Clements Checklist

Updates & Corrections – August 2017

2017 UPDATES and CORRECTIONS, to accompany the eBird/Clements Checklistv2017 spreadsheet
Posted 15 August 2017

The Updates and Corrections are grouped into four sections. Within each section, items are listed in the order in which they are encountered in the eBird/Clements Checklistv2017 spreadsheet, although we also continue to reference by page number the relevant entry in the last published edition of the Clements Checklist (6th, 2007).

The four sections are

Species – gains and losses   (posted 17 August 2017)

Orders and Families – gains, losses, and changes to order or family composition or nomenclature  (posted 17 August 2017)

Standard Updates and Correction – all other changes, listed in sequence as they occur in the spreadsheet (posted 18 July 2018)

Groups – a list of new groups  (posted 17 August 2017)

SPECIES

SPECIES GAINS (splits and newly recognized species)

 page 69, Gray-breasted Partridge  Arborophila orientalis

Gray-breasted Partrige Arborophila orientalis is split into four monotypic species, following Mees (1996): Malaysian Partridge Arborophila campbelli; Roll’s Partridge Arborophila rolli; Sumatran Partridge Arborophila sumatrana; and Gray-breasted Partridge Arborophila orientalis.

Reference:

Mees, G.F. 1996. Geographical variation in birds of Java. Publications of the Nuttall Ornithological Club number 26. Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 39, Northern Harrier  Circus cyaneus

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Northern Harrier Circus cyaneus is split into two monotypic species: Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus, of the Old World, and Northern Harrier Circus hudsonius, of North America. This split is based on “differences in morphology, plumage, and breeding habitat (Grant 1983, Thorpe 1988, Dobson and Clarke 2011, Etherington and Mobley 2016) commensurate with differences between other recognized species of Circus” (Chesser et al. 2017).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Dobson, A.D.M., and M.L. Clarke. 2011. Inconsistency in the taxonomy of Hen and Northern harriers: causes and consequences. British Birds 104: 192–201.

Etherington, G.J., and J.A. Mobley. 2016. Molecular phylogeny, morphology and life-history comparisons within Circus cyaneus reveal the presence of two distinct evolutionary lineages. Avian Research 7: 17.

Grant, P.J. 1983. The ‘Marsh Hawk’ problem. British Birds 76: 373–376.

Thorpe, J.P. 1988. Juvenile Hen Harriers showing ‘Marsh Hawk” characters. British Birds 81: 377–382.

 

page (addition 2017), Tanna Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas ferrugineus

The validity of Tanna Ground-Dove Alopecoenas ferrugineus formerly was questioned (Peters 1937), but this species now is widely accepted (Stresemann 1950, Greenway 1958, Dutson 2011). Insert this species, with range “Formerly Tanna Island (Vanuatu). Extinct; not reported since 1774”, immediately following Thick-billed Ground-Dove Alopecoenas salamonis.

References:

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarcks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

Greenway, J.C., Jr. 1958. Extinct and vanishing birds of the world. Special Publication number 13. American Committee for International Wild Life Protection, New York, New York.

Peters, J.L. 1937. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume III. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Stresemann, E. 1950. Birds collected during Capt. James Cook’s last expedition (1776-1780). Auk 67: 66-88.

 

page (addition 2017), Norfolk Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas norfolkensis

The status of Norfolk Ground-Dove Alopecoenas norfolkensis formerly was confused (Peters 1937), but this species now is widely accepted as valid (Goodwin 1970, Gill et al. 2010, Forshaw 2015). Insert this species, with range “Formerly Norfolk Island (Australia). Extinct since ca 1800”, immediately following White-throated Ground-Dove Alopecoenas xanthonurus.

References:

Forshaw, J.M. 2015. Pigeons and doves in Australia. CSIRO Publishing, Clayton South, Victoria, Australia.

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

Goodwin, D. 1970. Pigeons and doves of the world. Second edition. British Museum (Natural History), London and Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

Peters, J.L. 1937. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume III. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 185, Glossy Swiftlet  Collocalia esculenta

Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta is split into multiple species, and the sequence of species of Collocalia swiftlets is revised. following Rheindt et al. (2017):

Subspecies Collocalia esculenta natalis is elevated to species rank as a monotypic Christmas Island Swiftlet Collocalia natalis.

Subspecies affinis, elachyptera, cyanoptila, vanderbilti, and oberholseri are removed from Glossy Swiftlet and are recognized as Plume-toed Swiftlet Collocalia affinis.

Subspecies marginata and septentrionalis are removed from Glossy Swiftlet and are recognized as Gray-rumped Swiftlet Collocalia marginata.

Subspecies isonota and bagobo are removed from Glossy Swiftlet, and are recognized as Ridgetop Swiftlet Collocalia isonota.

We recognize Tenggara Swiftlet Collocalia sumbawae, which includes subspecies sumbawae and a newly described subspecies, sumbae. Revise the range description of nominate sumbawae from “W Lesser Sundas (Sumbawa, Sumba, Flores and Besar)” to “western Lesser Sundas (Sumbawa; population on Flores and Besar possibly also this subspecies)”. Following sumbawae, insert newly described sumbae Schodde, Rheindt, and Christidis 2017, with range “western Lesser Sundas (Sumba)”.

Subspecies neglecta and perneglecta are removed from Glossy Swiftlet, and are recognized as Drab Swiftlet Collocalia neglecta. Revise the range description of nominate neglecta from “E Lesser Sundas (Roti, Dao, Semau, Timor and Jaco)” to “Lesser Sundas (Sawu, Roti, Semau, and Timor)”. Revise the range description of subspecies perneglecta from “Alor, Sawu, Wetar, Kisar, Romang, Damar and Tanimbar is.” to “Lesser Sundas (Alor, Wetar, and Kisar); populations on Romang, Damar and Tanimbar possibly introgressant with Glossy Swiftlet”.

Subspecies uropygialis and albidior are removed from Glossy Swiftlet, and are recognized as Satin Swiftlet Collocalia uropygialis.

Additionally, subspecies Collocalia esculenta erwini, with range “High mountains of w New Guinea”, is condidered to be a junior synonym of nitens (Beehler and Pratt 2016, Rheindt et al. 2017), and is deleted. Revise the range description of subspecies nitens from “Lowlands of New Guinea and w Papuan islands” to “New Guinea, western Papuan Islands, Yapen, and Karker”. Following Rheindt et al. (2017), we recognize subspecies heinrothi Neumann 1919, previously considered to be a junior synomym of stresemanni (Peters 1940). Insert heinrothi immediately following subspecies stresemanni; the range of heinrothi is “Bismarck Archipelago (New Hanover, Nusa, New Ireland, and Djaul)”. Subspecies kalili, with range “Bismarck Arch. (New Ireland, New Hanover and Dyaul)”, is considered to be a junior synomym of heinrothi (Dickinson and Remsen 2013, Rheindt et al. 2017), and is deleted. Following subspecies tametamele, insert a newly described subspecies, lagonoleucos Schodde, Rheindt, and Christidis 2017, with range “northwestern Solomon Islands (Buka and Bougainville; identify of population on Shortland not determined, but possibly this subspecies)” (Rheindt et al. 2017). Revise the range description of nominate esculenta from “S Moluccas, s Sulawesi, Banggai and Sula islands” to “central and southern Sulawesi, Banggai and Sula islands, South Moluccas  (to Kai Islands), and Aru Islands”. As a result of all of these changes, Glossy Swiftlet now consists of the following subspecies: spilura, manadensis, esculenta, minuta, amethystina, numforensis, nitens, misimae, stresemanni, heinrothi, spilogaster, hypogrammica, tametamele, lagonoleucos, becki, makirensis, and desiderata.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Peters, J.L. 1940. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume IV. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Rheindt, F.E., L. Christidis, J.A. Norman, J.A. Eaton, K.R. Sadanandan, and R. Schodde. 2017. Speciation in Indo-Pacific swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae): integrating molecular and phenotypic data for a new provisional taxonomy of the Collocalia esculenta complex. Zootaxa 4250: 401-433.

 

page 204, Magnificent Hummingbird  Eugenes fulgens

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Magnificent Hummingbird Eugenes fulgens is split into two species: Rivoli’s Hummingbird Eugenes fulgens, and Talamanca Hummingbird Eugenes spectabilis. This action is based on an assessment of the degree of plumage differences between them. A phylogenetic survey by Zamudio-Beltrán and Hernández-Baños (2015) also revealed a genetic divergence between Rivoli’s and Talamanca hummingbirds.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Zamudio-Beltrán, L.E., and B.E. Hernández-Baños. 2015. A multilocus analysis provides evidence for more than one species within Eugenes fulgens (Aves: Trochilidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 90: 80-84.

 

page 240, Emerald Toucanet  Aulacorhynchus prasinus

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Emerald Toucanet Aulacorhynchus prasinus is split into two species: Northern Emerald-Toucanet Aulacorhynchus prasinus, which includes subspecies wagleri, prasinus, warneri, virescens, volcanius, maxillaris, caeruleogularis, and cognatus; and Southern Emerald-Toucanet Aulacorhynchus albivitta, which includes subspecies lautus, griseigularis, albivitta, phaeolaemus, dimidiatus, and cyanolaemus. This split is based on “differences in phenotype and genetic results consistent with those differences (Puebla-Olivares et al. 2008, Bonaccorso et al. 2011, Winker 2016)” (Chesser et al. 2017).

Within Northern Emerald-Toucanet, change the English name of the monotypic group Aulacorhynchus prasinus wagleri from Emerald Toucanet (Wagler’s) to Northern Emerald-Toucanet (Wagler’s). Change the English name of the polytypic group Aulacorhynchus prasinus [prasinus Group] from Emerald Toucanet (Emerald) to Northern Emerald-Toucanet (Emerald). Subspecies stenorhabdus, with range “Subtropical s Mexico to w Guatemala and n El Salvador”, and subspecies chiapensis, with range “Mts. of extreme s Mexico (Mt. Ovando, Chiapas)”, both are considered to be junior synonyms of virescens (Peters 1948, Monroe 1968), and are deleted. Revise the range description of virescens from “SE Mexico (Chiapas) to Honduras and Nicaragua” to “southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, western El Salvador, Honduras, and northern Nicaragua”. Change the English name of the polytypic group Aulacorhynchus prasinus caeruleogularis/maxillaris from Emerald Toucanet (Blue-throated) to Northern Emerald-Toucanet (Blue-throated). Change the English name of the monotypic group Aulacorhynchus prasinus cognatus from Emerald Toucanet (Violet-throated) to Northern Emerald-Toucanet (Violet-throated).

Within Southern Emerald-Toucanet, change the names of the monotypic group Emerald Toucanet (Santa Marta) Aulacorhynchus prasinus lautus to Southern Emerald-Toucanet (Santa Marta) Aulacorhynchus albivitta lautus. Change the names of the monotypic group Emerald Toucanet (Gray-throated) Aulacorhynchus prasinus griseigularis to Southern Emerald-Toucanet (Gray-throated) Aulacorhynchus albivitta griseigularis. Change the names of the polytypic group Emerald Toucanet (Andean) Aulacorhynchus prasinus albivitta/phaeolaemus to Southern Emerald-Toucanet (Andean) Aulacorhynchus albivitta albivitta/phaeolaemus. Change the names of the polytypic group Emerald Toucanet (Black-throated) Aulacorhynchus prasinus [atrogularis Group] to Southern Emerald-Toucanet (Black-throated) Aulacorhynchus albivitta [atrogularis Group].

References:

Bonaccorso, E., J.M. Guayasamin, A.T. Peterson, and A.G. Navarro-Sigüenza. 2011. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of Neotropical toucanets in the genus Aulacorhynchus (Aves, Ramphastidae). Zoologica Scripta 40: 336-349.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Monroe, B.L., Jr. 1968. A distributional survey of the birds of Honduras. Ornithological Monographs number 7. American Ornithologists’ Union.

Peters, J.L. 1948. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume VI. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Puebla-Olivares, F., E. Bonaccorso, A. Espinosa de los Monteros, K.E. Omland, J.E. Llorente-Bousquets, A.T. Peterson, and A.G. Navarro-Sigüenza. 2008. Speciation in the Emerald Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus prasinus) complex. Auk 125: 39-50.

Winker, K. 2016. An examination of species limits in the Aulacorhynchusprasinus” toucanet complex (Aves: Ramphastidae). PeerJ 4: e2381.

 

page 135, Horned Parakeet  Eunymphicus cornutus

Each of the two monotypic groups of Horned Parakeet is recognized as a separate species, following Juniper and Parr (1998) and Boon et al. (2014): Horned Parakeet (Horned) Eunymphicus cornutus cornutus becomes Horned Parakeet Eunymphicus cornutus, and Horned Parakeet (Ouvea) Eunymphicus cornutus uvaeensis becomes Ouvea Parakeet Eunymphicus uvaeensis.

References:

Boon, W.-M., O. Robinet, N. Rawlence, V. Bretagnolle, J.A. Norman, L. Christidis, and G.K. Chambers. 2008. Morphological, behavioural, and genetic differentiation within the Horned Parakeet (Eunymphicus cornutus) and its affinities to Cyanoramphus and Prosopeia. Emu 108: 251-260.

Juniper, T., and M. Parr. 1998. Parrots: a guide to parrots of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

page (addition 2017), Tatama Tapaculo  Scytalopus alvarezlopezi

We add a new species, the recently described Tatama Tapaculo Scytalopus alvarezlopezi (Stiles et al. 2017), with range “Pacific slope of Colombian Andes (western Antioquia south to southwestern Valle del Cauca)”. Position Tatama Tapaculo to immediately follow Ecuadorian Tapaculo Scytalopus robbinsi. Tatama Tapaculo is the species that long has been known to birders as “Alto Pisones Tapaculo”; Alto de Pisones is a site at the edge of Tamatá National Park. Please note that the validity of this new species has not yet been reviewed by AOS-SACC.

Reference:

Stiles, F.G., O. Laverde-R., and C.D. Cadena. 2017. A new species of tapaculo (Rhinocryptidae: Scytalopus) from the Western Andes of Colombia. Auk 134: 377-392.

 

page 558, Cardinal Myzomela  Myzomela cardinalis

The monotypic group Cardinal Myzomela (Samoan) Myzomela cardinalis nigriventris is elevated to species rank as Samoan Myzomela Myzomela nigriventris, following Pratt and Mittermeier (2016).

Reference:

Pratt, H.D., and J.C. Mittermeier. 2016. Notes on the natural history, taxonomy, and conservation of the endemic avifaua of the Samoan Archipelago. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 128: 217-241.

