliidae is changed from “Babblers” to “Tree-Babblers, Scimitar-Babblers, and Allies”. The sequence of the genera and species in Timaliidae is revised, following Moyle et al. (2012). We retain the babblers (sensu lato) in three families (Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae) but note that some authorities would merge all three of these into a single family, Timaliidae (e.g. Gelang et al. 2009, Moyle et al. 2012). The sequence of the babbler families is changed from Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae to Timaliidae, Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae. The sequence of genera that we adopt in Timaliidae is:

Timalia

Mixornis

Dumetia

Rhopocichla

Macronus

Cyanoderma

Spelaeornis

Sphenocichla

Pomatorhinus

Megapomatorhinus

Stachyris

Micromacronus

Malia

References:

Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Pin-striped Tit-Babbler Macronous gularis

Pin-striped Tit-Babbler is transferred from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Macronous gularis to Mixornis gularis.

With the transfer of Pin-striped Tit-Babbler from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies sulphureus changes to sulphurea; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies inveteratus changes to inveterata; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies archipelagicus changes to archipelagica; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies chersonesophilus changes to chersonesophila.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Bold-striped Tit-Babbler Macronous bornensis

Bold-striped Tit-Babbler is transferred from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Macronous bornensis to Mixornis bornensis.

With the transfer of Bold-striped Tit-Babbler from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies zopherus changes to zophera; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies zaperissus changes to zaperissa; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies javanicus changes to javanica; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies montanus changes to montana; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies argenteus changes to argentea.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Gray-cheeked Tit-Babbler Macronous flavicollis

Gray-cheeked Tit-Babbler is transferred from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Macronous flavicollis to Mixornis flavicollis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Gray-faced Tit-Babbler Macronous kelleyi

Gray-faced Tit-Babbler is transferred from the genus Macronous to Mixornis, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Macronous kelleyi to Mixornis kelleyi.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Brown Tit-Babbler Macronous striaticeps

page 502, Fluffy-backed Tit-Babbler Macronous ptilosus

The spelling of the genus name is corrected from Macronous to Macronus (David et al. 2009).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

page 500, Golden Babbler Stachyridopsis chrysaea

Golden Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); and the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyridopsis chrysaea to Cyanoderma chrysaeum.

With the transfer of Golden Babbler from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies chrysaea changes to chrysaeum; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies aurata changes to auratum; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies assimilis changes to assimile; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies frigida changes to frigidum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 501, Chestnut-winged Babbler Stachyris erythroptera

Chestnut-winged Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyris erythroptera to Cyanoderma erythropterum.

With the transfer of Chestnut-winged Babbler from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies erythroptera changes to erythropterum; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies pyrrhophaea changes to pyrrhophaeum; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies fulviventris changes to fulviventre; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies rufa changes to rufum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 501, Crescent-chested Babbler Stachyris melanothorax

Crescent-chested Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyris melanothorax to Cyanoderma melanothorax.

With the transfer of Crescent-chested Babbler from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies intermedia changes to intermedium; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies baliensis changes to baliense.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 500, Black-chinned Babbler Stachyridopsis pyrrhops

Black-chinned Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyridopsis pyrrhops to Cyanoderma pyrrhops.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 500, Rufous-capped Babbler Stachyridopsis ruficeps

Rufous-capped Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyridopsis ruficeps to Cyanoderma ruficeps.

With the transfer of Rufous-capped Babbler from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies bhamoensis changes to bhamoense; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies praecognita changes to praecognitum; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies pagana changes to paganum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 499, Buff-chested Babbler Stachyris ambigua

Buff-chested Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyris ambigua to Cyanoderma ambiguum.

With the transfer of Buff-chested Babbler from the genus Stachyris to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies ambigua changes to ambiguum; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies adjuncta changes to adjunctum; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies insuspecta changes to insuspectum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 500, Rufous-fronted Babbler Stachyridopsis rufifrons

Rufous-fronted Babbler is transferred from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Stachyridopsis ruffrons to Cyanoderma rufifrons.

With the transfer of Rufous-fronted Babbler from the genus Stachyridopsis to Cyanoderma, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies obscura changes to obscurum; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies sarawacensis changes to sarawacense.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 497, Slender-billed Scimitar-Babbler Xiphirhynchus superciliaris

Slender-billed Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Xiphirhynchus to Pomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Xiphirhynchus superciliaris to Pomatorhinus superciliaris.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Large Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus hypoleucos

Large Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus hypoleucos to Megapomatorhinus hypoleucos.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Black-necklaced Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus erythrocnemis

Black-necklaced Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus erythrocnemis to Megapomatorhinus erythrocnemis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Rusty-cheeked Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus erythrogenys

Rusty-cheeked Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus erythrogenys to Megapomatorhinus erythrogenys.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Spot-breasted Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus mcclellandi

Spot-breasted Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus mcclellandi to Megapomatorhinus mcclellandi.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Black-streaked Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus gravivox

Black-streaked Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus graviox to Megapomatorhinus graviox.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 496, Gray-sided Scimitar-Babbler Pomatorhinus swinhoei

Gray-sided Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Pomatorhinus to Megapomatorhinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Pomatorhinus swinhoei to Megapomatorhinus swinhoei.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 499, Blackish-breasted Babbler Sphenocichla humei

Blackish-breasted Babbler is transferred from the genus Sphenocichla to Stachyris, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Sphenocichla humei to Stachyris humei.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 502, Visayan Miniature-Babbler Micromacronus leytensis

page 502, Mindanao Miniature-Babbler Micromacronus sordidus

Visayan Miniature-Babbler (Micromacronus leytensis) and Mindanao Miniature-Babbler (Micromacronus sordidus) apparently are not babblers (Timaliidae) at all (Moyle et al. 2012, Oliveros et al. 2012), and may be more closely related to Cisticolas and Allies (Cisticolidae) (Oliveros et al. 2012). Provisionally we retain these species in Timaliidae, but place them at the end of the sequence of species.

References:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

Oliveros, C.H., S. Reddy, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. The phylogenetic position of some Philippine ‘‘babblers’’ spans the muscicapoid and sylvioid bird radiations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 799–804.

 

page 488, Malia Malia grata

Malia (Malia grata) apparently is not a babbler (Timaliidae) at all (Moyle et al. 2012, Oliveros et al. 2012), and may be more closely related to Grassbirds and Allies (Locustellidae) (Oliveros et al. 2012). Provisionally we retain this species in Timaliidae, but place it at the end of the sequence of species.

References:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

Oliveros, C.H., S. Reddy, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. The phylogenetic position of some Philippine ‘‘babblers’’ spans the muscicapoid and sylvioid bird radiations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 799–804.

 

pages 442, 493-498, 506-508, 700 Fulvettas and Ground Babblers Pellorneidae

The English name for the family Pellorneidae is changed from “Fulvettas and Ground Babblers” to “Ground Babblers and Allies”. The sequence of the genera and species in Pellorneidae is revised, following Moyle et al. (2012). We retain the babblers (sensu lato) in three families (Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae) but note that some authorities would merge all three of these into a single family, Timaliidae (e.g. Gelang et al. 2009, Moyle et al. 2012). The sequence of the babbler families is changed from Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae to Timaliidae, Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae. The sequence of genera in Pellorneidae that we adopt is:

Malacopteron

Gampsorhynchus

Schoeniparus

Illadopsis

Pellorneum

Kenopia

Napothera

Ptilocichla

Turdinus

Graminicola

Leonardina

Robsonius

References:

Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson. 2009. Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification. Zoologica Scripta 38: 225-236.

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 507, Yellow-throated Fulvetta Schoeniparus cinerea

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Yellow-throated Fulvetta from Schoeniparus cinerea to Schoeniparus cinereus.

 

page 508, Dusky Fulvetta Schoeniparus brunnea

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Dusky Fulvetta from Schoeniparus brunnea to Schoeniparus brunneus.

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies olivacea to olivaceus; correct the spelling of the scientific name for subpecies arguta to argutus; and correct the spelling of the scientific name for subpecies brunnea to brunneus.

Subspecies mandellii, genestieri, and intermedia belong with Rusty-capped Fulvetta (Schoeniparus dubius), and not with Dusky Fulvetta (Robson 2000, Collar and Robson 2007); the scientific names of these subspecies become, respectively, Schoeniparus dubius mandellii, Schoeniparus dubius genestieri, and Schoeniparus dubius intermedius (note the change from “intermedia” to “intermedius“).

References:

Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

page 508, Rusty-capped Fulvetta Schoeniparus dubia

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Rusty-fronted Fulvetta from Schoeniparus dubia to Schoeniparus dubius.

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies dubia to dubius.

 

page 496, Thrush Babbler Ptyrticus turdinus

Thrush Babbler is transferred from the genus Ptyrticus to Illadopsis, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Ptyrticus turdinus to Illadopsis turdina.

With the transfer of Thrush Babbler from the genus Ptyrticus to Illadopsis, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies turdinus changes to turdina.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Short-tailed Babbler Malacocincla malaccensis

Short-tailed Babbler is transferred from the genus Malacocincla to Pellorneum, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Malacocincla malaccensis to Pellorneum malaccense.