 

page 571, Northern Shrike  Lanius excubitor

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Northern Shrike Lanius excubitor is split into two species: Great Gray Shrike Lanius excubitor, with subspecies excubitor, homeyeri, and leucopterus; and Northern Shrike Lanius borealis, with subspecies sibiricus, bianchii, mollis, funereus, and borealis. This split is based on “differences in plumage and mtDNA (Johnsen et al. 2010, Olsson et al. 2010, Peer et al. 2011)” (Chesser et al. 2017); in particular, Northern Shrike is more closely related to other species than it is to Great Gray Shrike (Olsson et al. 2010).

Change the the scientific name of the polytypic group Northern Shrike (Asian) from Lanius excubitor [mollis Group] to Lanius borealis [mollis Group].

     Subspecies invictus, with range “N Alaska to extreme n British Columbia and Alberta”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate borealis (Phillips 1986), and is deleted. Revise the range description of borealis from “E Canada (Quebec and n Ontario); > to ne US” to “breeds Alaska and northern Canada, south to extreme northern British Columbia and Alberta, northern Ontario, and Quebec; winters southern Canada and northern United States.”. Consequently, the group Northern Shrike (American) becomes monotypic; change the scientific name of this group from Lanius excubitor borealis/invictus to Lanius borealis borealis.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Johnsen, A., E. Rindal, P.G.P. Ericson, D. Zuccon, K.C.R. Kerr, M.Y. Stoeckle, and J.T. Lifjeld. 2010. DNA barcoding of Scandinavian birds reveals divergent lineages in trans-Atlantic species. Journal of Ornithology 151: 565–578.

Olsson, U., P. Alström, L. Svensson, M. Aliabadian, and P. Sundberg. 2010. The Lanius excubitor (Aves, Passeriformes) conundrum—taxonomic dilemma when molecular and non-molecular data tell different stories. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 347–357.

Peer, B.D., C.E. McIntosh, M.J. Kuehn, S.I. Rothstein, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Complex biogeographic history of Lanius shrikes and its implications for the evolution of defenses against avian brood parasitism. Condor 113: 385–394.

 

page 700, Piopio  Turnagra capensis

The extinct genus Turnagra, which we previously treated as a single, monotypic species, Piopio Turnagra capensis, is split into two species, following Oliver (1955), Holdaway et al. (2001), and Gill et al. (2010): a monotypic North Island Piopio Turnagra tanagra, with range “Formerly New Zealand (North Island). Extinct; last confirmed report in 1902”; and a polytypic South Island Piopio Turnagra capensis, with subspecies minor and capensis.

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, Turnagra capensis minor, with range “Formerly New Zealand (Stephens Island). Extinct; last reported 1897” (Gill et al. 2010).

With the split of Turnagra into two species, and the addition of subspecies minor, revise the range description of nominate capensis from “Formerly New Zealand. Extinct; last reported 1963” to “Formerly New Zealand (South Island). Extinct; last confirmed report in 1905”.

References:

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

Holdaway, R.N., T.H. Worthy, and A.J.D. Tennyson. 2001. A working list of breeding bird species of the New Zealand region at first human contact. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 28:

119-187.

Oliver, W.R.B. 1955. New Zealand birds. A.H. & A.W. Reed, Wellington, New Zealand.

 

page 479, Silktail  Lamprolia victoriae

Silktail Lamprolia victoriae is split into monotypic species, following Andersen et al. (2015b, 2017): Taveuni Silktail Lamprolia victoriae, and Natewa Silktail Lamprolia klinesmithi.

References:

Andersen, M.J., P.A. Hosner, C.E Filardi, and R.G. Moyle. 2015b. Phylogeny of the monarch flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly and novel relationships within a major Australo-Pacific radiation. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 67: 336–347.

Andersen, M.J., J.D. Manthey, A. Naikatini, and R.G. Moyle. 2017. Conservation genomics of the silktail (Aves: Lamprolia victoriae) suggests the need for increased protection of native forest on the Natewa Peninsula, Fiji. Conservation Genetics in press: doi:10.1007/s10592-017-0979-x.

 

page 584, Superb Bird-of-Paradise  Lophorina superba

Superb Bird-of-Paradise is split into three species, following Irestedt et al. (2017). Confusingly, the name superba also is transferred from one population to another (Irestedt et al. 2017). The resulting species are Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise Lophorina niedda, with subspecies niedda and the newly described subspecies inopinata; Greater Superb Bird-of-Paradise Lophorina superba, with subspecies superba, addenda, and latipennis; and a monotypic Lesser Superb Bird-of-Paradise Lophorina minor.

Under Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise (Lophorina niedda), add a newly described subspecies, Lophorina niedda inopinata Irestedt et al. 2017, with range “mountains of the Bird’s Head Peninsula, West Papua, New Guinea”. Insert this subspecies immediately following the entry for the species Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise Lophorina niedda. Note that the range attributed to this subspecies corresponds to the range formerly attributed to subspecies superba, a name that now is applied to a population in the western highlands of New Guinea, and which represents a different species, Greater Superb Bird-of-Paradise.

Revise the range description of subspecies niedda from “W New Guinea (Mt. Wondiwoi in Wandammen Peninsula)” to “mountains of the Wandammen Peninsula, Bird’s Neck, West Papua, New Guinea”.

Regarding Greater Superb Bird-of-Paradise (Lophorina superba), Irestedt et al. (2017) conclude that the name superba, previously applied to the population in the mountains of the Bird’s Head Peninsula, instead should refer to the population of the central highlands of New Guinea. Also, subspecies feminina, with range “W New Guinea (Weyland Mts. to Hindenberg Mts.)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of superba (Irestedt et al. 2017). Revise the range description of superba from “W New Guinea (Arfak and Tamrau mountains)” to “montane western New Guinea, from the Kobowre Mountains (West Papua, Indonesia) to the Sepik-Strickland River Divide (western Papua New Guinea)”.

Following Irestedt et al. (2017), resurrect subspecies addenda Iredale 1948, previously considered to be a synomym of feminina (Mayr 1962), with range “eastern ranges of New Guinea, from the Yuat-Strickland River Divide and the base of the southeastern Peninsula, Papua New Guinea”. Insert subspecies addenda immediately following subspecies superba.

Revise the range description of subspecies latipennis from “E New Guinea (Central and E Highlands to mts. of Huon Pen.)” to “eastern New Guinea (mountains of the Huon Peninsula, and presumably also the Herzog and Adelbert Ranges)”.

Lesser Superb Bird-of-Paradise (Lophorina minor) is monotypic. Subspecies sphinx, known from a single specimen, with range “Mountains of extreme se New Guinea”, is considered to be a junior synonym of minor (Irestedt et al. 2017), and is deleted. Revise the range description of minor from “Mountains of se Papua New Guinea” to “southeastern Papua New Guinea (mountains of the Papuan Peninsula, west at least to the Wharton Range)”.

References:

Irestedt, M., H. Batalha-Filho, C.S. Roselaar, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and R. Schodde. 2017. Phylogeny, biogeography and taxonomic consequences in a bird-of-paradise species complex, Lophorina-Ptiloris (Aves: Paradisaeidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society in press.

Mayr, E. 1962. Family Paradisaeidae, Birds of Paradise. Pages 181-204 in E. Mayr and J.C. Greenway, Jr. (editors), Check-list of the birds of the world. Volume XV. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 584, Magnificent Riflebird  Ptiloris magnificus

Each of the two groups in Magnifcent Riflebird is recognized as a separate species, following Beehler and Swaby (1991), Beehler and Pratt (2016), and Irestedt et al. (2017): a polytypic Magnificent Riflebird Ptiloris magnificus, including subspecies magnificus and alberti; and a monotypic Growling Riflebird Ptiloris intercedens.

References:

Irestedt, M., H. Batalha-Filho, C.S. Roselaar, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and R. Schodde. 2017. Phylogeny, biogeography and taxonomic consequences in a bird-of-paradise species complex, Lophorina-Ptiloris (Aves: Paradisaeidae). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society in press.

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Beehler, B.M., and R.J. Swaby. 1991. Phylogeny and biogeography of the Ptiloris riflebirds (Aves: Paradisaeidae). Condor 93: 738-745.

 

page 378, Streak-eared Bulbul  Pycnonotus blanfordi

Streak-eared Bulbul Pycnonotus blanfordi is split into two monotypic species, Ayeyarwady Bulbul Pycnonotus blanfordi, and Streak-eared Bulbul Pycnonotus conradi (Garg et al. 2016). Note that the English name “Streak-eared Bulbul” now is applied to a different scientific name (conradi, not blanfordi).

Reference:

Garg, K.M., R. Tizard, N.S.R. Ng, E. Cros, A. Dejtaradol, B. Chattopadhyay, N. Pwint, M. Päckert, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Genome-wide data help identify an avian species-level lineage that is morphologically and vocally cryptic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 102: 97-103.

 

page 383, Buff-vented Bulbul  Iole olivacea

Buff-vented Bulbul has been listed as a monotypic species, Iole olivacea, since subspecies were introduced to the eBird/Clements Checklist (Clements Checklist fifth edition, 2000). The species name is charlottae (Dickinson and Christidis 2014), not olivacea, however, and the species should have been considered to be polytypic, with subspecies crypta and charlottae (Rand and Deignan 1960, Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Manawatthana et al. (2017) now demonstrate that crypta and charlottae each should be recognized as a separate species. The English name Buff-vented Bulbul remains with Iole crypta. Revise the range description of Buff-vented Bulbul from “Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo and adjacent islands” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Bangka and Belitung, Anambas Islands, and Natuna”. The English name of Iole charlottae is Charlotte’s Bulbul. Revise the range description of Charlotte’s Bulbul from “Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo and adjacent islands” to “Borneo”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Manawatthana, S., P. Laosinchai, N. Onparn, W.Y. Brockleman, and P.D. Round. 2017. Phylogeography of bulbuls in the genus Iole (Aves: Pycnonotidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 120: 931-944.

Rand, A.L., and H.G. Deignan. 1960. Family Pycnonotidae. Pages 221-300 in E. Mayr and J.C. Greenway, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume IX. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 383, Olive Bulbul  Iole virescens

Olive Bulbul Iole virescens is split into two species, following Manawatthana et al. (2017): a monotypic Cachar Bulbul Iole cacharensis; and Olive Bulbul Iole viridescens. Revise the range of Cachar Bulbul from “northeastern India (Assam); population in eastern Bangladesh possibly also this subspecies (or is nominate virescens?)” to “northeastern India (Assam) and eastern Bangladesh”.

Olive Bulbul contains three subspecies: viridescens, and two subspecies that previously were classified under Gray-eyed Bulbul (Iole propinqua), lekhakuni and cinnamomeoventris.

Reference:

Manawatthana, S., P. Laosinchai, N. Onparn, W.Y. Brockleman, and P.D. Round. 2017. Phylogeography of bulbuls in the genus Iole (Aves: Pycnonotidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 120: 931-944.

 

page 555, Gray-brown White-eye  Zosterops cinereus

Gray-brown White-eye Zosterops cinereus is split into two species, following Hayes et al. (2016): Pohnpei White-eye Zosterops ponapensis, and Kosrae White-eye Zosterops cinereus.

Reference:

Hayes, F.E., H.D. Pratt, and C.J. Cianchini. 2016. The avifauna of Kosrae, Micronesia: history, status, and taxonomy. Pacific Science 70: 91–127.

 

page 491, Black-chinned Laughingthrush  Trochalopteron cachinnans

Black-chinned Laughingthrush Trochalopteron cachinnans does not belong in the genus Trochalopteron, but instead is placed in the newly described genus Montecincla (Robin et al. 2017). Position Montecincla immediately following Red-tailed Laughingthrush Trochalopteron milnei. Each of the two monotypic groups of Black-chinned Laughingthrush is elevated to species rank (Praveen and Nameer 2012, Robin et al. 2017): Black-chinned Laughingthrush (Banasura) Trochalopteron cachinnans jerdoni becomes Banasura Laughingthrush Montecincla jerdoni; and Black-chinned Laughingthrush (Nilgiri) Trochalopteron cachinnans cachinnans becomes Nilgiri Laughingthrush Montecincla cachinnans.

References:

Praveen, J., and P.O. Nameer. 2012. Strophocincla laughingthrushes of south India: a case for allopatric speciation and impact on their conservation. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 109: 46-52.

Robin, V.V., C.K. Vishnudas, P. Gupta, F.E. Rheindt, D.H. Hooper, U. Ramakrishnan, and S. Reddy. 2017. Two new genera of songbirds represent endemic radiations from the Shola Sky Islands of the Western Ghats, India. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 31.

 

page 491, Kerala Laughingthrush  Trochalopteron fairbanki

Kerala Laughingthrush Trochalopteron fairbanki does not belong in the genus Trochalopteron, but instead is placed in the newly described genus Montecincla (Robin et al. 2017). Position Montecincla immediately following Red-tailed Laughingthrush Trochalopteron milnei. Each of the two monotypic groups of Kerala Laughingthrush is elevated to species rank (Praveen and Nameer 2012, Robin et al. 2017): Kerala Laughingthrush (Palani) Trochalopteron fairbanki fairbanki becomes Palani Laughingthrush Montecincla fairbanki; and Kerala Laughingthrush (Travancore) Trochalopteron fairbanki meridionale becomes Ashambu Laughingthrush Montecincla meridionale.

References:

Praveen, J., and P.O. Nameer. 2012. Strophocincla laughingthrushes of south India: a case for allopatric speciation and impact on their conservation. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 109: 46-52.

Robin, V.V., C.K. Vishnudas, P. Gupta, F.E. Rheindt, D.H. Hooper, U. Ramakrishnan, and S. Reddy. 2017. Two new genera of songbirds represent endemic radiations from the Shola Sky Islands of the Western Ghats, India. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 31.

 

page 453, Blue-throated Flycatcher  Cyornis rubeculoides

The monotypic group Blue-throated Flycatcher (Chinese) Cyornis rubeculoides glaucicomans is elevated to species rank as Chinese Blue Flycatcher Cyornis glaucicomans (Zhang et al. 2015). Revise the range description from “S China (Sichuan, Guizhou, w Hubei and Shaanxi)” to “breeds southern China (southern Shaanxi and western Hubei to Sichuan and Guizhou); winters southwestern Thailand and the Thai-Malay Peninsula”.

Reference:

Zhang, Z., X. Wang, Y. Huang, U. Olsson, J. Martinez, P. Alström, and F. Lei. 2015. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 94: 232-241.

 

page 456, White-tailed Rubythroat  Calliope pectoralis

White-tailed Rubythroat Calliope pectoralis is split into two species, based on Liu et al. (2016): a polytypic Himalayan Rubythroat Calliope pectoralis, including subspecies pectoralis, confusa, and ballioni; and a monotypic Chinese Rubythroat Calliope tschebaiewi.

Reference:

Liu, Y., G. Chen, Q. Huang, C. Jia, G. Carey, P. Leader, Y. Li, F. Zou, X. Yang, U. Olsson, and P. Alström. 2016. Species delimitation of the white-tailed rubythroat Calliope pectoralis complex (Aves, Muscicapidae) using an integrative taxonomic approach. Journal of Avian Biology 47: 899-910.

 

page 687, Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch  Geospiza difficilis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 676), Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch Geospiza difficilis is split into three monotypic species, based on Lamicchaney et al. (2015). AOS-SACC has not yet determined English names for these species; provisionally we use the following nomenclature: Vampire Ground-Finch Geospiza septentrionalis; Genovesa Ground-Finch Geospiza acutirostris; and Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch Geospiza difficilis.

Revise the range description of Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch from “Galapagos Islands (Pinta, Fernandina, Isabela, and Santiago Is.)” to “Galapagos Islands (Pinta, Fernandina, and Santiago Islands; formerly also Santa Cruz Island, this population now extinct).”

Reference:

Lamichhaney, S., J. Berglund, M. Sällman Almén, K. Maqbool, M. Grabherr, A. Martinez-Barrio, M. Promerová, C.-J.  Rubin, C. Wang, C., N. Zamani, B.R. Grant, P.R., Grant, M.T. Webster, and L. Andersson. 2015. Evolution of Darwin’s finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing. Nature 518: 371–375.

 

page 687, Large Cactus-Finch  Geospiza conirostris

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 676), Large Cactus-Finch Geospiza conirostris is split into two species, based on Lamicchaney et al. (2015). AOS-SACC has not yet determined English names for these species; provisionally we use the following nomenclature: Española Cactus-Finch Geospiza conirostris, which is monotypic; and Genovesa Cactus-Finch Geospiza propinqua, which includes subspecies propinqua and darwiniNote the change of the spelling of the subspecies name darwinii to the correct original spelling darwini (Rothschild and Hartert 1899).

References:

Lamichhaney, S., J. Berglund, M. Sällman Almén, K. Maqbool, M. Grabherr, A. Martinez-Barrio, M. Promerová, C.-J.  Rubin, C. Wang, C., N. Zamani, B.R. Grant, P.R., Grant, M.T. Webster, and L. Andersson. 2015. Evolution of Darwin’s finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing. Nature 518: 371–375.

Rothschild, W., and E. Hartert. 1899. A review of the ornithology of the Galapagos Islands, with notes on Webster-Harris Expedition. Novitates Zoologicae 6: 85-205.

page 687, Yellow-eyed Junco  Junco phaeonotus

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the monotypic group Yellow-eyed Junco (Baird’s) Junco phaeonotus bairdi is elevated to species rank as Baird’s Junco Junco bairdi. This split is based on “morphology (Miller 1941), vocalizations (Howell and Webb 1995, Pieplow and Francis 2011), and genetics (McCormack et al. 2012, Friis et al. 2016, Milá et al. 2016)” (Chesser et al. 2017).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Friis, G., P. Aleixandre, R. Rodriguez-Estrella, A.G. Navarro-Sigüenza, and B. Milá. 2016. Rapid postglacial diversification and long-term stasis within the songbird genus Junco: phylogeographic and phylogenomic evidence. Molecular Ecology 25: 6175–6195.

Howell, S.N.G., and S. Webb. 1995. A guide to the birds of Mexico and northern Central America. Oxford University Press, New York.

McCormack, J.E., J.M. Maley, S.M. Hird, E.P. Derryberry, G.R. Graves, and R.T. Brumfield. 2012. Next-generation sequencing reveals phylogeographic structure and a species tree for recent bird divergences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 397-406.

Milá, B., P. Aleixandre, S. Alvarez-Nordström, and J. McCormack. 2016. More than meets the eye: lineage diversity and evolutionary history of dark-eyed and yellow-eyed juncos. Pages 179-198 in E.D. Ketterson and J.W. Atwell (editors), Snowbird. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Miller, A.H. 1941. Speciation in the avian genus Junco. University of California Publications in Zoology 44: 173-434.

Pieplow, N.D., and C.D. Francis. 2011. Song differences among subspecies of Yellow-eyed Juncos (Junco phaeonotus). Wilson Journal of Ornithology 123: 464-471.

 

page 680, Prevost’s Ground-Sparrow  Melozone biarcuata

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Prevost’s Ground-Sparrow Melozone biarcuata is split into two species: White-faced Ground-Sparrow Melozone biarcuata, and Cabanis’s Ground-Sparrow Melozone cabanisi. This action is based on Sandoval et al. (2014), who documented vocal differences between these two populations; furthermore, the plumage differences between them are commensurate with differences between other closely related species in the family. Following Sandoval et al. (2014), we also consider subspecies hartwegi, with range “Highlands of s Mexico (Chiapas)”, to be a junior synomym of nominate biarcuata, and this subspecies is deleted. White-faced Ground-Sparrow thus becomes monotypic. Revise the range description of White-faced Ground-Sparrow from “Highlands of Guatemala, El Salvador and w Honduras” to “highlands of southern Mexico (Chiapas) Guatemala, El Salvador, and western Honduras”.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Sandoval, L., P.-P. Bitton, S.M. Doucet, and D.J. Mennill. 2014. Analysis of plumage, morphology, and voice reveals species-level differences between two subspecies of Prevost’s Ground-Sparrow Melozone biarcuata (Prévost and Des Murs) (Aves: Emberizidae). Zootaxa 3895: 103–116.

 

page (addition 2009),  Red Crossbill  Loxia curvirostra

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the recently described monotypic group, Red Crossbill (South Hills or type 9) Loxia curvirostra sinesciuris is elevated to species rank as Cassia Crossbill Loxia sinesciuris. This split is based on evidence for premating reproductive isolation in the face of sympatry with Red Crossbill (Smith and Benkman 2007, Benkman et al. 2009), and on genomic differences (Parchman et al. 2016).

References:

Benkman, C.W., J.W. Smith, P.C. Keenan, T.L. Parchman, and L. Santisteban. 2009. A new species of red crossbill (Fringillidae: Loxia) from Idaho. Condor 111: 169–176.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Parchman, T.L., C.A. Buerkle, V. Soria-Carrasco, and C.W. Benkman. 2016. Genome divergence and diversification within a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Molecular Ecology 25: 5705-5718.

Smith, J.W., and C.W. Benkman. 2007. A coevolutionary arms race causes ecological speciation in crossbills. American Naturalist 169: 455–465.

 

 

SPECIES LOSSES (lumps and other deletions)

 

page 101, Thayer’s Gull  Larus thayeri

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Thayer’s Gull Larus thayeri is lumped with Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides, and becomes Larus glaucoides thayeri. We continue to recognize this taxon as a monotypic group, Iceland Gull (Thayer’s) Larus glaucoides thayeri. This lump is based on “evidence of non-assortative mating between thayeri and kumlieni on Baffin and Southampton islands (Weber 1981, Gaston and Decker 1985, Snell 1989)” (Chesser et al. 2017).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gaston, A.J., and R. Decker. 1985. Interbreeding of Thayer’s Gull, Larus thayeri, and Kumlien’s Gull, Larus glaucoides kumlieni on Southampton Island, Northwest Territories. Canadian Field-Naturalist 99: 257-259.

Snell, R.R. 1989.  Status of Larus gulls at Home Bay, Baffin Island. Colonial Waterbirds 112: 12-23.

Weber, J.W. 1981. The Larus gulls of the Pacific Northwest interior, with taxonomic comments on several forms (Part 1). Continental Birdlife 2: 1-10.

 

page 536, Western Olive Sunbird  Cyanomitra obscura

Western Olive Sunbird Cyanomitra obscura is lumped with Eastern Olive Sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea, following Bowie et al. (2004). The combined species becomes Olive Sunbird Cyanomitra olivacea. The ranges of many subspecies are revised, following Fry and Keith (2000), and the sequence of subspecies within Olive Sunbird is reordered.

Revise the range description of subspecies guineensis from “Guinea-Bissau to Togo” to “Senegal to Togo”. Change the scientific name from Cyanomitra obscura guineensis to Cyanomitra olivacea guineensis.

Revise the range description of subspecies cephaelis from “Ghana to Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, n Angola and Congo Basin” to “Benin to northern Angola and the Congo Basin”. Change the scientific name from Cyanomitra obscura cephaelis to Cyanomitra olivacea cephaelis.

Change the scientific name of subspecies obscura from Cyanomitra obscura obscura to Cyanomitra olivacea obscura.

Revise the range description of subspecies ragazzii from “S Sudan to Uganda, w Kenya, w Tanzania, e Democratic Republic of the Congo and n Zambia” to “southern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia to Uganda, western Kenya, western Tanzania, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Zambia”. Change the scientific name from Cyanomitra obscura ragazzii to Cyanomitra olivacea ragazzii.

Revise the range description of subspecies neglecta from “Highlands of ne Kenya to ne Tanzania” to “central Kenya to northeastern Tanzania”.

Change the scientific name of subspecies granti from Cyanomitra obscura granti to Cyanomitra olivacea granti.

Revise the range description of subspecies sclateri from “Mts. of e Zimbabwe and immediately adjacent Mozambique” to “eastern Zimbabwe and west central Mozambique”. Change the scientific name from Cyanomitra obscura sclateri to Cyanomitra olivacea sclateri.

Revise the range description of subspecies olivacina from “coastal southern Tanzania to southern Mozambique and northeastern South Africa (northeastern KwaZulu-Natal)” to “northeastern South Africa (northeastern KwaZulu-Natal) and southern Mozambique”.

Revise the range description of nominate olivacea from “South Africa (Pondoland to Natal and s Zululand)” to “eastern South Africa (southern KwaZulu-Natal to Eastern Cape) and Swaziland”.

References:

Bowie, R.C.K., J. Fjeldså, S.J. Hackett, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Molecular evolution in space and through time: mtDNA phylogeography of the Olive Sunbird (Nectarinia olivacea/obscura) throughout continental Africa. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 33: 56-74.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, London.

 

ORDERS AND FAMILIES

ORDERS (newly recognized orders)

page 34, Cathartiformes  Cathartidae (New World Vultures)

In accord with AOU-NACC (Chesser et al. 2016), the New World Vultures Cathartidae are removed from Accipitriformes and are placed in a new order, Cathartiformes, based on the very deep phylogenomic divergence between vultures and the rest of Accipitriformes (Jarvis et al. 2014, Prum et al. 2015). The position of New World Vultures in the linear sequence does not change.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2016. Fifty-seventh supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 133: 544-560.

Jarvis, E.D., S. Mirarab, A.J. Aberer, B. Li, P. Houde, C. Li, S.Y.W. Ho, B.C. Faircloth, B. Nabholz, J.T. Howard, A. Suh, C.C. Weber, R.R. da Fonseca, J. Li, F. Zhang, H. Li, L. Zhou, N. Narula, L. Liu, G. Ganapathy, B. Boussau, Md. S. Bayzid, V. Zavidovych, S. Subramanian, T. Gabaldón, S. Capella-Gutiérrez, J. Huerta-Cepas, B. Rekepalli, K. Munch, M. Schierup, B. Lindow, W.C. Warren, D. Ray, R.E. Green, M.W. Bruford, X. Zhan, A. Dixon, S. Li, N. Li, Y. Huang, E.P. Derryberrry, M.F. Bertelsen, F.H. Sheldon, R.T. Brumfield, C.V. Mello, P.V. Lovell, M. Wirthlin, M.P.C. Schneider, F. Prosdocimi, J.A. Samaniego, A.M.V. Velazquez, A. Alfaro-Núñez, P.F. Campos, B. Petersen, T. Sicheritz-Ponten, A. Pas, T. Bailey, P. Scofield, M. Bunce, D.M. Lambert, Q. Zhou, P. Perelman, A.C. Driskell, B. Shapiro, Z. Xiong, Y. Zeng, S. Liu, Z. Li, B. Liu, K. Wu, J. Xiao, X. Yinqi, Q. Zheng, Y. Zhong, H. Yang, J. Wang, L. Smeds, F.E. Rheindt, M. Braun, J. Fjeldsa, L. Orlando, F.K. Barker, K.A. Jønsson, W. Johnson, K.-P. Koepfli, S. O’Brien, D. Haussler, O.A. Ryder, C. Rahbek, E. Willerslev, G.R. Graves, T.C. Glenn, J. McCormack, D. Burt, H. Ellegren, P. Alström, S.V. Edwards, A. Stamatakis, D.P. Mindell, J. Cracraft, E.L. Braun, T. Warnow, W. Jun, M.T. P. Gilbert, and G. Zhang. 2014. Whole-genome analyses resolve early branches in the tree of life of modern birds. Science 346: 1320-1331.

Prum, R.O., J.S. Berv, A. Dornburg, D.J. Field, J.P. Townsend, E.M. Lemmon, and A.R. Lemmon. 2015. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing. Nature 526: 569-573.

FAMILIES (newly recognized families)

pages 493, 496  Modulatricidae (Dapple-throat and Allies)

Spot-throat Modulatrix stictigula, Dapple-throat Arcanator orostruthus, and Gray-chested Babbler Kakamega poliothorax are removed from Promeropidae (Sugarbirds), and are placed in a newly recognized family, Modulatricidae (Dapple-throat and Allies), following Fjeldså et al. (2015).