With the transfer of Short-tailed Babbler from the genus Malacocincla to Pellorneum, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies malaccensis changes to malaccense; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies saturata changes to saturatum; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies feriata changes to feriatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Ashy-headed Babbler Malacocincla cinereiceps

Ashy-headed Babbler is transferred from the genus Malacocincla to Pellorneum, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Malacocincla cinereiceps to Pellorneum cinereiceps.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, White-chested Babbler Trichastoma rostratum

White-chested Babbler is transferred from the genus Trichastoma to Pellorneum, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Trichastoma rostratum to Pellorneum rostratum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Sulawesi Babbler Trichastoma celebense

Sulawesi Babbler is transferred from the genus Trichastoma to Pellorneum, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Trichastoma celebense to Pellorneum celebense.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Ferruginous Babbler Trichastoma bicolor

Ferruginous Babbler is transferred from the genus Trichastoma to Pellorneum, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Trichastoma bicolor to Pellorneum bicolor.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 497, Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler Jabouilleia danjoui

Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler is transferred from the genus Jabouilleia to Napothera, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Jabouilleia danjoui to Napothera danjoui.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 497, Long-billed Wren-Babbler Rimator malacoptilus

Long-billed Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Rimator to Napothera, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Rimator malacoptilus to Napothera malacoptila.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 497, White-throated Wren-Babbler Rimator pasquieri

White-throated Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Rimator to Napothera, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Rimator pasquieri to Napothera pasquieri.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 497, Sumatran Wren-Babbler Rimator albostriatus

Sumatran Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Rimator to Napothera, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Rimator albostriatus to Napothera albostriata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Abbott’s Babbler Malacocincla abbotti

Abbott’s Babbler is transferred from the genus Malacocincla to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Malacocincla abbotti to Turdinus abbotti.

With the transfer of Abbott’s Babbler from the genus Malacocincla to Turdinus, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies altera changes to alter; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies olivacea changes to olivaceus; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies baweana changes to baweanus.

The correct name for the subspecies of Abbott’s Babbler on Borneo is concretus, not sirense (Mees 1971).

References:

Mees, G.F. 1971. Systematic and faunistic remarks on birds from Borneo and Java, with new records. Zoologische Mededelingen 45: 225-244.

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 493, Horsfield’s Babbler Malacocincla sepiaria

Horsfield’s Babbler is transferred from the genus Malacocincla to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Malacocincla sepiaria to Turdinus sepiarius.

With the transfer of Horsfield’s Babbler from the genus Malacocincla to Turdinus, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies tardinata changes to tardinatus; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies barussana changes to barussanus; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies sepiaria changes to sepiarius.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

page 700, Black-browed Babbler Malacocincla perspicillata

Black-browed Babbler is transferred from the genus Malacocincla to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Malacocincla perspicillata to Turdinus perspicillatus.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 498, Limestone Wren-Babbler Gypsophila crispifrons

Limestone Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Gypsophila to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Gypsophila crispifrons to Turdinus crispifrons.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 498, Streaked Wren-Babbler Napothera brevicaudata

Streaked Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Napothera to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Napothera brevicaudata to Turdinus brevicaudatus.

With the transfer of Streaked Wren-Babbler from the genus Napothera to Turdinus, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies striata changes to striatus; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies brevicaudata changes to brevicaudatus; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies proxima changes to proximus; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies leucosticta changes to leucostictus.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 498, Mountain Wren-Babbler Napothera crassa

Mountain Wren-Babbler is transferred from the genus Napothera to Turdinus, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Napothera crassa to Turdinus crassus.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

Page 493, Bagobo Babbler Trichastoma woodi

Bagobo Babbler is transferred from the genus Trichastoma to Leonardina, following Collar and Robson (2007); the scientific name for this species changes from Trichastoma woodi to Leonardina woodi. Bagobo Babbler apparently is not a babbler (Pellorneidae) at all (Moyle et al. 2012, Oliveros et al. 2012), and may be more closely related to Old World Flycatchers (Muscicapidae) (Oliveros et al. 2012). Provisionally we retain this species in Pellorneidae, but place it at the end of the sequence of species.

References:

Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

Oliveros, C.H., S. Reddy, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. The phylogenetic position of some Philippine ‘‘babblers’’ spans the muscicapoid and sylvioid bird radiations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 799–804.

 

page 498, Rusty-faced Babbler Robsonius rabori

page 498, Gray-banded Babbler Robsonius sorsogonensis

Rusty-faced Babbler (Robsonius rabori) and Gray-banded Babbler (Robsonius sorsogonensis) apparently are not babblers (Pellorneidae) at all (Moyle et al. 2012, Oliveros et al. 2012), and may be more closely related to Grassbirds and Allies (Locustellidae) (Oliveros et al. 2012). Provisionally we retain these species in Pellorneidae, but place them at the end of the sequence of species.

References:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

Oliveros, C.H., S. Reddy, and R.G. Moyle. 2012. The phylogenetic position of some Philippine ‘‘babblers’’ spans the muscicapoid and sylvioid bird radiations. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 799–804.

 

Pages 488-493, 503-510, Laughingthrushes Leiothrichidae

The English name for the family Leiothrichidae is changed from “Laughingthrushes” to “Laughingthrushes and Allies”. The sequence of the genera and species in Leiothrichidae is revised, following Moyle et al. (2012). We retain the babblers (sensu lato) in three families (Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae) but note that some authorities would merge all three of these into a single family, Timaliidae (e.g. Gelang et al. 2009, Moyle et al. 2012). The sequence of the babbler families is changed from Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae, Timaliidae to Timaliidae, Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae. The sequence of genera in Leiothrichidae that we adopt is:

Alcippe

Grammatoptila

Cutia

Turdoides

Garrulax

Ianthocincla

Trochalopteron

Heterophasia

Leiothrix

Minla

Crocias

Liocichla

Actinodura

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 489, Striated Laughingthrush Garrulax striatus

Striated Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Grammatoptila, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax striatus to Grammatoptila striata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 509, White-throated Mountain-Babbler Kupeornis gilberti

White-throated Mountain-Babbler is transferred from the genus Kupeornis to Turdoides, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Kupeornis gilberti to Turdoides gilberti.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 509, Red-collared Mountain-Babbler Kupeornis rufocinctus

Red-collared Mountain-Babbler is transferred from the genus Kupeornis to Turdoides, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Kupeornis rufocinctus to Turdoides rufocincta.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 509, Chapin’s Mountain-Babbler Kupeornis chapini

Chapin’s Mountain-Babbler is transferred from the genus Kupeornis to Turdoides, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Kupeornis chapini to Turdoides chapini.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 509, Capuchin Babbler Phyllanthus atripennis

Capuchin Babbler is transferred from the genus Phyllanthus to Turdoides, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Phyllanthus atripennis to Turdoides atripennis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Sukatschev’s Laughingthrush Garrulax sukatschewi

Sukatschev’s Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax sukatschewi to Ianthocincla sukatschewi.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Moustached Laughingthrush Garrulax cineraceus

Moustached Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax cineraceus to Ianthocincla cineracea.

With the transfer of Moustached Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies cineraceus changes to cineracea; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies strenuus changes to strenua.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Rufous-chinned Laughingthrush Garrulax rufogularis

Rufous-chinned Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax rufogularis to Ianthocincla rufogularis.

With the transfer of Rufous-chinned Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies rufitinctus changes to rufitincta.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Chestnut-eared Laughingthrush Garrulax konkakinhensis

Chestnut-eared Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax konkakinhensis to Ianthocincla konkakinhensis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Spotted Laughingthrush Garrulax ocellatus

Spotted Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax ocellatus to Ianthocincla ocellata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Barred Laughingthrush Garrulax lunulatus

Barred Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax lunulatus to Ianthocincla lunulata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Biet’s Laughingthrush Garrulax bieti

Biet’s Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax bieti to Ianthocincla bieti.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Giant Laughingthrush Garrulax maximus

Giant Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax maximus to Ianthocincla maxima.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 489, Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush Garrulax pectoralis

Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax pectoralis to Ianthocincla pectoralis.

With the transfer of Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies subfusus changes to subfusa, and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies semitorquatus changes to semitorquata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 489, White-throated Laughingthrush Garrulax albogularis

White-throated Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax albogularis to Ianthocincla albogularis.

With the transfer of White-throated Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies eous changes to eoa.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 489, Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush Garrulax ruficeps

Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax ruficeps to Ianthocincla ruficeps.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Rufous-necked Laughingthrush Garrulax ruficollis

Rufous-necked Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax ruficollis to Ianthocincla ruficollis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Chestnut-backed Laughingthrush Garrulax nuchalis

Chestnut-backed Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax nuchalis to Ianthocincla nuchalis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Black-throated Laughingthrush Garrulax chinensis

Black-throated Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax chinensis to Ianthocincla chinensis.

With the transfer of Black-throated Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies lochmius to lochmia, and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies propinquus to propinqua.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, White-cheeked Laughingthrush Garrulax vassal

White-cheeked Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax vassali to Ianthocincla vassali.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Yellow-throated Laughingthrush Garrulax galbanus

Yellow-throated Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax galbanus to Ianthocincla galbana.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Blue-crowned Laughingthrush Garrulax courtoisi

Blue-crowned Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax courtoisi to Ianthocincla courtoisi.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Wynaad Laughingthrush Garrulax delesserti

Wynaad Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax delesserti to Ianthocincla delesserti.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Rufous-vented Laughingthrush Garrulax gularis

Rufous-vented Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax gularis to Ianthocincla gularis.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 490, Pere David’s Laughingthrush Garrulax davidi

Pere David’s Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax davidi to Ianthocincla davidi.

With the transfer of Pere David’s Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies chinganicus changes to chinganica, and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies experrectus changes to experrecta.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Gray-sided Laughingthrush Garrulax caerulatus

Gray-sided Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax caerulatus to Ianthocincla caerulata.