Reference:

Fjeldså, J., P.G.P. Ericson, U. Johansson, and D. Zuccon. 2015. Three new bird family names. Pages 33–34 in D.W. Winkler, S.M. Billerman, and I.J. Lovette, Bird families of the world. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 652, Rhodinocichlidae (Thrush-Tanager)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Rosy Thrush-Tanager Rhodinocichla rosea is removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies) and is placed in a new monotypic family, Rhodinocichlidae (Thrush-Tanager), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). Position Rhodinocichlidae to immediately follow McKay’s Bunting Plectrophenax hyperboreus.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

pages 649-650, 664, 676-687, Passerellidae (New World Buntings and Sparrows)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), all New World species of Emberizidae (Emberizidae (Buntings and New World Sparrows) are recognized as a separate family, Passerellidae (New World Buntings and Sparrows), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, the relative positions of Passerellidae and Emberizidae do not change: Passerellidae immediately follows Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies), and Emberizidae immediately follows Passerellidae.  Change the English name of Emberizidae from “Buntings and New World Sparrows” to “Old World Buntings”.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 652, Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the two species of chat-tanagers (Calyptophilus) are removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies) and are placed in a new family, Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Calyptophilidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 643, 647, 652, Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the palm-tanagers (Phaenicophilus) are removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies), and the genera Xenoligea and Microligea are removed from Parulidae (New World Warblers. All three genera are placed in a new family, Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). The sequence of species in Phaenicophilidae is Black-crowned Palm-Tanager (Phaenicophilus palmarum),

Gray-crowned Palm-Tanager (Phaenicophilus poliocephalus), White-winged Warbler (Xenoligea montana), and Green-tailed Warbler (Microligea palustris). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Phaenicophilidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings) and Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 649, Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Puerto Rican Tanager (Nesospingus speculiferus) is removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies) and is placed in a new monotypic family, Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Nesospingidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), and Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 655, Spindalidae (Spindalises)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Spindalis is removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies) and is placed in a new family, Spindalidae (Spindalises), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Spindalidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), and Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 646, Zeledoniidae (Wrenthrush)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Wrenthrush (Zeledonia coronata) is removed from Parulidae (New World Warblers) and is placed in a new family, Zeledoniidae (Wrenthrush), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Zeledoniidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager), and Spindalidae (Spindalises).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 643, Teretistridae (Cuban Warblers)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Teretistris is removed from Parulidae (New World Warblers) and is placed in a new family, Teretistridae (Cuban Warblers), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Teretistridae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager), Spindalidae (Spindalises), and Zeledoniidae (Wrenthrush).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

page 646, Icteriidae (Yellow-breasted Chat)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) is removed from Parulidae (New World Warblers) and is placed in a new monotypic family, Icteriidae (Yellow-breasted Chat), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Icteriidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager), Spindalidae (Spindalises), Zeledoniidae (Wrenthrush), and Teretistridae (Cuban Warblers).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

page 652, Mitrospingidae (Mitrospingid Tanagers)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Mitrospingus is removed from Thraupidae (Tanagers and Allies) and is placed in a new family, Mitrospingidae (Mitrospingid Tanagers), following Barker et al. (2013, 2015). AOS-NACC also revised the linear sequence of families in the nine-primaried oscines (Chesser et al. 2017), but we defer completely following the new sequence until our next release (August 2018). In the interim, position Icteriidae to follow Emberizidae (Old World Buntings), Calyptophilidae (Chat-Tanagers), Phaenicophilidae (Hispaniolan Tanagers), Nesospingidae (Puerto Rican Tanager), Spindalidae (Spindalises), Zeledoniidae (Wrenthrush), Teretistridae (Cuban Warblers), and Icteriidae (Yellow-breasted Chat).

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320.

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

 

STANDARD UPDATES and CORRECTIONS

page 2, Southern Brown Kiwi Apteryx australis

Change the English name for the monotypic group Apteryx australis australis from Southern Brown Kiwi (South Island) to Southern Brown Kiwi (South I.).

Change the English name for the monotypic group Apteryx australis lawryi from Southern Brown Kiwi (Stewart Island) to Southern Brown Kiwi (Stewart I.)

 

page 27, geese, genera Anser and Chen

The sequence of species of geese in the genus Anser is revised, based on Ottenburghs et al. (2016); note that Anser now includes several species previously classified in Chen (as detailed below). The sequence that we adopt is:

Bar-headed Goose Anser indicus

Emperor Goose Anser canagicus

Snow Goose Anser caerulescens

Ross’s Goose Anser rossii

Graylag Goose Anser anser

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides

Greater White-fronted Goose  Anser albifrons

Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus

Taiga Bean-Goose Anser fabalis

Tundra Bean-Goose Anser serrirostris

Pink-footed Goose Anser brachyrhynchus

Reference:

Ottenburghs, J., H.-J. Megens, R.H.S. Kraus, O. Madsen, P. van Hooft, S. E. van Wieren, R.P.M.A. Crooijmans, R.C. Ydenberg, M.A.M. Groenen, and H.H.T. Prins. 2016. A tree of geese: a phylogenomic perspective on the evolutionary history of true geese. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 101: 303-313.

 

page 27, Emperor Goose Chen canagica

page 27, Snow Goose Chen caerulescens

page 27, Ross’s Goose Chen rossii

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Chen is merged into Anser; this change is necessary because phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence data reveals Chen is embedded within Anser (Ottenburghs et al. 2016). Change the scientific name of Emperor Goose from Chen canagica to Anser canagicus.

Change the scientific name of Snow Goose from Chen caerulescens to Anser caerulescens. Following the transfer of Snow Goose from Chen to Anser, change the subspecies name atlantica to atlanticus.

Change the scientific name of Ross’s Goose from Chen rossii to Anser rossii.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Ottenburghs, J., H.-J. Megens, R.H.S. Kraus, O. Madsen, P. van Hooft, S. E. van Wieren, R.P.M.A. Crooijmans, R.C. Ydenberg, M.A.M. Groenen, and H.H.T. Prins. 2016. A tree of geese: a phylogenomic perspective on the evolutionary history of true geese. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 101: 303-313.

 

pages 27-28, Canada Goose Branta canadensis

The monotypic group Canada Goose (parvipes) Branta canadensis parvipes is merged into the polytypic group Canada Goose (canadensis/interior) Branta canadensis canadensis/interior. Change the English name of the expanded group to Canada Goose (canadensis Group), and the scientific name to Branta canadensis [canadensis Group].

 

page 30, Baikal Teal Anas formosa

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Anas is partioned into four genera, based on phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data (Gonzalez et al. 2009). Change the scientific name of Baikal Teal from Anas formosa to Sibirionetta formosa.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gonzalez, J., H. Düttmann, and M. Wink. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships based on two mitochondrial genes and hybridization patterns in Anatidae. Journal of Zoology 279: 310-318.

 

page 31, Garganey Anas querquedula

page 31, Hottentot Teal Anas hottentota

page 31, Silver Teal Anas versicolor

page 31, Puna Teal Anas puna

page 31, Blue-winged Teal Anas discors

page 31, Cinnamon Teal Anas cyanoptera

page 31, Red Shoveler Anas platalea

page 31, Cape Shoveler Anas smithii

page 31, Australian Shoveler Anas rhynchotis

page 31, Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Anas is partioned into four genera, based on phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data (Gonzalez et al. 2009). As a result, the blue-winged teals and the shovelers are placed in the genus Spatula. Change the scientific name of Garganey from Anas querquedula to Spatula querquedula.

Change the scientific name of Hottentot Teal from Anas hottentota to Spatula hottentota.

Change the scientific name of Silver Teal from Anas versicolor to Spatula versicolor.

Change the scientific name of Puna Teal from Anas puna to Spatula puna.

Change the scientific name of Blue-winged Teal from Anas discors to Spatula discors.

Change the scientific name of Cinnamon Teal from Anas cyanoptera to Spatula cyanoptera.

Change the scientific name of Red Shoveler from Anas platalea to Spatula platalea.

Change the scientific name of Cape Shoveler from Anas smithii to Spatula smithii.

Change the scientific name of Australian Shoveler from Anas rhynchotis to Spatula rhynchotis.

Change the scientific name of Northern Shoveler from Anas clypeata to Spatula clypeata.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gonzalez, J., H. Düttmann, and M. Wink. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships based on two mitochondrial genes and hybridization patterns in Anatidae. Journal of Zoology 279: 310-318.

 

page 29, Gadwall Anas strepera

page 29, Falcated Duck Anas falcata

page 29, Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope

page 29, American Wigeon Anas americana

page 29, Chiloe Wigeon Anas sibilatrix

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), Anas is partioned into four genera, based on phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data (Gonzalez et al. 2009). As a result, Gadwall, Falcated Duck, and the wigeons are placed in the genus Mareca. Change the scientific name of Gadwall from Anas strepera to Mareca strepera.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Gadwall (Common) from Anas strepera strepera to Mareca strepera strepera.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Gadwall (Coue’s) from Anas strepera couesi to Mareca strepera couesi.

Change the scientific name of Falcated Duck from Anas falcata to Mareca falcata.

Change the scientific name of Eurasian Wigeon from Anas penelope to Mareca penelope.

Change the scientific name of American Wigeon from Anas americana to Mareca americana.

Change the scientific name of Chiloe Wigeon from Anas sibilatrix to Mareca sibilatrix.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gonzalez, J., H. Düttmann, and M. Wink. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships based on two mitochondrial genes and hybridization patterns in Anatidae. Journal of Zoology 279: 310-318.

 

pages 29-31, dabbling ducks genera Sibirionetta, Spatula, Mareca, and Anas

The sequence of species in the dabbling ducks (Sibirionetta, Spatula, Mareca, and Anas) is revised, following Gonzalez et al. (2009). The new sequence of species is:

Baikal Teal Sibirionetta formosa

Garganey Spatula querquedula

Hottentot Teal Spatula hottentota

Silver Teal Spatula versicolor

Puna Teal Spatula puna

Blue-winged Teal Spatula discors

Cinnamon Teal Spatula cyanoptera

Red Shoveler Spatula platalea

Cape Shoveler Spatula smithii

Australian Shoveler Spatula rhynchotis

Northern Shoveler Spatula clypeata

Gadwall Mareca strepera

Falcated Duck Mareca falcata

Eurasian Wigeon Mareca penelope

American Wigeon Mareca americana

Chiloe Wigeon Mareca sibilatrix

African Black Duck Anas sparsa

Yellow-billed Duck Anas undulata

Meller’s Duck Anas melleri

Pacific Black Duck Anas superciliosa

Laysan Duck Anas laysanensis

Hawaiian Duck Anas wyvilliana

Philippine Duck Anas luzonica

Indian Spot-billed Duck Anas poecilorhyncha

Eastern Spot-billed Duck Anas zonorhyncha

Mallard Anas platyrhynchos

American Black Duck Anas rubripes

Mottled Duck Anas fulvigula

Cape Teal Anas capensis

White-cheeked Pintail Anas bahamensis

Red-billed Duck Anas erythrorhyncha

Northern Pintail Anas acuta

Eaton’s Pintail Anas eatoni

Yellow-billed Pintail Anas georgica

Green-winged Teal Anas crecca

Andean Teal Anas andium

Yellow-billed Teal Anas flavirostris

Andaman Teal Anas albogularis

Sunda Teal Anas gibberifrons

Gray Teal Anas gracilis

Chestnut Teal Anas castanea

Bernier’s Teal Anas bernieri

Auckland Islands Teal Anas aucklandica

Campbell Islands Teal Anas nesiotis

Brown Teal Anas chlorotis

Reference:

Gonzalez, J., H. Düttmann, and M. Wink. 2009. Phylogenetic relationships based on two mitochondrial genes and hybridization patterns in Anatidae. Journal of Zoology 279: 310-318.

 

page 54, Tabon Scrubfowl Megapodius cumingii

Subspecies dillwyni Tweedale 1878, previously considered to be a junior synonym of pusillus (e.g., Dickinson et al. 1991), is recognized, following Jones et al. (1995). Insert dillwyni immediately following the heading for the species. The range of dillwnyi is “northern Philippines (Luzon, Mindoro, Marinduque, and Babuyan Islands)”.

With the addition of subspecies dillwyni and tabon, revise the range description of subspecies pusillus from “N and e Philippine Islands” to “central Philippines: Visayan Islands (Masbate, Negros, Cebu, Bohol, Leyte, and Samar), western Mindanao, and Basilan”.

Subspecies tabon Hackisuka 1931, previously considered to be a junior synonym of pusillus (e.g., Dickinson et al. 1991), is recognized, following Jones et al. (1995). Insert tabon immediately following the nominate subspecies cumingii. The range of tabon is “southeastern Philippines (eastern Mindanao)”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., R.S. Kennedy, and K.C. Parkes. 1991. The birds of the Philippines. An annotated check-list. British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 12. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

Jones, D.N., R.W.R.J. Dekker, and C.E. Roselaar. 1995. The megapodes Megapodiidae. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 70, Stone Partridge Ptilopachus petrosus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Stone Partridge (Stone) Ptilopachus petrosus petrosus from “Senegambia to s Sudan, n Uganda and n Kenya” to “Senegambia east to central Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, northern Kenya, and south central Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Stone Partridge (Ethiopian) Ptilopachus petrosus major from “Rocky areas of nw Ethiopia” to “northern Eritrea and northwestern Ethiopia”.

 

pages 60-63, 66, 70, New World Quail Odontophoridae

In accord with AOU-NACC (Chesser et al. 2016) and AOS-SACC (Proposal 706), the sequence of genera in Odontophoridae is revised. This action is based on Hosner et al. (2015). The new sequence of genera is:

Ptilopachus

Rhynchortyx

Oreortyx

Dendrortyx

Philortyx

Colinus

Callipepla

Cyrtonyx

Dactylortyx

Odontophorus

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2016. Fifty-seventh supplement to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American birds. Auk 133: 544-560.

Hosner, P.A., E.L. Braun, and R.T. Kimball. 2015a. Land connectivity changes and global cooling shaped the colonization history and diversification of New World quail (Aves: Galliformes: Odontophoridae). Journal of Biogeography 42: 1883-1895.

 

page 70, Crested Partridge Rollulus rouloul

Revise the range description from “Malay Pen., Sumatra, Borneo, Banka and Belitung islands” to “southern Myanmar (southern Tenasserim), Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Bangka and Belitung islands, and Borneo”.

 

page 69, Chestnut-bellied Partridge Arborophila javanica

Subspecies bartelsi, with range “Mountains of w-central Java”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate javanica (Mees 1996), and is deleted. Revise the range of javanica from “Mountains of w Java” to “mountains of western and central Java”.

Reference:
Mees, G.F. 1996. Geographical variation in birds of Java. Publications of the Nuttall Ornithological Club number 26. Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 64, Rock Partridge Alectoris graeca

With the recognition of subspecies orlandoi, change the scientific name of the polytypic group Rock Partridge (European) from Alectoris graeca graeca/saxatilis to Rock Partridge (European) Alectoris graeca [graeca Group].

With the recognition of subspecies orlandoi, revise the range description of subspecies saxatilis from “Alps (France to Austria), Italy (Apennines), and the western Balkans” to “Alps (France to Austria) and the western Balkans”.

We recognize a previously overlooked subspecies, orlandoi, with range “Italy (Apennine Mountains)”, following Corso (2010, 2012). Insert orlandoi immediately following subspecies saxatilis.

References:

Corso, A. 2010. Sicilian Rock Partridge: identification and taxonomy. Dutch Birding 32: 79-96.

Corso, A. 2012. Additional comments on Rock Partridge morphology: Alectoris graeca orlandoi. Dutch Birding 34: 97-99.

 

page 66, Yellow-necked Francolin Pternistis leucoscepus

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and north central Tanzania”.

 

page 65, Crested Francolin Francolinus sephaena

Crested Francolin is removed from the genus Francolinus and placed in Dendroperdix (Hockey et al. 2005, Wang et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Francolinus sephaena to Dendroperdix sephaena.

Revise the range description of subspecies granti from “Ethiopia to s Sudan, Uganda and n-central Tanzania” to “South Sudan and western Ethiopia to north central Tanzania”.

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Wang, N., R.T. Kimball, E.L. Braun, B. Liang, and Z. Zhang. 2016. Ancestral range reconstruction of Galliformes: the effects of topology and taxon sampling. Journal of Biogeography 44: 122-135.

 

page 65, Schlegel’s Francolin Peliperdix schlegelii

Revise the range description from “Savanna of Cameroon and s Chad to sw Sudan” to “Cameroon, southern Chad, northern Central African Republic, extreme southwestern Sudan, and northwestern South Sudan”.

 

pages 72-73, Ring-necked Pheasant Phasianus colchicus

Revise the range description of subspecies colchicus from “E Georgia to ne Azerbaijan, s Armenia and nw Iran. Pheasants representing a mixture of colchicus, torquatus, and other subspecies now are widely introduced around the world, including across Europe, on New Zealand, the Hawaiian Islands, and North America” to “eastern Georgia to northeastern Azerbaijan, southern Armenia and northwestern Iran. Pheasants representing a mixture of colchicus, torquatus, and other subspecies now are widely introduced around the world, including across Europe, on New Zealand, the Hawaiian Islands, North America, and South America (southern Chile)”.

 

page 72, Crested Fireback Lophura ignita

Revise the range description of subspecies ignita from “Kalimantan (Borneo) and Banka I. (off se Sumatra)” to “Borneo (except for the north) and Bangka I. (off southeastern Sumatra)”.

 

page 59, Eurasian Capercaillie Tetrao urogallus

In accord with current usage (Madge and McGowan 2002, British Ornithologists’ Union 2013), change the English name of Tetrao urogallus from Eurasian Capercaillie to Western Capercaillie.

References:

British Ornithologists’ Union. 2013. The British List: A Checklist of Birds of Britain (8th edition). Ibis 155: 635-676.

Madge, S., and P. McGowan. 2002. Pheasants, partridges, and grouse. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 59, Hazel Grouse Bonasa bonasia

Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data consistently shows that the genus Bonasa is not monophyletic (Kimball et al. 2011, Wang et al. 2013, 2016). Change the scientific name of Hazel Grouse from Bonasa bonasia to Tetrastes bonasia.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name styriaca to styriacus.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name rhenana to rhenanus.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name sibirica to sibiricus.

References:

Kimball, R.T., C.M. St. Mary, and E.L. Braun. 2011. A macroevolutionary perspective on multiple sexual traits in the Phasianidae (Galliformes). International Journal of Evolutionary Biology 2011: 423938.

Wang, N., R.T. Kimball, E.L. Braun, B. Liang, and Z. Zhang. 2013. Assessing phylogenetic relationships among Galliformes: a multigene phylogeny with expanded taxon sampling in Phasianidae. PLoS ONE 8: e64312

Wang, N., R.T. Kimball, E.L. Braun, B. Liang, and Z. Zhang. 2016. Ancestral range reconstruction of Galliformes: the effects of topology and taxon sampling. Journal of Biogeography 44: 122-135.

 

page 59, Severtzov’s Grouse Bonasa sewerzowi

Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data consistently shows that the genus Bonasa is not monophyletic (Kimball et al. 2011, Wang et al. 2013, 2016). Change the scientific name of Severtzov’s Grouse from Bonasa sewerzowi to Tetrastes sewerzowi.

References:

Kimball, R.T., C.M. St. Mary, and E.L. Braun. 2011. A macroevolutionary perspective on multiple sexual traits in the Phasianidae (Galliformes). International Journal of Evolutionary Biology 2011: 423938.

Wang, N., R.T. Kimball, E.L. Braun, B. Liang, and Z. Zhang. 2013. Assessing phylogenetic relationships among Galliformes: a multigene phylogeny with expanded taxon sampling in Phasianidae. PLoS ONE 8: e64312

Wang, N., R.T. Kimball, E.L. Braun, B. Liang, and Z. Zhang. 2016. Ancestral range reconstruction of Galliformes: the effects of topology and taxon sampling. Journal of Biogeography 44: 122-135.

 

pages 58-59, Rock Ptarmigan Lagopus muta

Change the spelling of the subspecies name reinhardti to to the correct original spelling reinhardi (Peters 1934, Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Peters, J.L. 1934. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume II. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 7, Jackass Penguin Spheniscus demersus

In accord with current usage (Williams 1995, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name of Spheniscus demersus from Jackass Penguin to African Penguin.

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Williams, T.D. 1995. The penguins. Spheniscidae. Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 14, White-bellied Storm-Petrel Fregetta grallaria

Change the English name of the monotypic group Fregetta grallaria titan from White-bellied Storm-Petrel (Rapa Island) to White-bellied Storm-Petrel (Rapa I.).

 

page 18, Ascension Island Frigatebird Fregata aquila

In accord with current usage (Brown et al. 1982, Borrow and Demey 2001), change the English name of Fregata aquila from Ascension Island Frigatebird to Ascension Frigatebird.

References:

Borrow, N., and R. Demey. 2001. A guide to birds of western Africa. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Brown, L.H., E.K. Urban, and K. Newman. 1982. The birds of Africa. Volume I. Academic Press, London.

 

page 20, Intermediate Egret Mesophoyx intermedia

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Mesophoyx is merged into Ardea, based on Sheldon (1987), Chang et al. (2003), and Zhou et al. (2014). Change the scientific name of Intermediate Egret from Mesophoyx intermedia to Ardea intermedia.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Intermediate Egret (Intermediate) from Mesophoyx intermedia intermedia to Ardea intermedia intermedia.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Intermediate Egret (Plumed from Mesophoyx intermedia plumifera to Ardea intermedia plumifera.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Intermediate Egret (Yellow-billed) from Mesophoyx intermedia brachyrhyncha to Ardea intermedia brachyrhyncha.

References:

Chang, Q., B.-W. Zhang, H. Jin, L.-F. Zhu, and K.-Y. Zhou. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships among 13 species of herons inferred from mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequences. Acta Zoologica Sinica 49: 205-210.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Sheldon, F.H. 1987. Phylogeny of herons estimated from DNA-DNA hybridization data. Auk 104: 97-108.

Zhou, X., Q. Lin, W. Fang, and X. Chen. 2014. The complete mitochondrial genomes of sixteen ardeid birds revealing the evolutionary process of the gene rearrangements. BMC Genomics 15: 573.

 

page 24, Australian Ibis Threskiornis molucca

Change the spelling of the scientific name of Australian Ibis from Threskiornis moluccus to Threskiornis molucca (Schodde and Bock 2016).

Change the spelling of the subspecies name moluccus to molucca.

Reference:

Schodde, R., and W. Bock. 2016. Conflict resolution of grammar and gender for avian species-group names under Article 31.2.2 of the ICZN Code: is gender agreement worth it? Zootaxa 4127: 161-170.

 

page 49, Secretary-bird Sagittarius serpentarius

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001), change the English name of Sagittarius serpentarius from Secretary-bird to Secretarybird.

Reference:

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

 

page 37, Lammergeier Gypaetus barbatus

Change the English name of Gypaetus barbatus from Lammergeier to Bearded Vulture, to conform to prevailing usage (e.g., Hockey et al. 2005, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Gypaetus barbatus barbatus from Lammergeier (Eurasian) to Bearded Vulture (Eurasian).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Gypaetus barbatus meridionalis from Lammergeier (African) to Bearded Vulture (African).

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 38, Beaudouin’s Snake-Eagle Circaetus beaudouini

Revise the range description from “Senegal and Mauritania to s Sudan, n Uganda and nw Kenya” to “southwestern Mauritania south to Guinea, east to southwestern Sudan and western South Sudan, possibly to northern Uganda”.

 

page 42, Ovampo Sparrowhawk Accipiter ovampensis

In accord with current usage (Zimmerman et al. 1996, Borrow and Demey 2001, Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name of Accipiter ovampensis from Ovampo Sparrowhawk to Ovambo Sparrowhawk.

References:

Borrow, N., and R. Demey. 2001. A guide to birds of western Africa. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Zimmerman, D.A., D.A. Turner, and D.J. Pearson. 1996. Birds of northern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 43, Sharp-shinned Hawk Accipiter striatus

Subspecies madrensis is removed from the polytypic group Sharp-shinned Hawk (Northern) Accipiter striatus [velox Group], and instead is recognized as a separate monotypic group, Sharp-shinned Hawk (Madrean) Accipiter striatus madrensis.

 

pages 36-37, sea eagles genera Haliaeetus, Ichthyophaga

The genus Ichthyophaga (or Icthyophaga) is embedded within Haliaeetus (Lerner and Mindell 2005), and so is merged with that genus. The sequence of species within Haliaeetus is revised, based on Lerner and Mindell (2005). The new sequence of species is:

Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus

White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla

Pallas’s Fish-Eagle Haliaeetus leucoryphus

Steller’s Sea-Eagle Haliaeetus pelagicus

White-bellied Sea-Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster

Sanford’s Sea-Eagle Haliaeetus sanfordi

African Fish-Eagle Haliaeetus vocifer

Madagascar Fish-Eagle Haliaeetus vociferoides

Lesser Fish-Eagle Haliaeetus humilis

Gray-headed Fish-Eagle Haliaeetus ichthyaetus

Reference:

 

Lerner, H.R.L., and D.P. Mindell. 2005. Phylogeny of eagles, Old World vultures, and other Accipitridae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 37: 327-346.

 

page 37, Lesser Fish-Eagle Ichthyophaga humilis

The genus Ichthyophaga (or Icthyophaga) is embedded within Haliaeetus (Lerner and Mindell 2005), and so is merged with that genus. Change the scientific name of Lesser Fish-Eagle from Ichthyophaga humilis to Haliaeetus humilis.

With the transfer of Lesser Fish-Eagle from Ichthyophaga to Haliaeetus, the spelling of subspecies name plumbea changes to plumbeus.

Reference:

Lerner, H.R.L., and D.P. Mindell. 2005. Phylogeny of eagles, Old World vultures, and other Accipitridae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 37: 327-346.

 

page 37, Gray-headed Fish-Eagle Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus

The genus Ichthyophaga (or Icthyophaga) is embedded within Haliaeetus (Lerner and Mindell 2005), and so is merged with that genus. Change the scientific name of Gray-headed Fish-Eagle from Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus to Haliaeetus ichthyaetus.

Reference:

Lerner, H.R.L., and D.P. Mindell. 2005. Phylogeny of eagles, Old World vultures, and other Accipitridae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 37: 327-346.

 

page 46, Common Buzzard Buteo buteo

Change the English name of the monotypic group Buteo buteo rothschildi from Common Buzzard (Azorean) to Common Buzzard (Azores).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Buteo buteo insularum from Common Buzzard (Canary Islands) to Common Buzzard (Canary Is.).

 

page 87, Arabian Bustard Ardeotis arabs

Revise the range description of subspecies butleri from “S Sudan; single record for nw Kenya” to “South Sudan; very rare (resident?) in northwestern Kenya”.

Revise the range description of nominate arabs from “Ethiopia to nw Somalia, sw Saudi Arabia and w Yemen” to “Eritrea, northeastern Ethiopia, Djibouti, and northwestern Somalia; southwestern Saudi Arabia and western Yemen”.

 

page 87, Kori Bustard Ardeotis kori

Revise the range description of subspecies struthiunculus from “Ethiopia to nw Somalia, se Sudan, ne Uganda and n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan to northwestern Somalia, south to northern Uganda and north central Tanzania”.

 

page 87, Houbara Bustard Chlamydotis undulata

Change the English name of the monotypic group Chlamydotis undulata fuertaventurae from Houbara Bustard (Canary Islands) to Houbara Bustard (Canary Is.).

 

page 87, White-bellied Bustard Eupodotis senegalensis

Revise the range description of nominate senegalensis from “SW Mauritania to Guinea, Central African Rep. and s Sudan” to “southwestern Mauritania south to Guinea, east to central Sudan, Eritrea, and northwestern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies canicollis from “Ethiopia to Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “Ethiopia to southeastern South Sudan, northern Uganda, Kenya and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 88, Savile’s Bustard Eupodotis savilei

Revise the range description from “SW Mauritania and Senegal to Nigeria, Chad and s Sudan” to “southwestern Mauritania and Senegal east to Chad and central Sudan”.

 

page 88, Buff-crested Bustard Eupodotis gindiana

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan to eastern Ethiopia, Djibouti, and Somalia to northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and north central Tanzania”.

 

page 81, Mangrove Rail Rallus longirostris

Add a recently described subspecies, Rallus longirostris berryorum Maley et al. 2016, with range “Pacific coast of eastern El Salvador, Honduras, and northern Nicaragua; population in northwestern Costa Rica presumably also refers to this subspecies”. We also recognize berryorum as a new monotypic group, with the English name Mangrove Rail (Fonseca). Insert berryorum immediately following the heading for the species.

Reference:

Maley, J.M., J.E. McCormack, W.L.E. Tsai, E.M. Schwab, J. van Dort, R.C. Juárez, and M.D. Carling. 2016. Fonseca Mangrove Rail: a new subspecies from Honduras. Western Birds 47: 262-273.

 

page 81, Water Rail Rallus aquaticus

Revise the range statement for subspecies hibernans from “Iceland” to “Iceland; declining, and possibly extinct”.

 

page 85, Purple Gallinule Porphyrio martinica

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 725), change the scientific name of Purple Gallinule from Porphyrio martinicus back to Porphyrio martinica, following Schodde and Bock (2016).

Reference:

Schodde, R., and W. Bock. 2016. Conflict resolution of grammar and gender for avian species-group names under Article 31.2.2 of the ICZN Code: is gender agreement worth it? Zootaxa 4127: 161-170.

 

page 85, Tristan Moorhen Gallinula nesiotis

Revise the range statement for Tristan Moorhen (Gough) Gallinula nesiotis comeri from “Gough I. (South Atlantic Ocean)” to “Gough I. (South Atlantic Ocean). Introduced to Tristan da Cunha in 1956”.

 

page 85, Black-tailed Native-hen Tribonyx ventralis

Change the English name of Tribonyx ventralis from Black-tailed Native-hen to Black-tailed Nativehen, to conform to the spelling of similar group names (waterhen, swamphen, and moorhen).

 

page 85, Tasmanian Native-hen Tribonyx mortierii

Change the English name of Tribonyx mortierii from Tasmanian Native-hen to Tasmanian Nativehen, to conform to the spelling of similar group names (waterhen, swamphen, and moorhen).