With the transfer of Gray-sided Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies caerulatus changes to caerulata, and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies subcaerulatus changes to subcaerulata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Rusty Laughingthrush Garrulax poecilorhynchus

Rusty Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax poecilorhynchus to Ianthocincla poecilorhyncha.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Buffy Laughingthrush Garrulax berthemyi

Buffy Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax berthemyi to Ianthocincla berthemyi.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush Garrulax mitratus

Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax mitratus to Ianthocincla mitrata.

With the transfer of Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies mitratus to mitrata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush Garrulax treacheri

Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax treacheri to Ianthocincla treacheri.

With the transfer of Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies damnatus changes to damnata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, White-browed Laughingthrush Garrulax sannio

White-browed Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax sannio to Ianthocincla sannio.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 505, Chinese Babax Babax lanceolatus

Chinese Babax is transferred from the genus Babax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Babax lanceolatus to Ianthocincla lanceolata.

Chinese Babax (Chinese) Ianthocincla lanceolata lanceolata/latouchei: With the transfer of Chinese Babax from the genus Babax to Ianthocincla, the spelling of the scientific name for the polytypic group Chinese Babax (Chinese) changes from lanceolatus/latouchei to lanceolata/latouchei, and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies lanceolatus changes to lanceolata.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 505, Giant Babax Babax waddelli

Giant Babax is transferred from the genus Babax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Babax waddelli to Ianthocincla waddelli.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 505, Tibetan Babax Babax koslowi

Tibetan Babax is transferred from the genus Babax to Ianthocincla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Babax koslowi to Ianthocincla koslowi. Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Black-chinned Laughingthrush Garrulax cachinnans

Change the English name of Garrulax cachinnans from “Rufous-breasted Laughingthrush” to “Black-chinned Laughingthrush”.

Black-chinned Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax cachinnans to Trochalopteron cachinnans.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Streaked Laughingthrush Garrulax lineatus

Streaked Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax lineatus to Trochalopteron lineatum.

With the transfer of Streaked Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies lineatus changes to to lineatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Bhutan Laughingthrush Garrulax imbricatus

Bhutan Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax imbricatus to Trochalopteron imbricatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Striped Laughingthrush Garrulax virgatus

Striped Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax virgatus to Trochalopteron virgatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Scaly Laughingthrush Garrulax subunicolor

Scaly Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax subunicolor to Trochalopteron subunicolor.

With the transfer of Scaly Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for this subspecies changes from griseatus to griseatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 491, Brown-capped Laughingthrush Garrulax austeni

Brown-capped Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax austeni to Trochalopteron austeni.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Blue-winged Laughingthrush Garrulax squamatus

Blue-winged Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax squamatus to Trochalopteron squamatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Elliot’s Laughingthrush Garrulax elliotii

Elliot’s Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax elliotii to Trochalopteron elliotii.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Variegated Laughingthrush Garrulax variegatus

Variegated Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax variegatus to Trochalopteron variegatum.

With the transfer of Variegated  Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies similis changes to simile; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies variegatus changes to variegatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Prince Henry’s Laughingthrush Garrulax henrici

Prince Henry’s Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax henrici to Trochalopteron henrici.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Black-faced Laughingthrush Garrulax affinis

Black-faced Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax affinis to Trochalopteron affine.

With the transfer of Black-faced Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies affinis changes to affine; the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies muliensis changes to muliense; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies saturatus changes to saturatum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, White-whiskered Laughingthrush Garrulax morrisonianus

White-whiskered Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax morrisonianus to Trochalopteron morrisonianum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush Garrulax erythrocephalus

Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax erythrocephalus to Trochalopteron erythrocephalum

With the transfer of Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for this subspecies changes from erythrocephalus to erythrocephalum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Assam Laughingthrush Garrulax chrysopterus

Assam Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax chrysopterus to Trochalopteron chrysopterum.

With the transfer of Assam Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies chrysopterus changes to chrysopterum; and the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies erythrolaemus changes to erythrolaemum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Silver-eared Laughingthrush Garrulax melanostigma

Silver-eared Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax melanostigma to Trochalopteron melanostigma.

With the transfer of Silver-eared Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies schistaceus changes to schistaceum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Malayan Laughingthrush Garrulax peninsulae

Malayan Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax peninsulae to Trochalopteron peninsulae.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Golden-winged Laughingthrush Garrulax ngoclinhense

Golden-winged Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax ngoclinhensis to Trochalopteron ngoclinhense.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Collared Laughingthrush Garrulax yersini

CollaredLaughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax yersini to Trochalopteron yersini.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Red-winged Laughingthrush Garrulax formosus

Red-winged Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax formosus to Trochalopteron formosum.

With the transfer of Red-winged Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies formosus changes to formosum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 492, Red-tailed Laughingthrush Garrulax milnei

Red-tailed Laughingthrush is transferred from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Garrulax milnei to Trochalopteron milnei.

With the transfer of Red-tailed Laughingthrush from the genus Garrulax to Trochalopteron, the spelling of the scientific name for subspecies sinianus changes to sinianum.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 509, Rufous-backed Sibia Heterophasia annectens

Rufous-backed Sibia is transferred from the genus Heterophasia to Minla, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Heterophasia annectens to Minla annectens. Insert Rufous-backed Sibia immediately following Red-tailed Minla (Minla ignotincta).

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 507, Blue-winged Minla Minla cyanouroptera

Blue-winged Minla is transferred from the genus Minla to Actinodura, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Minla cyanouroptera to Actinodura cyanouroptera.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 507, Chestnut-tailed Minla Minla strigula

Chestnut-tailed Minla is transferred from the genus Minla to Actinodura, following Moyle et al. (2012); the scientific name for this species changes from Minla strigula to Actinodura strigula. Reference

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 448, Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa latirostris

Subspecies Muscicapa latirostris umbrosa of Asian Brown Flycatcher is transferred to Brown-streaked Flycatcher (Muscicapa williamsoni), following Rheindt and Eaton (2012), and becomes Muscicapa williamsoni umbrosa.

Reference:

Rheindt, F.E., and J.A. Eaton. 2012. Notes on the life-history and taxonomy of Muscicapa dauurica umbrosa, an overlooked Bornean canopy bird. Forktail 28: 144-146.

 

Page 448, Brown-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa williamsoni

Revise the range of Muscicapa williamsoni williamsoni from “S Myanmar to pen. Thailand, Malaya, s Vietnam and Sumatra” to “southern Myanmar to northern Malaysia; winters from the Malay Peninsula to Sumatra and Siberut Island”.

 

page 455, Forest Robin Stiphrornis erythrothorax

Add subspecies Stiphrornis erythrothorax pyrrholaemus Schmidt and Angehr 2008 (in Schmidt et al. 2008), with range “coastal Gabon, south of the Ogooué River”. This taxon was described as a species. The taxonomic status of the five known forms of Forest Robin (Stiphrornis) is unclear, and the ranges of some (including pyrrholaemus) also are not well known. Some or all of these subspecies may represent distinct species. We recognize each of the five taxa as monotypic groups. The English name for the group Stiphrornis erythrothorax pyrrholaemus is Forest Robin (Olive-backed).

Reference:

Schmidt, B.K., J.T. Foster, G.R. Angehr, K.L. Durrant, and R.C. Fleisher. 2008. A new species of African forest robin from Gabon (Passeriformes: Muscicapidae: Stiphrornis). Zootaxa 1850: 27-42.

 

page 456,  Common Nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos

Correct the scientific name for subspecies Luscinia megarhynchos hafizi of Common Nightingale to Luscinia megarhynchos golzii (Dickinson 2008).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C. 2008. The name for the easternmost population of Common Nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 141-142.

 

page 402, Ceylon Whistling-Thrush Myophonus blighi

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Dickinson 2003. Harrison 2011), change the English name for Myophonus blighi from “Ceylon Whistling-Thrush” to “Sri Lanka Whistling-Thrush”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 402, Formosan Whistling-Thrush Myophonus insularis

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Dickinson 2003, Brazil 2009), change the English name for Myophonus insularis from “Formosan Whistling-Thrush” to “Taiwan Whistling-Thrush”.

References:

Brazil, M.2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 462, Canary Island Stonechat Saxicola dacotiae

Change the English name for Saxicola dacotiae from “Canary Island Stonechat” to “Fuerteventura Stonechat”.

 

page 404, Russet-tailed Thrush Zoothera heinei

Correct the spelling of the name of eichhornii to eichhorni.

 

page 406, Russet Nightingale-Thrush Catharus occidentalis

Subspecies Catharus occidentalis durangensis is synomymized with Catharus occidentalis lambi, following Phillips (1991). Revise the range of lambi from “Mountains of e Mexico (n Puebla)” to “central Mexico, from Durango south to northwestern Jalisco, and from southeastern Coahuila and southwestern Tamaulipas south to northeastern Guanajuato and northwestern Puebla”.

Revise the range of Catharus occidentalis fulvescens, from “Mts. of central Mexico (Jalisco to s Tamaulipas and w Puebla)” to “south central Mexico, from southern Jalisco east to Hidalgo and south to Guerrero and east central Puebla”, following Phillips (1991).

Revise the range of Catharus occidentalis occidentalis from “Mts. of se Mexico (e San Luis Potosí to Puebla and s Oaxaca)” to “central and eastern Oaxaca, Mexico”, following Phillips (1991).

Reference:

Phillips, A.R. 1991. The known birds of North and Middle America. Part II. Bombycillidae; Sylviidae to Sturnidae; Vireonidae. Privately published, Denver, Colorado.

 

page 411, Glossy-black Thrush Turdus serranus

Revise the range of Turdus serranus serranus from “Mountains of Peru, Bolivia and nw Argentina (Salta and Jujuy)” to “Andes of Peru and Bolivia”.

Insert a newly added subspecies, Turdus serranus continoi, with range “northwestern Argentina (Jujuy and Salta)” (Fraga and Dickinson 2008).

Reference:

Fraga, R.M., and E.C. Dickinson. 2008. A substitute name for Turdus serranus unicolor Olrog & Contino. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 70-71.

 

Pages 397-399, mockingbirds and thrashers Mimidae

The sequence of genera and species in Mockingbirds and Thrashers (Mimidae) is revised, following NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), based on Lovette et al. (2012).

The sequence of genera that we adopt is:

Melanotis

Melanoptila

Dumetella

Ramphocinclus

Allenia

Margarops

Cinclocerthia

Toxostoma

Oreoscoptes

Mimus

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Lovette, I.J., B.S. Arbogast, R.L. Curry, R.M. Zink, C.A. Botero, J.P. Sullivan,  A.L. Talaba, R.B. Harris, D.R. Rubenstein, R.E. Ricklefs, and E.  Bermingham. 2012. Phylogenetic relationships of the mockingbirds and thrashers (Aves: Mimidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 219-229.

 

page 596, Metallic Starling Aplonis metallica

Revise the range of subspecies Aplonis metallica nitida from “Bismarck Archipelago” to “Admiralty Islands (Rambutyo, Tong, and outer Admiralty Islands), Bismark Archipelago, and Solomon Islands”.

Revise the range of subspecies Aplonis metallica purpureiceps from “Admiralty Islands” to “Admiralty Islands (Manus and Los Negros Islands)”.

 

page 598, Ceylon Myna Gracula ptilogenys

In accord with recent literature (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Dickinson 2003. Harrison 2011), change the English name for Gracula ptilogenys from “Ceylon Myna” to “Sri Lanka Myna”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C. (editor). 2003. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Third edition.            Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Harrison, J. 2011. A field guide to the birds of Sri Lanka. Second edition. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 599, Greater Blue-eared Glossy-Starling Lamprotornis chalybaeus

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies scyobius to sycobius.

 

page 600, Purple Glossy-Starling Lamprotornis purpureus

Revise the range of subspecies Lamprotornis purpureus amethystinus from “Cameroon to we Kenya” to “Cameroon to western Kenya”.

 

page 548, Fire-breasted Flowerpecker Dicaeum ignipectus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Fire-breasted Flowerpecker from Dicaeum ignipectum to Dicaeum ignipectus.

Correct the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies of Fire-breasted Flowerpecker from ignipectum to ignipectus.

 

page 538, Golden-winged Sunbird Drepanorhynchus reichenowi

Correct the spelling of the name of shelleyae to shellyae.

 

Page 542, sunbirds Aethopyga

The sequence of species of Aethopyga sunbirds is revised, following Hosner et al. (2013b). The sequence of species that we adopt is:

Aethopyga duyvenbodei          Elegant Sunbird

Aethopyga ignicauda              Fire-tailed Sunbird

Aethopyga saturata                 Black-throated Sunbird

Aethopyga gouldiae                Gould’s Sunbird

Aethopyga nipalensis              Green-tailed Sunbird

Aethopyga shelleyi                  Lovely Sunbird

Aethopyga temminckii             Temminck’s Sunbird

Aethopyga mystacalis              Javan Sunbird

Aethopyga vigorsii                  Vigors’s Sunbird

Aethopyga siparaja                 Crimson Sunbird

Aethopyga magnifica              Magnificent Sunbird

Aethopyga christinae               Fork-tailed Sunbird

Aethopyga bella                      Handsome Sunbird

Aethopyga eximia                    White-flanked Sunbird

Aethopyga flagrans                 Flaming Sunbird

Aethopyga guimarasensis       Maroon-naped Sunbird

Aethopyga pulcherrima           Metallic-winged Sunbird

Aethopyga jefferyi                   Mountain Sunbird

Aethopyga decorosa                Bohol Sunbird

Aethopyga linaraborae           Lina’s Sunbird

Aethopyga primigenia             Gray-hooded Sunbird

Aethopyga tibolii                     Tboli Sunbird

Reference:

Hosner, P.A., A.S. Nyári, and R.G. Moyle. 2013b. Water barriers and intra-island isolation contribute to diversification in the insular Aethopyga sunbirds (Aves: Nectariniidae). Journal of Biogeography 40: 1094–1106.

 

page 543, Scarlet Sunbird Aethopyga mystacalis

Change the English name for Aethopyga mystacalis from “Scarlet Sunbird” to “Javan Sunbird”.

 

page 543, Western Crimson Sunbird Aethopyga vigorsii

Change the English name of Aethopyga vigorsii from “Western Crimson Sunbird” to “Vigors’s Sunbird”, in accord with regional usage (Rasmussen and Anderton 2005).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 543, Eastern Crimson Sunbird Aethopyga siparaja

Change the English name of Aethopyga siparaja from “Eastern Crimson Sunbird” to “Crimson Sunbird”, in accord with regional usage (Rasmussen and Anderton 2005).

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 367,  Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis

Revise the range of subspecies Motacilla tschutschensis plexa from “N Siberia; >India and se Asia” to “Breeds northern Siberia; winter range incompletely known, but winters in southeast Asia, west perhaps to India”

Subspecies Motacilla tschutschensis angarensis and Motacilla tschutschensis simillima are merged with Motacilla tschutschensis tschutschensis, following Alström and Mild (2003). Revise the range of tschutschensis from “NE Siberia and extreme nw N America; >se Asia, Indonesia” to “Breeds eastern Siberia south to western Transbaikalia, southern Siberia, northern Mongolia, Kamchatka, Commander and northern Kurile Islands, and extreme northwestern North America; winters to southeastern China (and Taiwan?), the Philippines, and southeastern Asia from Myanmar east to Indochina and south to Indonesia”.

Subspecies taivana, previously listed as a subspecies of Western Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava taivana), belongs with Eastern Yellow Wagtail, as Motacilla tschutschensis taivana (Alström and Mild 2003, Pavlova et al. 2003).

Subspecies macronyx, previously listed as a subspecies of Western Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava macronyx), belongs with Eastern Yellow Wagtail, as Motacilla tschutschensis macronyx (Alström and Mild 2003, Pavlova et al. 2003).

References:

Alström, P. and K. Mild. 2003. Pipits and wagtails. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Pavolova, A., R.M. Zink, S.V. Drovetski, Y. Red’kin, and S. Rowher. 2003. Phylogeographic patterns in Motacilla flava and Motacilla citreola: species limits and population history. Auk 120: 744-758.

 

page 367, White Wagtail Motacilla alba

Revise the range of subspecies Motacilla alba ocularis from “N Siberia and ne Alaska; >Indian subcontinent and s Asia” to “breeds northern Siberia and western Alaska; winters from northeastern India and China south to the Philippines, the Malay Peninsula and Borneo”.

 

page 364, Buffy Pipit Anthus vaalensis

Revise the range of subspecies Anthus vaalensis vaalensis from “S Botswana to s Mozambique, nevSouth Africa and w Lesotho” to “southern Botswana to southern Mozambique, South Africa, and western Lesotho”.

 

page 366, Tree Pipit Anthus trivialis

Subspecies Anthus trivialis schlueteri is deleted, as a synonym of Anthus trivialis trivialis (Alström and Mild 2003). Revise the range of Anthus trivialis trivialis from “Europe to L. Baikal and n Iran; >Africa and India” to “breeds from Europe east to northern Iran, Siberia, and northwestern China; winters in subSaharan Africa and on the Indian subcontinent”.

Reference:

Alström, P. and K. Mild. 2003. Pipits and wagtails. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

page 436, Sao Tome Short-tail Amaurocichla bocagei

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for Sao Tome Short-tail from Amaurocichla bocagei to Amaurocichla bocagii.

 

page 645, Gray-headed Warbler Myiothlypis griseiceps

Gray-headed Warbler (Myiothlypis griseiceps) is transferred to the genus Basileuterus, following SACC Proposal 571. Gray-headed Warbler is positioned at the end of Basileuterus, immediately following Three-banded Warbler (Basileuterus trifasciatus).

 

page 646, Santa Marta Warbler Basileuterus basilicus

Santa Marta Warbler (Basileuterus basilicus) is transferred to the genus Myiothlypis, and the scientific name becomes Myiothlypis basilica, following SACC Proposal 571. Santa Marta Warbler is positioned at the beginning of Myiothlypis, immediately preceding Citrine Warbler (Myiothlypis luteoviridis).

 

page 650, Superciliaried Hemispingus Hemispingus superciliaris

Revise the range of the monotypic group Superciliaried Hemispingus (Yellow-browed) (Hemispingus superciliaris chrysophrys) from “Andes of sw Venezuela (Trujillo, Mérida and Táchira)” to “Andes of northwestern Venezuela (Trujillo, Mérida and Táchira)”.

 

page 651, Gray-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus reyi

Revise the range of Gray-capped Hemispingus from “Andes of sw Venezuela (Trujillo, Mérida and Táchira)” to “Andes of northwestern Venezuela (Trujillo, Mérida and Táchira)”.

 

pages, 649, 655-659 tanagers and allies Thraupidae

The sequence of some genera of Tanagers and Allies (Thraupidae) is revised, following SACC Proposal 437, which is based on Sedano and Burns (2010). The sequence that we adopt for the affected genera is

Calochaetes

Cyanicterus

Bangsia

Wetmorethraupis

Buthraupis

Cnemathraupis

Chlorornis

Anisognathus

Dubusia

Stephanophorus

Iridosornis

Pipraeidea

Chlorochrysa

Thraupis

Reference:

Sedano, R.E., and K.J. Burns. 2010. Are the Northern Andes a species pump for Neotropical birds? Phylogenetics and biogeography of a clade of Neotropical tanagers (Aves: Thraupini). Journal of Biogeography 37: 325–343.