 

page 86, Eurasian Coot Fulica atra

Change subspecies name novaeguinea to the correct original spelling, novaeguineae (Rand 1940).

Reference:

Rand, A.L. 1940. Results of the Archbold Expeditions. No. 25. New birds from the 1938-1939 expedition. American Museum Novitates number 1072.

 

page 78, White-spotted Flufftail Sarothrura pulchra

Revise the range description of the monotypic group White-spotted Flufftail (Southern) Sarothrura pulchra centralis from “Congo to s Sudan, w Kenya, nw Tanzania and n Angola” to “Congo and northern Angola east to extreme southern South Sudan, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 78, Striped Flufftail Sarothrura affinis

Revise the range description of subspecies antonii from “Montane grasslands of extreme s Sudan to e Zimbabwe” to “extreme southern South Sudan south, locally, to eastern Zimbabwe”.

 

page 97, curlews genus Numenius

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the sequence of species of Numenius is revised, following Gibson and Baker (2012). The new sequence of species is:

Bristle-thighed Curlew Numenius tahitiensis

Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus

Little Curlew Numenius minutus

Eskimo Curlew Numenius borealis

Long-billed Curlew Numenius americanus

Far Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis

Slender-billed Curlew Numenius tenuirostris

Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

page 97, godwits genus Limosa

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the sequence of species of Limosa is revised, following Gibson and Baker (2012). The new sequence of species is:

Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica

Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa

Hudsonian Godwit Limosa haemastica

Marbled Godwit Limosa fedoa

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

page 97, dowitchers genus Limnodromus

The sequence of species of dowitcher (Limnodromus) is revised, based on Gibson and Baker (2012). The new sequence of species is:

Asian Dowitcher Limnodromus semipalmatus

Short-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus griseus

Long-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus scolopaceus

Reference:

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

pages 95-97, snipe and woodcocks, genera Lymnocryptes, Scolopax, Coenocorypha, and Gallinago

The sequence of species of snipes and woodcock (Lymnocryptes, Scolopax, Coenocorypha, and Gallinago) is revised, based on Gibson and Baker (2012). The new sequence of species is:

Jack Snipe Lymnocryptes minimus

Eurasian Woodcock Scolopax rusticola

Amami Woodcock Scolopax mira

Bukidnon Woodcock Scolopax bukidnonensis

Javan Woodcock Scolopax saturata

New Guinea Woodcock Scolopax rosenbergii

Sulawesi Woodcock Scolopax celebensis

Moluccan Woodcock Scolopax rochussenii

American Woodcock Scolopax minor

North Island Snipe Coenocorypha barrierensis

South Island Snipe Coenocorypha iredalei

Forbes’s Snipe Coenocorypha chathamica

Chatham Islands Snipe Coenocorypha pusilla

Snares Island Snipe Coenocorypha huegeli

Subantarctic Snipe Coenocorypha aucklandica

Imperial Snipe Gallinago imperialis

Jameson’s Snipe Gallinago jamesoni

Fuegian Snipe Gallinago stricklandii

Solitary Snipe Gallinago solitaria

Latham’s Snipe Gallinago hardwickii

Wood Snipe Gallinago nemoricola

Great Snipe Gallinago media

Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago

Wilson’s Snipe Gallinago delicata

South American Snipe Gallinago paraguaiae

Puna Snipe Gallinago andina

Noble Snipe Gallinago nobilis

Pin-tailed Snipe Gallinago stenura

Swinhoe’s Snipe Gallinago megala

African Snipe Gallinago nigripennis

Madagascar Snipe Gallinago macrodactyla

Giant Snipe Gallinago undulata

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Gibson, R., and A. Baker. 2012. Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 66–72.

 

page 89, Crab Plover Dromas ardeola

In accord with current usage (Inskipp et al. 1996, Zimmerman et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Steveson and Fanshawe 2002, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012), change the English name of Dromas ardeola from Crab Plover to Crab-Plover.

References:

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Stevenson, R., and J. Fanshawe. 2002. Field guide to the birds of East Africa. T & A D Poyser, London.

Zimmerman, D.A., D.A. Turner, and D.J. Pearson. 1996. Birds of northern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 91, Somali Courser Cursorius somalensis

Revise the range description of subspecies littoralis from “Extreme se Sudan to n Kenya and s Somalia” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, northern Kenya, and southern Somalia”.

 

page 91, Three-banded Courser Rhinoptilus cinctus

Revise the range description of nominate cinctus from “SE Sudan to e Ethiopia, Somalia and n Kenya” to “Ethiopia, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, Somalia, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 103, Gray Noddy Procelsterna albivitta

page 103, Blue-gray Noddy Procelsterna cerulea

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the genus Procelsterna is merged into the genus Anous, following evidence that Procelsterna is embedded within Anous (Cibois et al. 2016). Reposition Gray and Blue-gray noddies to immediately follow Brown Noddy (Anous stolidus).Change the scientific name of Gray Noddy from Procelsterna albivitta to Anous albivitta.

Change the scientific name of Blue-gray Noddy from Procelsterna cerulea to Anous ceruleus. Change the spelling of the nominate subspecies from cerulea to ceruleus.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Cibois, A., J.-C. Thibault, G. Rocamora, and E. Pasquet. 2016. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of Blue and Grey noddies (Procelsterna). Ibis 158: 433-438.

 

page 108, Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse Pterocles exustus

Revise the range description of subspecies floweri from “Formerly Egypt. Extinct” to “formerly widespread in Nile Valley of northern and central Egypt; population greatly reduced (had been considered extinct), but recent records from south central Egypt presumably are this subspecies”.

Revise the range description of subspecies ellioti from “SE Sudan to Eritrea, n Ethiopia and Somalia” to “eastern Sudan, Eritrea, northern Ethiopia, and northern and central Somalia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies olivascens from “S Ethiopia to Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, southwestern Somalia, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 109, Lichtenstein’s Sandgrouse Pterocles lichtensteinii

Revise the range description of subspecies sukensis from “SE Sudan and s Ethiopia to central Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia and northwestern and central Kenya”.

 

page 110, Delegorgue’s Pigeon Columba delegorguei

Revise the range description of subspecies sharpei from “SE Sudan to Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Zanzibar” to “southeastern South Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania (including Zanzibar)”.

 

pages 110-111, Lemon Dove Columba larvata

Revise the range description for subspecies bronzina from “Ethiopia and se Sudan (Boma Hills)” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, and southeastern South Sudan (Boma Hills)”.

Revise the range description for nominate larvata from “S Sudan to Uganda, w Tanzania, Malawi and South Africa” to “southern South Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania south to South Africa”.

 

page 111, Metallic Pigeon Columba vitiensis

Revise the range description for subspecies anthracina from “Palawan, Calauit and islands off north Borneo” to “Palawan and adjacent islands (Calauit, Comiran, and Lambucan), Philippines”.

 

page 113, African Collared-Dove Streptopelia roseogrisea

Revise the range description of nominate roseogrisea from “SW Mauritania and Senegambia to s Sudan and w Ethiopia” to “Mauritania and Senegambia east to Sudan and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 121, Wetar Ground-Dove Gallicolumba hoedtii

page 121, Shy Ground-Dove Gallicolumba stairi

page 121, Santa Cruz Ground-Dove Gallicolumba sanctaecrucis

page 121, Thick-billed Ground-Dove Gallicolumba salamonis

page 121, Bronze Ground-Dove Gallicolumba beccarii

page 121, Palau Ground-Dove Gallicolumba canifrons

page 120, White-bibbed Ground-Dove Gallicolumba jobiensis

page 121, Marquesas Ground-Dove Gallicolumba rubescens

page 120, Caroline Islands Ground-Dove Gallicolumba kubaryi

page 120, Polynesian Ground-Dove Gallicolumba erythroptera

page 121, White-throated Ground-Dove Gallicolumba xanthonura

The genus Gallicolumba is not monophyletic, and many species formerly classified in this genus are removed to the genus Alopecoenas (Jønsson et al. 2011b, Moyle et al. 2013).

Change the scientific name of Wetar Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba hoedtii to Alopecoenas hoedtii.

Change the scientific name of Shy Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba stairi to Alopecoenas stairi. Subspecies vitiensis, with range “Fiji and Tonga (Vava’u, Ha’apai and Nomuka group)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate stairi (Peters 1937), and is deleted; this species thus becomes monotypic. Revise the range of stairi from “Wallis and Futuna Islands and Samoa” to “Fiji, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna Islands, and Samoa”.

Change the scientific name of Santa Cruz Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba sanctaecrucis to Alopecoenas sanctaecrucis.

Change the scientific name of Thick-billed Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba salamonis to Alopecoenas salamonis. Revise the range description of Thick-billed Ground-Dove from “Solomon Islands (Ramos and Makira). Possibly extinct” to “Formerly Solomon Islands (Ramos and Makira). Extinct; last reported 1927”.

Change the scientific name of Bronze Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba beccarii to Alopecoenas beccarii. Revise the range description of subspecies johannae from “Bismarck Archipelago (Karkar and Nissan)” to “Karkar Island (off eastern New Guinea) and Bismarck Archipelago (except for the Admiralty and St. Matthias groups)”. We add a previously overlooked subspecies, masculinus Salomonsen 1972, following Mayr and Diamond (2001) and Dutson (2011). The range of masculinus is “Nissan Island (western Solomon Islands)”. Insert masculinus immediately following subspecies admiralitatis. Following the transfer of Bronze Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba to Alopecoenas, the subspecies name intermedia changes to intermedius.

Change the scientific name of Palau Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba canifrons to Alopecoenas canifrons.

Change the scientific name of White-bibbed Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba jobiensis to Alopecoenas jobiensis. Change the scientific name of subspecies chalconota to chalconotus.

Change the scientific name of Marquesas Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba rubescens to Alopecoenas rubescens.

Change the scientific name of Caroline Islands Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba kubaryi to Alopecoenas kubaryi.

Change the scientific name of Polynesian Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba erythroptera to Alopecoenas erythropterus.

Change the scientific name of White-throated Ground-Dove from Gallicolumba xanthonura to Alopecoenas xanthonurus.

References:

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarcks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

Jønsson, K.A., M. Irestedt, R.C.K. Bowie, L. Christidis, and J. Fjeldså.  2011b. Systematics and biogeography of Indo-Pacific ground-doves. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 59: 538-543.

Mayr, E., and J. Diamond. 2001. The birds of northern Melanesia: speciation, ecology, and biogeography. Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Moyle, R.G., R.M. Jones, and M.J. Andersen. 2013. A reconsideration of Gallicolumba (Aves: Columbidae) relationships using fresh source material reveals pseudogenes, chimeras, and a novel phylogenetic hypothesis. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 1060-1066.

Peters, J.L. 1937. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume III. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page (addition 2017), Tanna Ground-Dove Alopecoenas ferrugineus

The validity of Tanna Ground-Dove Alopecoenas ferrugineus formerly was questioned (Peters 1937), but this species now is widely accepted (Stresemann 1950, Greenway 1958, Dutson 2011). Insert this species, with range “Formerly Tanna Island (Vanuatu). Extinct; not reported since 1774”, immediately following Thick-billed Ground-Dove Alopecoenas salamonis.

 

page (addition 2017), Norfolk Ground-Dove Alopecoenas norfolkensis

The status of Norfolk Ground-Dove Alopecoenas norfolkensis formerly was confused (Peters 1937), but this species now is widely accepted as valid (Goodwin 1970, Gill et al. 2010, Forshaw 2015). Insert this species, with range “Formerly Norfolk Island (Australia). Extinct since ca 1800”, immediately following White-throated Ground-Dove Alopecoenas xanthonurus.

References:

Forshaw, J.M. 2015. Pigeons and doves in Australia. CSIRO Publishing, Clayton South, Victoria, Australia.

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

Goodwin, D. 1970. Pigeons and doves of the world. Second edition. British Museum (Natural History), London and Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

Peters, J.L. 1937. Check-list of birds of the world. Volume III. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

pages 120-121, ground-doves genus Alopecoenas

The genus Alopecoenas is repositioned to follow the genus Henicophaps. The sequence of species in Alopecoenas is revised, based on Moyle et al. (2013).The new sequence of species is:

Wetar Ground-Dove Alopecoenas hoedtii

Shy Ground-Dove Alopecoenas stairi

Santa Cruz Ground-Dove Alopecoenas sanctaecrucis

Thick-billed Ground-Dove Alopecoenas salamonis

Tanna Ground-Dove Alopecoenas ferrugineus

Bronze Ground-Dove Alopecoenas beccarii

Palau Ground-Dove Alopecoenas canifrons

White-bibbed Ground-Dove Alopecoenas jobiensis

Marquesas Ground-Dove Alopecoenas rubescens

Caroline Islands Ground-Dove Alopecoenas kubaryi

Polynesian Ground-Dove Alopecoenas erythropterus

White-throated Ground-Dove Alopecoenas xanthonurus

Norfolk Ground-Dove Alopecoenas norfolkensis

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., R.M. Jones, and M.J. Andersen. 2013. A reconsideration of Gallicolumba (Aves: Columbidae) relationships using fresh source material reveals pseudogenes, chimeras, and a novel phylogenetic hypothesis. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 1060-1066.

 

page 120, ground-doves genus Gallicolumba

The genus Gallicolumba is not monophyletic, and many species formerly classified in this genus are removed to the genus Alopecoenas (Jønsson et al. 2011, Moyle et al. 2013). The sequence of species in Gallicolumba is revised, based on Moyle et al. (2013). The new sequence of species is:

Sulawesi Ground-Dove Gallicolumba tristigmata

Cinnamon Ground-Dove Gallicolumba rufigula

Mindoro Bleeding-heart Gallicolumba platenae

Negros Bleeding-heart Gallicolumba keayi

Sulu Bleeding-heart Gallicolumba menagei

Luzon Bleeding-heart Gallicolumba luzonica

Mindanao Bleeding-heart Gallicolumba crinigera

References:

Jønsson, K.A., M. Irestedt, R.C.K. Bowie, L. Christidis, and J. Fjeldså.  2011b. Systematics and biogeography of Indo-Pacific ground-doves. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 59: 538-543.

Moyle, R.G., R.M. Jones, and M.J. Andersen. 2013. A reconsideration of Gallicolumba (Aves: Columbidae) relationships using fresh source material reveals pseudogenes, chimeras, and a novel phylogenetic hypothesis. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 1060-1066.

 

page 128, Pinon’s Imperial-Pigeon Ducula pinon

With the deletion of subspecies rubiensis (see below), change the scientific name of the polytypic group Pinon’s Imperial-Pigeon (Gray-headed) from Ducula pinon [pinon Group] to Ducula pinon pinon/jobiensis.