 

page 657, Black-chested Mountain-Tanager Buthraupis eximia

The scientific name for Black-chested Mountain-Tanager (Buthraupis eximia) is changed to Cnemathraupis eximia, following SACC Proposal 437, which is based on Sedano and Burns (2010).

Reference:

Sedano, R.E., and K.J. Burns. 2010. Are the Northern Andes a species pump for Neotropical birds? Phylogenetics and biogeography of a clade of Neotropical tanagers (Aves: Thraupini). Journal of Biogeography 37: 325–343.

 

page 657, Golden-backed Mountain-Tanager Buthraupis aureodorsalis

The scientific name for Golden-backed Mountain-Tanager (Buthraupis aureodorsalis) is changed to Cnemathraupis aureodorsalis, following SACC Proposal 437, which is based on Sedano and Burns (2010).

Reference:

Sedano, R.E., and K.J. Burns. 2010. Are the Northern Andes a species pump for Neotropical birds? Phylogenetics and biogeography of a clade of Neotropical tanagers (Aves: Thraupini). Journal of Biogeography 37: 325–343.

 

page 658, Lacrimose Mountain-Tanager Anisognathus lacrymosus

Insert the newly added subspecies of Lacrimose Mountain-Tanager, Anisognathus lacrymosus yariguierum Donegan and Avedaño 2010, immediately following Anisognathus lacrymosus tamae; the range of subspecies yariguierum is “northern Colombia (Serranía de los Yariguíes, Santandar)”.

Reference:

Donegan, T.M., and J.E. Avedaño. 2010. A new subspecies of mountain tanager in the Anisognathus lacrymosus complex from the Yariguíes Mountains of Colombia. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 130: 13-32.

 

Page 658, Buff-breasted Mountain-Tanager Dubusia taeniata

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Buff-breasted Mountain-Tanager (Buff-breasted) from Dubusia taeniata/carrikeri to Dubusia taeniata taeniata/carrikeri.

 

page 658, Chestnut-bellied Mountain-Tanager Delothraupis castaneoventris

The scientific name for Chestnut-bellied Mountain-Tanager (Delothraupis castaneoventris) is changed to Dubusia castaneoventris, following SACC Proposal 437, which is based on Sedano and Burns (2010).

Reference:

Sedano, R.E., and K.J. Burns. 2010. Are the Northern Andes a species pump for Neotropical birds? Phylogenetics and biogeography of a clade of Neotropical tanagers (Aves: Thraupini). Journal of Biogeography 37: 325–343.

 

page 656, Blue-and-yellow Tanager Thraupis bonariensis

The scientific name for Blue-and-yellow Tanager (Thraupis bonariensis) is changed to Pipraeidea bonariensis, following SACC Proposal 437, which is based on Sedano and Burns (2010).

Reference:

Sedano, R.E., and K.J. Burns. 2010. Are the Northern Andes a species pump for Neotropical birds? Phylogenetics and biogeography of a clade of Neotropical tanagers (Aves: Thraupini). Journal of Biogeography 37: 325–343.

 

page 661, Burnished-buff Tanager Tangara cayana

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Burnished-buff Tanager (Rufous-crowned) from Tangara cayana/fulvescens to Tangara cayana cayana/fulvescens.

 

Page 652, Black-and-yellow Tanager Chrysothlypis chrysomelas

Insert the newly added subspecies Chrysothlypis chrysomelas titanota Olson 1981 immediately following the species heading for Black-and-yellow Tanager; the range of this subspecies is “Caribbean slope of Costa Rica and western Panama”.

Revise the range of nominate Chrysothlypis chrysomelas chrysomelas from “Caribbean slope of e Costa Rica and w Panama” to “central Panama” (Olson 1981).

Reference:

Olson, S.L. 1981. Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373.

 

page 668, Cinereous Finch Piezorhina cinerea

In accord with SACC (Proposal 538, following Gregory and Dickinson (2012), the scientific name for Cinereous Finch is changed from Piezorhina cinerea to Piezorina cinerea.

Reference:

Gregory, S.M.S., and E.C. Dickinson. 2012. An assessment of three little-noticed papers on avian nomenclature by G. N. Kashin during 1978–1982. Zootaxa 3340: 44-58.

 

page 672, Great-billed Seed-Finch Oryzoborus maximiliani

Revise the range of Great-billed Seed-Finch from “SE Colombia to n Bolivia, the Guianas, Amazonian and se Brazil” to “e Colombia east to Venezuela, Guyana, French Guiana, and ne Brazil; and from e Bolivia east to south central and se Brazil”.

 

page 689, Rufous-bellied Saltator Saltator rufiventris

Rufous-bellied Saltator (Saltator rufiventris) is sister to (closely related to) tanagers of the genus Dubusia, and is not closely related to other saltators (Saltator) (see SACC Proposal 427, which in turn is based on Klicka et al. 2007). There is reluctance to merge Rufous-bellied Saltator into Dubusia; apparently there is no other generic name available for this species; but placing Rufous-bellied Saltator in its correct phylogenetic position would render the genus Saltator wildly paraphyletic. We assume – we very much hope – that a nomenclatural fix is in preparation.

Reference:

Klicka, J., K. Burns, and G.M. Spellman. 2007. Defining a monophyletic Cardinalini: a molecular perspective. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45: 1014–1032.

 

page 679, White-browed Brush-Finch Arremon torquatus

Revise the range of subspecies Arremon torquatus torquatus from “Andes of w Bolivia (La Paz and w Cochabamba)” to “Andes of extreme southern Peru (southern Puno) and of northwestern Bolivia (La Paz and western Cochabamba)” (Robbins et al. 2013).

Reference:

Robbins, M.B., T.S. Schulenberg, D.F. Lane, A.M. Cuervo, L.C. Binford, Á.S. Nyári, M. Combe, E. Arbeláez-Cortés, W. Wehtje, and A. Lira-Noreiga. 2013. Abra Maruncunca, dpto. Puno, Peru, revisted: vegetation cover and avifauna changes over a 30-year period. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 133: 31-51.

 

Page 679, Black-striped Sparrow Arremonops conirostris

Insert a newly added subspecies of Black-striped Sparrow, Arremonops conirostris pastazae, immediately following Arremonops conirostris umbrinus; the range of pastazae is “southeastern Ecuador (Pastaza River drainage)” (Krabbe and Stejskal 2008).

Reference:

Krabbe, N., and D.J. Stejskal. 2008. A new subspecies of Black-striped Sparrow Arremonops conirostris from south-eastern Ecuador. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 126-130.

 

page 681, Abert’s Towhee Melozone aberti

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies dumeticolus to dumeticola.

 

page 683, Savannah Sparrow Passerculus sandwichensis

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies athinus to anthinus.

 

page 685, Song Sparrow Melospiza melodia

The sequence and composition of groups of Song Sparrow are revised, with the recognition of several new groups and the deletion of 14 subspecies; this revision primarily is based on Patten and Pruett (2009).

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Song Sparrow (Eastern) from Melospiza melodia [melodia Group] to Melospiza melodia melodia/atlantica. Subspecies Melospiza melodia juddi and Melospiza melodia euphonia both are synonymized with Melospiza melodia melodia (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of melodia from “SE Canada and ne US; > to e Texas and s Florida” to “northeastern British Columbia to eastern Canada, and northeastern Montana to northern Arkansas and wesern North Carolina; winters south to Texas, southeastern US, Florida”.

We recognize a new polytypic group, Song Sparrow (Aleutian) (Melospiza melodia sanaka/maxima). Subspecies Melospiza melodia maxima and Melospiza melodia sanaka are transferred from the polytypic group Song Sparrow (Pacific Northwest) (Melospiza melodia [rufina Group]) to the newly recognized Song Sparrow (Aleutians) (Melospiza melodia sanaka/maxima). Subspecies Melospiza melodia amaka is synonymized with sanaka (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of sanaka from “Aleutian Islands (Seguam to Unimak and Sanak to Semidi)” to “Aleutian Islands (Seguam to Unimak, Sanak to Amak)”.

Revise the range of Melospiza melodia morphna from “SW British Columbia to sw Oregon; > to n California” to “southwestern British Columbia to southwestern Oregon; winters to central California”.

We recognize a new polytypic group, Song Sparrow (Interior West) (Melospiza melodia montana/merrilli). Subspecies Melospiza melodia inexspectata is synonymized with Melospiza melodia merrilli (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of merrilli from “S Br. Col. to sw Alberta and nw Montana; > to n Mexico” to “southeastern Alaska (Glacier Bay), central British Columbia to southwestern Alberta and northwestern Montana; winters to central California, northern Mexico”. Subspecies Melospiza melodia fisherella is synonymized with Melospiza melodia montana (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of montana from “NE Oregon to w Idaho, e Ariz., and n N. Mex.; > to Sonora” to “eastern Oregon, northeastern California to central Montana, western Colorado, northeastern Arizona, northern New Mexico; winters to central California, northwestern Mexico”.

With the removal of subspecies Melospiza melodia samuelis from the polytypic group Song Sparrow (California) (see below), the scientific name for this group changes from Melospiza melodia [samuelis Group] to Melospiza melodia [heermanni Group].

Subspecies Melospiza melodia cleonensisis transferred from polytypic group Song Sparrow (Pacific Northwest) (Melospiza melodia [rufina Group]) to the polytypic group Song Sparrow (California) (Melospiza melodia [heermanni Group]). Subspecies Melospiza melodia mailliardi and Melospiza melodia cooperi both are synonymized with Melospiza melodia heermanni (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of heermanni from “S California (Merced Co. to Kern County and Kings Canyon)” to “cistmontane California (Central Valley, Suisan Bay to Mojave, Colorado deserts), coastal Calif (from northern Monterey County to northern Baja)”.