Subspecies rubiensis, with range “Central and s New Guinea”, is considered to represent populations in zones of introgression between nominate pinon and subspecies jobiensis (Gibbs et al. 2001, Beehler and Pratt 2016), and is deleted. Revise the range description of nominate pinon from “Aru Islands, w Papuan islands and sw New Guinea” to “west Papuan Islands, Aru Islands, and from Bird’s Head east across southern New Guinea to lowlands south of the Huon Gulf; intergrades with jobiensis around Bird’s Neck in the west, and on the Southeastern Peninsula”.

Revise the range description of subspecies jobiensis from “Yapen I.; n New Guinea e to Huon Gulf and offshore islands” to “Yapen Island, and northern New Guinea east to the Huon Gulf and offshore islands; intergrades with pinon around Bird’s Neck in the west, and on the Southeastern Peninsula”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Gibbs, D., E. Barnes, and J. Cox. 2001. Pigeons and doves: a guide to the pigeons and doves of the world. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 151, White-crested Turaco Tauraco leucolophus

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Nigeria to n Uganda, sw Sudan and w Kenya” to “extreme southeastern Nigeria and northern Cameroon east to western and southern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 151, White-cheeked Turaco Tauraco leucotis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group White-cheeked Turaco (White-cheeked) Tauraco leucotis leucotis from “Podocarpus forests of Eritrea, Ethiopia and se Sudan” to “Eritrea, northern and western Ethiopia, and adjacent eastern South Sudan”.

 

page 158, Black-throated Coucal Centropus leucogaster

Add a range description for subspecies efulenensis: “southwestern Cameroon and northern Gabon”.

 

page 158, Blue-headed Coucal Centropus monachus

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, occidentalis Neumann 1908, following Payne (2005). The range of occidentalis is “Guinea and Ivory Coast east to southern Nigeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and northern Angola; populations of the western and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo variously attributed to occidentalis or to fisheri“. Insert occidentalis immediately after the heading for Blue-headed Coucal Centropus monachus.

Revise the range description of subspecies fischeri from “Ivory Coast to w Kenya, s Sudan, Ethiopia and n Angola” to “southeastern Sudan and South Sudan to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and northwestern Tanzania”.

Reference:

Payne, R.B. 2005. The cuckoos. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 159, Ash-colored Cuckoo Coccycua cinerea

Revise the range description from “S Brazil to n Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia and extreme se Peru” to “breeds Paraguay, northern Argentina, southern Brazil, and Uruguay; winters north at least to Bolivia and western Brazil south of the Amazon, rarely to eastern Peru and southeastern Colombia”.

 

page 154, Shining Bronze-Cuckoo Chrysococcyx lucidus

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Chrysococcyx lucidus lucidus from Shining Bronze-Cuckoo (Golden) to Shining Bronze-Cuckoo (Shining).

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Chrysococcyx lucidus plagosus from Shining Bronze-Cuckoo (Shining) to Shining Bronze-Cuckoo (Golden).

 

page 155, Fork-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus dicruroides

page 155, Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus lugubris

Subspecies barussarum is considered to belong to Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo Surniculus lugubris, not to Fork-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo (Erritzøe et al. 2012). Change the scientific name from Surniculus dicruroides barussarum to Surniculus lugubris barussarum. Reposition barussarum to immediately follow the species heading for Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo. Revise the range of barussarum from “breeds northeastern India, northern Myanmar, northern Thailand, northern Indochina, and southeastern China, including Hainan; the species (mostly this population?) winters south to Sumatra” to “breeds northeastern India, northern Myanmar, northern Thailand, northern Indochina, and southeastern China, including Hainan; winters south to Sumatra”.

Reference:

Erritzøe, J., C.F. Mann, F. Brammer, and R.A. Fuller. 2012. Cuckoos of the world. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 153, Black Cuckoo Cuculus clamosus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Black Cuckoo (Rufous-throated) Cuculus clamosus gabonensis from “Liberia to Ghana, Nigeria, s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “Liberia east to Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Uganda and western Kenya”.

 

page 161, Barn Owl Tyto alba

Change the English name from Barn Owl (Canary Islands) to Barn Owl (Canary Is.).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Tyto alba [delicatula Group] from Barn Owl (Australian) to Barn Owl (Eastern).

Subspecies stertens belongs with the group Barn Owl (Eastern) Tyto alba [delicatula Group] (Aliabadian et al. 2016), and not with the group to which it previously was assigned, Barn Owl (Eurasian) Tyto alba [alba Group].

Subspecies javanica belongs with the group Barn Owl (Eastern) Tyto alba [delicatula Group] (Aliabadian et al. 2016), and not with the group to which it previously was assigned, Barn Owl (Eurasian) Tyto alba [alba Group].

Reference:

Aliabadian, M., M. Alaei-Kakhki, O. Mirshamsi, V. Nijman, and A. Roulin. 2016. Phylogeny, biogeography, and diversification of barn owls (Aves: Strigiformes). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 119: 904-918.

 

page 162, Indian Scops-Owl Otus bakkamoena

page 162, Collared Scops-Owl Otus lettia

Subspecies plumipes, previously classified under Indian Scops-Owl Otus bakkamoena, properly belongs with Collared Scops-Owl Otus lettia (Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, König and Weick 2008). Position plumipes immediately following the species heading for Collared Scops-Owl, and change the scientific name from Otus bakkamoena plumipes to Otus lettia plumipes.

Revise the range description of nominate lettia from “E Nepal to Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand and Indochina” to “eastern Nepal, northeastern India (south to Odisha and northeastern Ghats), Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, and Indochina”.

References:

König, C., and F. Weick. 2008. Owls of the world. Second edition. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 163, Sunda Scops-Owl Otus lempiji

Subspecies cnephaeus, with range “S Malay Peninsula”, previously was recognized as a monotypic group, Sunda Scops-Owl (Singapore) Otus lempiji cnephaeus; but this “group” is a junior synonym of nominate lempiji (Wells 1999), and is deleted. Consequently the polytypic group Sunda Scops-Owl (Sunda) Otus lempiji [lempiji Group] also is deleted.

Reference:

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 166, Vermiculated Screech-Owl Megascops guatemalae

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Vermiculated Screech-Owl (Roraima) Megascops guatemalae roraimae from “Tepuis of se Venezuela and adjacent n Brazil” to “tepuis of southern Venezuela, adjacent northern Brazil, southern Guyana, and Suriname”.

Revise the range description of subspecies napensis from “Tropical e Ecuador and e Colombia” to “Andean foothills of Venezuela, eastern Colombia and eastern Ecuador; populations in coastal mountains of Venezuela presumably also are this subspecies”.

 

page 167, Dusky Eagle-Owl Bubo coromandus

Revise the range description of nominate coromandus from “Pakistan to central India, s Nepal, Assam and Bangladesh” to “Pakistan to northern and central India, southern Nepal, and Bangladesh; disjunct population in southeastern China (Jiangxi and Zhejiang) perhaps also this subspecies”.

Revise the range description of subspecies klossii from “Extreme s China to s Myanmar and w Thailand” to “western and southern Myanmar, southern Thailand, and northern peninsular Malaysia (Wells 2007: 759)”.

Reference:

Wells, D.R. 2007. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume Two. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 172, Sjostedt’s Owlet Glaucidium sjostedti

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Christy and Clarke 1994), change the English name of Glaucidium sjostedti from Sjostedt’s Owlet to Sjöstedt’s Owlet.

References:

Christy, P., and W. Clarke. 1994. Guide des oiseaux de le Réserve de la Lopé. Écofac, Libreville, Gabon.

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

 

page 169, African Wood-Owl Strix woodfordii

Revise the range description of subpecies umbrina from “Ethiopia and se Sudan” to “Ethiopia and eastern South Sudan”.

 

page 175, Striped Owl Pseudoscops clamator

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 713), Striped Owl is removed from Pseudoscops and is placed in the genus Asio, based on genetic evidence (Wink et al. 2009). Change the scientific name from Pseudoscops clamator to Asio clamator. Reposition Striped Owl to follow Madagascar Long-eared Owl Asio madagascariensis.

Reference:

Wink, M., A.-A. El-Sayed, H. Sauer-Gürth, and J. Gonzalez. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of owls (Strigiformes) inferred from DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b and the nuclear RAG-1 gene. Ardea 97: 581-591.

 

page 183, Standard-winged Nightjar Caprimulgus longipennis

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to sw Sudan, n Uganda, Ethiopia and Somalia” to “breeding season from Senegambia to Liberia, east to southwestern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northwestern Uganda (present during the season in southern portion of this region, but breeding there not confirmed); winters north and east from southern Mauritania and northern Sengeal east to central Chad, southern Sudan, eastern South Sudan, central Uganda, Eritrea, western Ethiopia, and western Kenya”.

 

page 182, Donaldson-Smith’s Nightjar Caprimulgus donaldsoni

Revise the range description from “Ethiopia and Somalia to se Sudan and ne Tanzania” to “northwestern and southern Somalia, eastern and southern Ethiopia, eastern Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania; possibly also in southeastern South Sudan”.

 

page 182, Black-shouldered Nightjar Caprimulgus nigriscapularis

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to southeastern Sudan, western Kenya, and southwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Senegambia east, patchily, to southern South Sudan, Uganda, extreme western Kenya, southwestern and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 183, Star-spotted Nightjar Caprimulgus stellatus

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia and central

Kenya” to “southern South Sudan, Ethiopia (and northern Somalia?), and northern Kenya”.

 

page 183, Slender-tailed Nightjar Caprimulgus clarus

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia and n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti, northwestern and southern Somalia, Uganda, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 185, swiftlets genus Collocalia

The sequence of species of Collocalia swiftlets is revised, based on Rheindt et al. (2017). The new sequence of species is:

Pygmy Swiftlet Collocalia troglodytes

Bornean Swiftlet Collocalia dodgei

Christmas Island Swiftlet Collocalia natalis

Cave Swiftlet Collocalia linchi

Plume-toed Swiftlet Collocalia affinis

Gray-rumped Swiftlet Collocalia marginata

Ridgetop Swiftlet Collocalia isonota

Tenggara Swiftlet Collocalia sumbawae

Drab Swiftlet Collocalia neglecta

Glossy Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta

Satin Swiftlet Collocalia uropygialis

Reference:

Rheindt, F.E., L. Christidis, J.A. Norman, J.A. Eaton, K.R. Sadanandan, and R. Schodde. 2017. Speciation in Indo-Pacific swiftlets (Aves: Apodidae): integrating molecular and phenotypic data for a new provisional taxonomy of the Collocalia esculenta complex. Zootaxa 4250: 401-433.

 

page 189, African Palm-Swift Cypsiurus parvus

Revise the range description of nominate parvus from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Ethiopia and sw Arabia” to “Senegambia east to South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia; also southwestern Saudi Arabia and western Yemen”.

Revise the range description of subspecies myochrous from “Higher elevations from s Sudan to ne South Africa” to “southern South Sudan south to northeastern South Africa”.

 

page 203, Speckled Hummingbird Adelomyia melanogenys

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Adelomyia melanogenys inornata from Speckled Hummingbird (inornata to Speckled Hummingbird (inornata).

 

page 700, Brace’s Emerald Chlorostilbon bracei

With the addition of subspecies elegans (see below), we recognize nominate bracei as a new monotypic group, Brace’s Emerald (Brace’s) Chlorostilbon bracei bracei.

Insert a previously overlooked taxon, elegans Gould 1860 (Weller 1999). This taxon may be a valid species (Weller 1999), but provisionally we recognize it as a subspecies of Brace’s Emerald; insert elegans following the entry for nominate bracei, with range “Formerly the Caribbean; extinct. Distribution unknown, possibly occurred on Jamaica or in the Bahamas. Known from a single specimen from 1860”. We recognize elegans as a new monotypic group, Brace’s Emerald (Caribbean) Chlorostilbon bracei elegans.

Reference:

Weller, A.-A. 1999. On types of trochilids in The Natural History Museum, Tring II. Re-evaluation of Erythronota (?) elegans Gould 1860: a presumed extinct species of the genus Chlorostilbon. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 119: 197-202.

 

page 194, Gray-breasted Sabrewing Campylopterus largipennis

Subspecies aequatorialis, with range “E Colombia to Ecuador, Peru, n Bolivia and nw Brazil”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies obscurus (Lopes et al. 2017), and is deleted. Revise the range description of obscurus from “NE Brazil (e Pará and Maranhão)” to “eastern Colombia south to northern Bolivia and east, mostly south of the Amazon, to eastern Amazonian Brazil (eastern Pará and Maranhão)”.

Lopes et al. (2017) described a new taxon of sabrewing from central Brazil, with range “eastern Brazil (southeastern Goiás, southwestern Bahia, and northern Minas Gerais”. They described this sabrewing as a new species, Campylopterus calcirupicola (Dry-forest Sabrewing), but, pending review of this proposed new species by AOS-SACC, we provisionally classify it as a subspecies, Campylopterus largipennis calcirupicola.

Reference:

Lopes, L.E., M.F. de Vasconcelos, and L.P. Gonzaga. 2017. A cryptic new species of hummingbird of the Campylopterus largipennis complex (Aves: Trochilidae). Zootaxa 4268: 1-33.

 

page 202, Berylline Hummingbird Amazilia beryllina

Revise the range description of nominate beryllina from “E and central Mexico (Veracruz to Chiapas)” to “eastern and central Mexico (Veracruz to central Oaxaca)”.

 

page 199, Violet-bellied Hummingbird Damophila julie

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), change the scientific name of Violet-bellied Hummingbird from Damophila julie to Juliamyia julie. The name Damophila Reichenbach 1854 is preoccupied by an earlier use of this name, Damophila Curtis 1832, proposed for a genus of Lepidoptera (Özdikmen 2008).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Özdikmen, H. 2008. Neodamophila nom. nov., a replacement name for the bird genus Damophila Reichenbach, 1854 (Aves: Apodiformes: Trochilidae). Munis Entomology and Zoology 3: 171-173.

 

page 211, Speckled Mousebird Colius striatus

Revise the range description of subspecies jebelensis from “N border of Uganda and s Sudan” to “South Sudan and northern Uganda”.

 

page 212, Blue-naped Mousebird Urocolius macrourus

Revise the range description of subspecies pulcher from “SE Sudan to s Somalia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, and southern Somalia to eastern Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

pages 228-229, Woodhoopoes and Scimitar-bills Phoeniculidae

Change the English name of the family Phoeniculidae from Woodhoopoes and Scimitar-bills to Woodhoopoes and Scimitarbills.

 

page 229, Red-billed Dwarf Hornbill Lophoceros camurus

Revise the range description from “S Sierra Leone to extreme s Sudan, w Uganda and n Angola” to “southern Sierra Leone to Democratric Republic of the Congo, northwestern Angola (Cabinda), southwestern South Sudan and western Uganda”.