Subspecies Melospiza melodia micronyx, Melospiza melodia clementae, and Melospiza melodia coronatorum all are synonymized with Melospiza melodia graminea (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of graminea from “Santa Barbara I. (off coastal s California)” to “Channel Is. (off southern California), Los Coronados Is. (off northwestern Baja California)”.

We recognize a new monotypic group, Song Sparrow (San Pablo Saltmarsh) (Melospiza melodia samuelis).

We recognize a new monotypic group, Song Sparrow (South San Francisco Bay Saltmarsh) (Melospiza melodia pusillula).

Subspecies Melospiza melodia saltonis is synonymized with Melospiza melodia fallax (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of fallax from “SE Nevada to sw Utah, Arizona and nw Mexico (ne Sonora)” to “southern Nevada to southwestern Utah, southeastern Calif to northwestern Baja California, western Mexico (northeastern Sonora)”.

Subspecies Melospiza melodia goldmani transferred from the polytypic group Song Sparrow (Mexican) (Melospiza melodia [mexicana Group]) to Song Sparrow (Southwest) (Melospiza melodia [fallax Group]).

Subspecies Melospiza melodia niceae and Melospiza melodia azteca both are synonymized with Melospiza melodia mexicana (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of mexicana from “Wetlands of s-central Mexico (Tlaxcala and Puebla)” to “wetlands of central Mexico (Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Puebla, Distrito Federal and México)”.

Subspecies Melospiza melodia  yuriria is synonymized with Melospiza melodia adusta (Patten and Pruett 2009). Revise the range of adusta from “SW Mexico (Lago Pátzcuaro in Michoacán)” to “central and southwestern Mexico (Río Lerma River from Lago Yuriria to southern Guanajuato, Lago Pátzcuaro in Michoacán)”.

Reference:

Patten, M.A., and Pruett, C.L. 2009. The Song Sparrow, Melospiza melodia, as a ring species: patterns of geographic variation, a revision of subspecies, and implications for speciation. Systematics and Biodiversity 7: 33-62.

 

page 686, Rufous-collared Sparrow Zonotrichia capensis

Subspecies Zonotrichia capensis orestera is considered to be a synonym of Zonotrichia capensis costaricensis, and is deleted (Olson 1981).

Reference:

Olson, S.L. 1981. Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373.

 

page 649, Common Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus ophthalmicus

In accord with SACC (Proposal 521) and NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), the scientific name of this species is changed from Chlorospingus ophthalmicus to Chlorospingus flavopectus. Additionally, in accord with SACC (Proposal 579) we change the English group name for all species of Chlorospingus from bush-tanager to chlorospingus (note that NACC has not yet adopted this change); the English name for Chlorospingus flavopectus changes from Common Bush-Tanager to Common Chlorospingus.

Following the changes noted above for the scientific and English names for the species, the scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Northeast Mexico) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus ophthalmicus) change to Common Chlorospingus (Northeast Mexico) (Chlorospingus flavopectus ophthalmicus).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Southwest Mexico) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus albifrons) change to Common Chlorospingus (Southwest Mexico) (Chlorospingus flavopectus albifrons).

The scientific and English names for the polytypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Middle America) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus [postocularis Group]) change to Common Chlorospingus (Middle America) (Chlorospingus flavopectus [postocularis Group]).

Revise the range of subspecies Chlorospingus flavopectus regionalis from “Subtropical Nicaragua and e Costa Ricaí)” to “subtropical Nicaragua south through Costa Rica to western Panama (west of the summit of Volcán Barú)” (Olson 1981).

Revise the range of subspecies Chlorospingus flavopectus novicius from “Subtropical sw Costa Rica and w Panama (Chiriquí)” to “western Panama (western Chiriquí, east of the summit of Volcán Barú [Volcán de Chiriquí])” (Olson 1981).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Central Panama) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus punctulatus) change to Common Chlorospingus (Central Panama) (Chlorospingus flavopectus punctulatus).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Venezuela) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus [venezuelanus Group]) change to Common Chlorospingus (Venezuela) (Chlorospingus flavopectus [venezuelanus Group]).

The scientific and English names for the polytypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Northern Andes) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus [flavopectus Group]) change to Common Chlorospingus (Northern Andes) (Chlorospingus flavopectus [flavopectus Group]).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (cinereocephalus) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus cinereocephalus) change to Common Chlorospingus (cinereocephalus) (Chlorospingus flavopectus cinereocephalus).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Southern Peru) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus peruvianus) change to Common Chlorospingus (Southern Peru) (Chlorospingus flavopectus peruvianus).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Northern Bolivia) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus bolivianus) change to Common Chlorospingus (Northern Bolivia) (Chlorospingus flavopectus bolivianus).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Southern Bolivia) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus fulvigularis) change to Common Chlorospingus (Southern Bolivia) (Chlorospingus flavopectus fulvigularis).

The scientific and English names for the monotypic group Common Bush-Tanager (Argentina) (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus argentinus) change to Common Chlorospingus (Argentina) (Chlorospingus flavopectus argentinus).

References:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

Olson, S.L. 1981. Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373

 

page 649, Tacarcuna Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus tacarcunae

page 649, Pirre Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus inornatus

page 650, Dusky Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus semifuscus

page 650, Sooty-capped Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus pileatus

page 650, Short-billed Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus parvirostris

page 650, Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus flavigularis

page 650, Yellow-green Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus flavovirens

page 650, Ashy-throated Bush-Tanager Chlorospingus canigularis

In accord with SACC (Proposal 579) we change the English group name for all species of Chlorospingus from bush-tanager to chlorospingus (note that NACC has not yet adopted this change). The new species names for these species are:

Tacarcuna Chlorospingus Chlorospingus tacarcunae

Pirre Chlorospingus Chlorospingus inornatus

Dusky Chlorospingus Chlorospingus semifuscus

Sooty-capped Chlorospingus Chlorospingus pileatus

Short-billed Chlorospingus Chlorospingus parvirostris

Yellow-throated Chlorospingus Chlorospingus flavigularis

Yellow-green Chlorospingus Chlorospingus flavovirens

Ashy-throated Chlorospingus Chlorospingus canigularis

The English names for several groups are affected by these changes as well:

The English name for the monotypic group Chlorospingus flavigularis hypophaeus changes from Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager (Drab-breasted) to Yellow-throated Chlorospingus (Drab-breasted).

The English name for the polytypic group Chlorospingus flavigularis flavigularis/marginatus changes from Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager (Yellow-throated) to Yellow-throated Chlorospingus (Yellow-throated).

The English name for the monotypic group Chlorospingus canigularis olivaceiceps changes from Ashy-throated Bush-Tanager (Olive-crowned) to Ashy-throated Chlorospingus (Olive-crowned).

The English name for the polytypic group Chlorospingus canigularis [canigularis Group] changes from Ashy-throated Bush-Tanager (Ashy-throated) to Ashy-throated Chlorospingus (Ashy-throated).

 

page 666, Golden-breasted Bunting Emberiza flaviventris

Revise the range of subspecies Emberiza flaviventris flavigaster from “S edge of Sahara from Mauretania to Eritrea” to “southern edge of the Sahara from Mauritania to Eritrea”.

 

page 692, Red-winged Blackbird Agelaius phoeniceus

Subspecies Agelaius phoeniceus aciculatus and Agelaius phoeniceus neutralis are transferred from the group Red-winged Blackbird (California Bicolored) (Agelaius phoeniceus [californicus Group]) to the group Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) (Agelaius phoeniceus [phoeniceus Group]).

Subspecies Agelaius phoeniceus aciculatus and Agelaius phoeniceus neutralis are transferred from the group Red-winged Blackbird (California Bicolored) (Agelaius phoeniceus [californicus Group]) to the group Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) (Agelaius phoeniceus [phoeniceus Group]).

With the transfer of subspecies Agelaius phoeniceus aciculatus and Agelaius phoeniceus neutralis to the group Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) (Agelaius phoeniceus [phoeniceus Group]), only two subspecies remain in the group Red-winged Blackbird (California Bicolored). The scientific name for this group changes from Agelaius phoeniceus [californicus Group] to Agelaius phoeniceus californicus/mailliardorum.

 

page 693, Peruvian Meadowlark Sturnella bellicosa

Subspecies Sturnella bellicosa catamarcanus properly belongs with Long-tailed Meadowlark (Sturnella loyca); its scientific name becomes Sturnella loyca catamarcana (note the change in the spelling of the subspecies name).

 

page 695, Yellow-backed Oriole Icterus chrysater

Revise the range of subspecies Icterus chrysater giraudii from “Central Colombia to n Venezuela” to “Panama (west to Veraguas) to northern and western Colombia and northern Venezuela” (Olson 1981).

Revise the range of subspecies Icterus chrysater hondae from “Panama (west to Veraguas) to n Colombia” to “Colombia (upper Magdalena Valley)”. The validity of this subspecies is in doubt; it may be a synonym of Icterus chrysater giraudii (Olson 1981).

Reference:

Olson, S.L. 1981. Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373.

 

page 695, Yellow-tailed Oriole Icterus mesomelas

Revise the range of subspecies Icterus mesomelas salvinii from “Caribbean lowlands of Nicaragua to e Panama” to “Caribbean lowlands of Nicaragua to northwestern Panama” (Olson 1981).

Revise the range of subspecies Icterus mesomelas carrikeri from “Tropical n and w Colombia to nw Venezuela” to “Panama to northern and western Colombia and northwestern Venezuela” (Olson 1981).

Reference:

Olson, S.L. 1981.Systematic notes on certain oscines from Panama and adjacent areas (Aves: Passeriformes). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 363-373.

 

pages 638-639, 701 Hawaiian honeycreepers

The Hawaiian honeycreepers are embedded within Siskins, Crossbills, and Allies (Fringillidae), and, following NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), these species are moved to a new position following the bullfinches (Pyrrhula).

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 638, Hawaii Creeper Oreomystis mana

In accord with NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), move Hawaii Creeper from the genus Oreomystis to genus Loxops; the scientific name for this species becomes Loxops mana.

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 639, Apapane Himatione sanguinea

The range of the monotypic group Apapane (Laysan Island) Himatione sanguinea fraithii is “Laysan (Hawaiian Islands)”; this range statement was deleted inadvertently from the Clement Checklist 6.7 spreadsheet.

 

page 629, Purple Finch Haemorhous purpureus

page 629, Cassin’s Finch Haemorhous cassinii

pafe 629, House Finch Haemorhous mexicanus

In accord with NACC (Chesser et al. 2013), the sequence of Haemorhous finches is revised, with the new sequence

House Finch Haemorhous mexicanus

Purple Finch Haemorhous purpureus

Cassin’s Finch Haemorhous cassinii

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., R.C. Banks, F.K. Barker, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2013. Fifty-fourth supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 130: 558-571.

 

page 633, Twite Carduelis flavirostris

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies atlaica to altaica.

 

page 634, Forest Canary Serinus scotops

The earliest use of the subspecies name transvaalensis in Serinus is for a subspecies of Serinus gularis (Streaky-headed Seedeater), although Serinus gularis transvaalensis now usually is considered to be a synonym of Serinus gularis gularis. Correct the scientific name for the subspecies of Forest Canary formerly known as Serinus scotops transvaalensis to Serinus scotops kirbyi (Dowsett 2012).

Reference:

Dowsett, R.J. 2012. Two pre-occupied names in African ornithology. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 132: 69-70.

 

page 602, Dead Sea Sparrow Passer moabiticus

Correct the spelling of the name of subspecies mesoptamicus to mesopotamicus.

 

page 602, Socotra Sparrow Passer insularis

Insert a newly added subspecies of Socotra Sparrow, Passer insularis hemileucus, immediately following the species heading for Socotra Sparrow (Passer insularis); the range of subspecies hemileucus is “Socotra Islands (Abd ‘ Al Kuri)” (Kirwan 2008).

With the addition of of Passer insularis hemileucus, Socotra Sparrow no longer is monotypic. Insert Passer insularis insularis immediately following Passer insularis hemileucus, and revise the range from “Socotra and Abd-al-Küri I. (off Somalia)” to “Socotra Islands (Socotra, Samha, and Darsa)”.

Reference:

Kirwan, G.M. 2008. Studies of Socotran birds III. Morphological and mensural evidence for a ‘new’ species in the Rufous Sparrow Passer motitensis complex endemic to the island of Abd ‘Al-Kuri, with the validation of Passer insularis Sclater & Hartlaub, 1881. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 83-93.

 

page 607, Village Weaver Ploceus cucullatus

Revise the range of subspecies Ploceus cucullatus cucullatus from “Mauretania to Chad, south to n Gabon and nw Zaire; Bioko” to “Mauritania east to Chad, and south through west Africa to Bioko, northern Gabon and northwestern Zaire”.

 

GROUPS

 

GROUPS – newly created groups

 

Takahe (North Island) Porphyrio mantelli mantelli

Takahe (South Island) Porphyrio mantelli hochstetteri

Tristan Moorhen (Tristan) Gallinula nesiotis nesiotis

Tristan Moorhen (Gough) Gallinula nesiotis comeri

Slender-billed Cuckoo-Dove (Pale-fronted) Macropygia amboinensis albicapilla/sanghirensis

Slender-billed Cuckoo-Dove (Rusty-fronted) Macropygia amboinensis [amboinensis Group]

Green Imperial-Pigeon (Maroon-naped) Ducula aenea nuchalis

Green Imperial-Pigeon (Rufous-naped) Ducula aenea paulina

Red-knobbed Imperial-Pigeon (Pink-necked) Ducula rubricera rubricera

Red-knobbed Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-necked) Ducula rubricera rufigula

Spice Imperial-Pigeon (Pink-naped) Ducula myristicivora myristicivora

Spice Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-naped) Ducula myristicivora geelvinkiana

Cinnamon-bellied Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-naped) Ducula basilica basilica

Cinnamon-bellied Imperial-Pigeon (Golden-naped) Ducula basilica obiensis

Rufescent Imperial-Pigeon (Purple-rumped) Ducula chalconota chalconota

Rufescent Imperial-Pigeon (Green-rumped) Ducula chalconota smaragdina

Pinon Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-headed) Ducula pinon [pinon Group]

Pinon Imperial-Pigeon (Pink-headed) Ducula pinon salvadorii

Dark-backed Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-headed) Ducula lacernulata lacernulata

Dark-backed Imperial-Pigeon (Pink-headed) Ducula lacernulata williami

Dark-backed Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-crowned) Ducula lacernulata sasakensis

Greater Coucal (Greater) Centropus sinensis [sinensis Group]

Greater Coucal (Southern) Centropus sinensis parroti

Great Lizard-Cuckoo (Bahama) Coccyzus merlini bahamensis

Great Lizard-Cuckoo (Cuban) Coccyzus merlini [merlini Group]

Lesser Masked-Owl (Buru) Tyto sororcula cayelii

Lesser Masked-Owl (Tanimbar) Tyto sororcula sororcula

Sunda Scops-Owl (Sunda) Otus lempiji [lempiji Group]

Sunda Scops-Owl (Singapore) Otus lempiji cnephaeus

Moluccan Scops-Owl (Moluccan) Otus magicus [magicus Group]

Moluccan Scops-Owl (Wetar) Otus magicus tempestatis

Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Kalidupa) Otus manadensis kalidupae

Koepcke’s Screech-Owl (Koepcke’s) Megascops koepckeae koepckeae

Koepcke’s Screech-Owl (Apurimac) Megascops koepckeae hockingi

Boreal Owl (Tengmalm’s) Aegolius funereus [funereus Group]

Boreal Owl (Richardson’s) Aegolius funereus richardsoni

Barred Owlet-Nightjar (Barred) Aegotheles bennettii bennettii/wiedenfeldi

Barred Owlet-Nightjar (Dwarf) Aegotheles bennettii plumifer

Himalayan Swiftlet (Himalayan) Aerodramus brevirostris brevirostris/innominatus

Himalayan Swiftlet (Indochinese) Aerodramus brevirostris rogersi

African Swift (Fernando Po) Apus barbatus sladeniae

African Swift (African) Apus barbatus [barbatus Group]

Philippine Dwarf-Kingfisher (Luzon) Ceyx melanurus melanurus

Philippine Dwarf-Kingfisher (Samar) Ceyx melanurus samarensis

Philippine Dwarf-Kingfisher (Mindanao) Ceyx melanurus mindanensis

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Dimorphic) Ceyx lepidus margarethae

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Sula) Ceyx lepidus wallacii

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (North Moluccan) Ceyx lepidus uropygialis

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Seram) Ceyx lepidus lepidus

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Buru) Ceyx lepidus cajeli

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (New Guinea) Ceyx lepidus solitarius

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Manus) Ceyx lepidus dispar

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (New Ireland) Ceyx lepidus mulcatus

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (New Britain) Ceyx lepidus sacerdotis

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Bougainville) Ceyx lepidus pallidus

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (New Georgia) Ceyx lepidus collectoris

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (North Solomons) Ceyx lepidus meeki

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Malaita) Ceyx lepidus malaitae

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Guadalcanal) Ceyx lepidus nigromaxilla

Variable Dwarf-Kingfisher (Makira) Ceyx lepidus gentianus

Striolated Puffbird (Natterer’s) Nystalus striolatus striolatus

Striolated Puffbird (Eastern) Nystalus striolatus torridus

Scarlet-banded Barbet (Scarlet-banded) Capito wallacei wallacei

Scarlet-banded Barbet (Sira) Capito wallacei fitzpatricki

American Kestrel (Southeastern) Falco sparverius paulus

Orange-breasted Fig-Parrot (Dusky-cheeked) Cyclopsitta gulielmitertii [melanogenia Group]

Orange-breasted Fig-Parrot (Orange-breasted) Cyclopsitta gulielmitertii gulielmitertii

Orange-breasted Fig-Parrot (Black-fronted) Cyclopsitta gulielmitertii [nigrifrons Group]

Painted Parakeet (Venezuelan) Pyrrhura picta emma/auricularis

Santarem Parakeet (Cristalino) Pyrrhura amazonum lucida

Rose-fronted Parakeet (Garlepp’s) Pyrrhura roseifrons parvifrons

Stipple-throated Antwren (Negro) Epinecrophylla haematonota pyrrhonota

Stipple-throated Antwren (Napo) Epinecrophylla haematonota haematonota

Stipple-throated Antwren (Madeira) Epinecrophylla haematonota amazonica

Ihering’s Antwren (Purus) Myrmotherula iheringi heteroptera

Ihering’s Antwren (Ihering’s) Myrmotherula iheringi iheringi

Xingu Scale-backed Antbird (Xingu) Willisornis vidua vidua

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Napo) Dendrocolaptes certhia radiolatus

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Amazonian) Dendrocolaptes certhia certhia

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Jurua) Dendrocolaptes certhia juruanus/polyzonus

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Plain-colored) Dendrocolaptes certhia concolor

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Ridgway’s) Dendrocolaptes certhia ridgwayi

Amazonian Barred-Woodcreeper (Todd’s) Dendrocolaptes certhia medius

Curve-billed Scythebill (Zimmer’s) Campylorhamphus procurvoides sanus

Curve-billed Scythebill (Curve-billed) Campylorhamphus procurvoides procurvoides

Curve-billed Scythebill (Rondonia) Campylorhamphus procurvoides probatus

Curve-billed Scythebill (Snethlage’s) Campylorhamphus procurvoides multostriatus

Lineated Woodcreeper (Lineated) Lepidocolaptes albolineatus albolineatus

Lineated Woodcreeper (Duida) Lepidocolaptes albolineatus duidae

Lineated Woodcreeper (Rondonia) Lepidocolaptes albolineatus fuscicapillus

Lineated Woodcreeper (Layard’s) Lepidocolaptes albolineatus layardi

Long-tailed Cinclodes (Cipo) Cinclodes pabsti espinhacensis

Long-tailed Cinclodes (Long-tailed) Cinclodes pabsti pabsti

Olive-backed Foliage-gleaner (Olive-backed) Automolus infuscatus infuscatus/purusianus

Olive-backed Foliage-gleaner (Olive-capped) Automolus infuscatus cervicalis/badius

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Rusty) Automolus rubiginosus [rubiginosus Group]

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Black-tailed) Automolus rubiginosus [nigricauda Group]

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Cinnamon-throated) Automolus rubiginosus cinnamomeigula

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Dusky) Automolus rubiginosus [obscurus Group]

Ruddy Foliage-gleaner (Watkins’s) Automolus rubiginosus watkinsi

Paltry Tyrannulet (Venezuelan) Zimmerius vilissimus petersi

Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye (West African) Platysteira concreta concreta

Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye (Angolan) Platysteira concreta ansorgei

Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye (Central African) Platysteira concreta graueri

Yellow-bellied Wattle-eye (Kungwe) Platysteira concreta kungwensis

White-vented Whistler (Sulu) Pachycephala homeyeri homeyeri

White-vented Whistler (Cebu) Pachycephala homeyeri major

White-vented Whistler (White-vented) Pachycephala homeyeri winchelli

Southern Fiscal (Uhehe) Lanius collaris marwitzi

Southern Fiscal (Fiscal) Lanius collaris [collaris Group]

Variable Pitohui (Northern) Pitohui kirhocephalus [kirhocephalus Group]

Variable Pitohui (Southern) Pitohui kirhocephalus [uropygialis Group]

Variable Pitohui (Raja Ampat) Pitohui kirhocephalus cervineiventris/pallidus

Cockerell’s Fantail (White-winged) Rhipidura cockerelli [cockerelli Group]

Cockerell’s Fantail (Dot-breasted) Rhipidura cockerelli lavellae

Cockerell’s Fantail (Black-breasted) Rhipidura cockerelli albina

Cockerell’s Fantail (Spot-breasted) Rhipidura cockerelli coultasi

Northern Fantail (Gray-backed) Rhipidura rufiventris obiensis

Northern Fantail (Rusty-bellied) Rhipidura rufiventris bouruensis

Northern Fantail (Plain) Rhipidura rufiventris [gularis Group]

Northern Fantail (Speckle-throated) Rhipidura rufiventris tenkatei

Northern Fantail (Cream-bellied) Rhipidura rufiventris [rufiventris Group]

Northern Fantail (Slaty) Rhipidura rufiventris vidua/kordensis

Northern Fantail (Chin-spot) Rhipidura rufiventris nigromentalis

Northern Fantail (Melanesian) Rhipidura rufiventris [setosa Group]

Rufous Fantail (Moluccan) Rhipidura rufifrons torrida

Rufous Fantail (Gray-tailed) Rhipidura rufifrons louisiadensis

Rufous Fantail (Guam) Rhipidura rufifrons uraniae

Rufous Fantail (Marianas) Rhipidura rufifrons saipanensis/mariae

Rufous Fantail (Yap) Rhipidura rufifrons versicolor

Rufous Fantail (White-fronted) Rhipidura rufifrons melaenolaema/utupuae

Rufous Fantail (Brown-capped) Rhipidura rufifrons agilis

Rufous Fantail (Brown-backed) Rhipidura rufifrons [rufofronta Group]

Rufous Fantail (Rufous-backed) Rhipidura rufifrons russata/kuperi

Rufous Fantail (Dark-throated) Rhipidura rufifrons ugiensis

Rufous Fantail (Rufous-fronted) Rhipidura rufifrons rufifrons/intermedia

Gray Fantail (Melanesian) Rhipidura albiscapa [pelzelni Group]

Gray Fantail (Australian) Rhipidura albiscapa [albiscapa Group]

Azure-winged Magpie (Japanese) Cyanopica cyanus japonica split from Azure-winged Magpie (Asian)

White-winged Magpie (Black-tailed) Urocissa whiteheadi xanthomelana

White-winged Magpie (Gray-tailed) Urocissa whiteheadi whiteheadi

Common Green-Magpie (Common) Cissa chinensis [chinensis Group]

Common Green-Magpie (Yellow-crowned) Cissa chinensis margaritae

Coal Tit (British) Periparus ater britannicus/hibernicus

Coal Tit (Continental) Periparus ater [ater Group]

Coal Tit (Atlas) Periparus ater ledouci/atlas

Coal Tit (Cyprus) Periparus ater cypriotes

Coal Tit (Caucasus) Periparus ater [phaeonotus Group]

Coal Tit (Himalayan) Periparus ater aemodius/rufipectus

Coal Tit (Chinese) Periparus ater ptilosus/kuatunensis

Azure Tit (Azure) Cyanistes cyanus [cyanus Group]

Azure Tit (Yellow-breasted) Cyanistes cyanus [flavipectus Group]

House Wren (Dominica) Troglodytes aedon rufescens

House Wren (Martinique) Troglodytes aedon martinicensis

House Wren (St. Lucia) Troglodytes aedon mesoleucus

House Wren (Guadeloupe) Troglodytes aedon guadeloupensis

House Wren (St. Vincent) Troglodytes aedon musicus

House Wren (Grenada) Troglodytes aedon grenadensis

Marsh Wren (Worthington’s) Cistothorus palustris griseus

Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Clamorous) Acrocephalus stentoreus stentoreus/levantinus

Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler (Mrs. Moreau’s) Scepomycter winifredae winifredae

Mrs. Moreau’s Warbler (Rubeho) Scepomycter winifredae rubehoensis

Wailing Cisticola (Lyne’s) Cisticola lais distinctus

Wailing Cisticola (Wailing) Cisticola lais [lais Group]

African Hill Babbler (African) Sylvia abyssinica [abyssinica Group]

African Hill Babbler (Ruwenzori) Sylvia abyssinica atriceps

Black-throated Parrotbill (Black-throated) Suthora nipalensis nipalensis/crocotius

Black-throated Parrotbill (Orange-eared) Suthora nipalensis humii

Black-throated Parrotbill (Gray-breasted) Suthora nipalensis poliotis/feae

Black-throated Parrotbill (Buff-breasted) Suthora nipalensis ripponi/patriciae

Black-throated Parrotbill (Black-eared) Suthora nipalensis beaulieu/kamoli

Black-chinned Laughingthrush (Nilgiri) Trochalopteron cachinnans jerdoni

Black-chinned Laughingthrush (Brahmagiri) Trochalopteron cachinnans cachinnans

Kerala Laughingthrush (Central Kerala) Trochalopteron fairbanki fairbanki

Kerala Laughingthrush (South Kerala) Trochalopteron fairbanki meridionale

Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher (Mangrove) Cyornis rufigastra [rufigastra Group]

Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher (Philippine) Cyornis rufigastra [blythi Group]

Forest Robin (Olive-backed) Stiphrornis erythrothorax pyrrholaemus

Black-eared Wheatear (Western) Oenanthe hispanica hispanica

Black-eared Wheatear (Eastern) Oenanthe hispanica melanoleuca

Crimson Sunbird (Goulpourah) Aethopyga siparaja [seheriae Group]

Crimson Sunbird (Crimson) Aethopyga siparaja [siparaja Group]

Crimson Sunbird (Sulawesi) Aethopyga siparaja flavostriata/beccarii

Eastern Yellow Wagtail (Eastern) Motacilla tschutschensis tschutschensis/plexa

Bell’s Sparrow (Mojave) Artemisiospiza belli canescens

Song Sparrow (Aleutian) Melospiza melodia sanaka/maxima

Song Sparrow (Interior West) Melospiza melodia montana/merrilli

Song Sparrow (San Pablo Saltmarsh) Melospiza melodia samuelis

Song Sparrow (South San Francisco Bay Saltmarsh) Melospiza melodia pusillula

Red Crossbill (Corsican) Loxia curvirostra corsicana

Red Crossbill (Balearic) Loxia curvirostra balearica

Red Crossbill (North African) Loxia curvirostra poliogyna

Red Crossbill (Cyprus) Loxia curvirostra guillemardi

Red Crossbill (Crimean) Loxia curvirostra mariae

Red Crossbill (Altai) Loxia curvirostra altaiensis

Red Crossbill (Tien Shan) Loxia curvirostra tianschanica

Red Crossbill (Himalayan) Loxia curvirostra himalayensis

Red Crossbill (Da Lat) Loxia curvirostra meridionalis

Red Crossbill (Japanese) Loxia curvirostra japonica

Red Crossbill (Luzon) Loxia curvirostra luzoniensis

Desert Sparrow (Desert) Passer simplex simplex/saharae

Desert Sparrow (Zarudny’s) Passer simplex zarudnyi