 

page 216, Shining-blue Kingfisher Alcedo quadribrachys

Revise the range description of subspecies guentheri from “Coastal sw Nigeria to extreme s Sudan, Kenya and Zambia” to “southwestern Nigeria to extreme southern South Sudan, extreme western Kenya, and northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 226, Boehm’ Bee-eater Merops boehmi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Britton 1980, Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Stevenson and Fanshawe 2002), change the English name of Merops boehmi from Boehm’s Bee-eater to Böhm’s Bee-eater.

References:

Britton, P.L. (editor). 1980. Birds of east Africa. East Africa Natural History Society, Nairobi.

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Stevenson, R., and J. Fanshawe. 2002. Field guide to the birds of East Africa. T & A D Poyser, London.

 

page 235, Red-and-yellow Barbet Trachyphonus erythrocephalus

Revise the range description of subspecies versicolor from “NE Uganda to se Sudan, Ethiopia and n Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, southern and southwestern Ethiopia, southwestern Somalia, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 235, D’Arnaud’s Barbet Trachyphonus darnaudii

Revise the range description of nominate darnaudii from “SE Sudan and sw Ethiopia to ne Uganda and w-central Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan, southwestern Ethiopia, northeastern Uganda, and west central Kenya”.

 

page 236, Red-fronted Tinkerbird Pogoniulus pusillus

Revise the range description of subspecies affinis from “SE Sudan to se Ethiopia, s Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, se Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan to southeastern Ethiopia and southern Somalia, south to northern Uganda, Kenya, Uganda, and eastern Tanzania”.

 

page 237, Red-fronted Barbet Tricholaema diademata

Revise the range description of nominate diademata from “SE Sudan and n-cent. Ethiopia to se Uganda and central Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan and central Ethiopia south to eastern Uganda and central Kenya”.

 

page 237, Black-throated Barbet Tricholaema melanocephala

Revise the range description of subspecies stigmatothorax from “SE Sudan, s Ethiopia and s Somalia to Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, Kenya, and northern and central Tanzania”.

 

page 237, White-headed Barbet Lybius leucocephalus

Revise the range description of nominate leucocephalus from “E Cent. African Rep. and s Sudan to Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “South Sudan to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania; possibly also eastern Central African Republic”.

 

page 238, Sooty Barbet Calorhamphus hayii

page 238, Brown Barbet Calorhamphus fuliginosus

Change the genus name Calorhamphus to the correct original spelling, Caloramphus (Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 243, Yellow-throated Toucan Ramphastos ambiguus

Revise the range description of subspecies abbreviatus from “E slope of Andes of Colombia to w Venezuela and e Peru” to “northeastern Colombia (west slope of the Eastern Andes south to the central Magdalena Valley) and northwestern and northern Venezuela”.

Revise the range description of nominate ambiguus from “Northern section of upper Amazon basin” to “eastern Andes from southern Colombia (upper Magdalena Valley) to central Peru”.

 

page 243, Willcocks’s Honeyguide Indicator willcocksi

Revise the range description of subspecies hutsoni from “N-central Nigeria to s Chad and sw Sudan” to “north central Nigeria east to extreme southern Chad and southwestern South Sudan”.

 

page 243, Pallid Honeyguide Indicator meliphilus

Revise the range description of nominate meliphilus from “E Uganda and central Kenya to central Tanzania and sw Sudan” to “eastern Uganda and central and southeastern Kenya to northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 244, Lesser Honeyguide Indicator minor

Revise the range description of subspecies teitensis from “SE Sudan to Somalia, ne Namibia, Zimbabwe and c Mozambique” to “southeastern South Sudan, southeastern Ethiopia, and southern Somalia south and southwest to Angola, northeastern Namibia, Zimbabwe, and central Mozambique”.

 

page 244, Yellow-rumped Honeyguide Indicator xanthonotus

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name radcliffi to radcliffii.

 

page 244, Rufous-necked Wryneck Jynx ruficollis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Rufous-necked Wryneck (Rufous-necked) Jynx ruficollis ruficollis from “SE Gabon to s Democratic Republic of the Congo, e Uganda, s Sudan, n Angola and e S Africa” to “southeastern Gabon east to Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania, south locally to northern and eastern Angola, northwestern Zambia and adjacent southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Mozambique, and eastern South Africa”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Rufous-necked Wryneck (Bar-throated) Jynx ruficollis pulchricollis from “SE Nigeria and Cameroon to nw Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and nw Uganda” to “southeastern Nigeria and Cameroon to northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, and northwestern Uganda”.

 

page 245, Golden-spangled Piculet Picumnus exilis

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name buffoni to buffonii (David et al. 2009a).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009a. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

page 248, Fine-spotted Woodpecker Campethera punctuligera

Revise the range description of nominate punctuligera from “SW Mauritania to Senegambia, Cameroon, sw Sudan, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southwestern Mauritania south to Sierra Leone, east to Central African Republic and southern Chad (and adjacent southwestern Sudan?), and northern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies balia from “S Sudan to extreme ne Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “South Sudan and extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 248, Golden-tailed Woodpecker Campethera abingoni

Revise the range description of the monotypic group subspecies Golden-tailed Woodpecker (Streak-backed) Campethera abingoni chrysura from “Senegambia to s Sudan, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and w Uganda” to “Senegambia to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and western Uganda”.

 

page 248, Green-backed Woodpecker Campethera cailliautii

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Green-backed Woodpecker (Plain-backed) Campethera cailliautii permista from “E Ghana to sw Sudan, sw Uganda, n Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “eastern Ghana east to extreme southwestern South Sudan and southwestern U Uganda, south to northern Angola and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 249, Buff-spotted Woodpecker Campethera nivosa

Revise the range description of subspecies herberti from “Central African Rep. to w Kenya, sw Sudan, Uganda and e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Central African Republic and extreme southwestern South Sudan to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, central Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 249, Speckle-breasted Woodpecker Dendropicos poecilolaemus

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Nigeria to sw Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “extreme southeastern Nigeria east to southwestern South Sudan, northeastern Democratric Republic of the Congo, Uganda, northern Rwanda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 249, Cardinal Woodpecker Dendropicos fuscescens

Revise the range description of subspecies sharpii from “Cameroon to s Sudan, w Democratic Republic of the Congo and n Angola” to “Cameroon and Central African Republic to western Democratic Republic of the Congo and northern Angola”.

Revise the range description of subspecies lepidus from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to highlands of Ethiopia to Uganda, Kenya, nw Tanzania” to “South Sudan and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo to highlands of Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies hemprichii from “Lower elevations of Ethiopia to Somalia and e Kenya” to “lower elevations of the Horn of Africa: Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia to northern and eastern Kenya”.

 

page 249, Bearded Woodpecker Dendropicos namaquus

Revise the range description of nominate namaquus from “W Cent. Afr. Rep. to s Sudan, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania and Angola” to “western Central African Republic to southern Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya, and from Angola south to Namiibia east to Tanzania, to Botswana, central Mozambique, and northern South Africa”.

 

page 249, Golden-crowned Woodpecker Dendropicos xantholophus

Revise the range description from “SW Cameroon to s Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya and nw Angola” to “southeastern Nigeria and southwestern Cameroon to extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, central Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northwestern Angola”.

 

page 250, African Gray Woodpecker Dendropicos goertae

Revise the range description of subspecies abessinicus from “E Sudan to w Ethiopia” to “eastern Sudan, western Eritrea, and northern and western Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of nominate goertae from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “southwestern Mauritania and Senegambia to South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 250, Brown-capped Woodpecker Dendrocopos nanus

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name gymnopthalmus to gymnopthalmos.

 

page 255, Northern Flicker Colaptes auratus

Change the English name of the monotypic group Colaptes auratus gundlachi from Northern Flicker (Grand Cayman Island) to Northern Flicker (Grand Cayman I.).

 

page 50, Eurasian Kestrel Falco tinnunculus

Change the English name of the polytpic group Falco tinnunculus canariensis/dacotiae from Eurasian Kestrel (Canary Islands) to Eurasian Kestrel (Canary Is.).

 

page 53, Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus

Revise the range description of subspecies ernesti from “Philippines to New Guinea, Bismarck Arch. and Indonesia” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula, Philippines, Greater Sundas, New Guinea, and Bismarck Archipelago; birds of Solomon Islands probably also this subspecies”.

Reverse the sequence of subspecies nesiotes and ernesti, so that nesiotes follows (not precedes) ernesti.

 

page 139, Rose-ringed Parakeet Psittacula krameri

Revise the range description of nominate krameri from “Mauritania to Senegal, Guinea, w Uganda and s Sudan” to “southern Mauritania south to Guinea, east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, and extreme northern Uganda. The species is widely introduced around the world, although the the subspecific identify of these populations is poorly known; now feral across Europe and the Middle East, and locally in north and south Africa, Mauritius, the Seychelles, locally in southeast Asia, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the Hawaiian Islands, locally in North America (California, Florida, and northern Baja California), locally in the Greater and Lesser Antilles, and in Venezuela”.

Revise the range description of subspecies parvirostris from “E Sudan (Sennar) to Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and nw Somalia” to “eastern Sudan, Eritrea, northwestern Ethiopia, and Djibouti”.

 

page 700, Newton’s Parrot Psittacula exsul

Correct the English name of Psittacula exsul from Newton’s Parrot to Newton’s Parakeet.

 

page 700, Paradise Parakeet Psephotus pulcherrimus

Correct the English name of Psephotus pulcherrimus from Paradise Parakeet to Paradise Parrot.

 

page 142, Meyer’s Parrot Poicephalus meyeri

Revise the range description of nominate meyeri from “N Cameroon to s Chad, n Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and Ethiopia” to “northeastern Cameroon to southern Chad, southern Sudan (and South Sudan?), western Ethiopia, and Eritrea”.

Revise the range description of subspecies saturatus from “Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northwestern Tanzania” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 142, Niam-Niam Parrot Poicephalus crassus

Revise the range description from “SW Chad to Central African Republic and extreme sw Sudan” to “southwestern Chad, Central African Republic, extreme northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and extreme southwestern South Sudan”.

 

page 146, Barred Parakeet Bolborhynchus lineola

Revise the range description of subspecies tigrinus from “Mountains of nw Venezuela and Colombia to s Peru” to “Andes from Venezuela south to southwestern Ecuador and to central Bolivia (Santa Cruz); also coastal cordillera of Venezuela (Aragua)”.

 

page 144, Olive-throated Parakeet Eupsittula nana

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Olive-throated Parakeet (Jamaican) Eupsittula nana nana from “Jamaica” to “Jamaica; a population on Hispaniola (Sierra de Baoruco, Dominican Republic) is believed to stem from a recent introduction from Jamaica”.

 

page 143, Golden Parakeet Guaruba guaruba

Correct the spelling of the species name from guaruba to guarouba.

 

page 266, Hooded Pitta Pitta sordida

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Hooded Pitta (Chestnut-crowned) Pitta sordida cucullata from “Foothills of n India to s China (Yunnan) and Indochina” to “breeds Himalayan foothills of northern India east to southern China (Yunnan), northern Myanmar and Indochina, south to Bangladesh, Thailand, and northwestern peninsular Malaysia; winters to southern peninsula Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java”.

Revise the range description of subspecies mulleri from “Greater Sundas and western Sulu Islands” to “Sumatra, Java, Borneo, and western Sulu Islands”.

 

page 293, Variable Antshrike Thamnophilus caerulescens

Change the subspecies name subandinus to the older available name, melanochrous.

 

page 302, Common Scale-backed Antbird Willisornis poecilinotus

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Common Scale-backed Antbird (Buff-breasted) from Willisornis poecilinotus lepidonotus/duidae to Willisornis poecilinotus lepidonota/duidae.

Change the scientific name of subspecies lepidonotus to lepidonota (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 311, Collared Crescentchest Melanopareia torquata

Revise the range description of subspecies bitorquata from “Cerrado of e Bolivia (ne Santa Cruz)” to “cerrado of Bolivia (eastern Santa Cruz) and adjacent Brazil (southwestern Mato Grosso)”.

 

page 308, Ceara Gnateater Conopophaga cearae

Revise the range description from “NE Brazil (Serra de Baturité in n Ceará)” to “local in northeastern Brazil (Serra de Baturité in Ceará, Pernambuco, and Chapada Diamantina in northern Bahia)”.

 

page 283, Plain Xenops Xenops minutus

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, alagoanus Pinto 1954, with range “northeastern Brazil (Paraíba, Pernambuco, and Alagoas)”; insert alagoanus immediately following subspecies genibarbis.

Revise the range description of Plain Xenops (White-throated) Xenops minutus minutus from “E Brazil (Pernambuco) to e Paraguay and ne Argentina” to “eastern Brazil (north to southern Bahia) to eastern Paraguay and northeastern Argentina”.

 

page 281, Pale-browed Treehunter Cichlocolaptes leucophrus

With the addition of subspecies holti, revise the range of nominate leucophrus from “E Brazil (s Bahia to ne Santa Catarina)” to “eastern Brazil (southern Bahia south to Rio de Janeiro)”. Nominate leucophrus is recognized as a new monotypic group, Pale-browed Treehunter (Pale-tailed) Cichlocolaptes leucophrus leucophrus.

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, holti Pinto 1941, with range “southeastern Brazil (São Paulo south to northeastern Santa Catarina)” (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Remsen 2003). Insert holti immediately following nominate leucophrus. Subspecies holti is recognized as a new monotypic group, Pale-browed Treehunter (Rufous-tailed) Cichlocolaptes leucophrus holti.

References:

Remsen, J.V., Jr. 2003. Family Furnariidae (ovenbirds). Pages 162-357 in J. Del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 8. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Ridgely, R.S., and G. Tudor. 1994. The birds of South America. Volume II. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas.

 

page 281, White-throated Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla roraimae

Revise the range description of subspecies paraquensis from “Tepuis of s Venezuela (Mt. Paraque, Parú and Ptari-tepui)” to “tepuis of southern Venezuela (Cerro Sipapo [Cerro Paraque], northwestern Amazonas)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies duidae from “Tepuis of s Venezuela (Mt. Duida and Mt. Yaví)” to “tepuis of southern Venezuela (Cerros Parú, Yavi, Gimé, Duida, and de la Neblina, Amazonas)”.

Subspecies albigularis, with range “Subtropical mountains of se Venezuela (Gran Sabana)”, is a junior synonym of nominate roraimae (Eisenmann in Vaurie 1980: 342, footnote 144), and is deleted. Add a previously overlooked subspecies, urutani Phelps and Dickerman 1980, with range “tepuis of southern Venezuela (Cirres Jaua and Urutaní, southern Bolívar)”.

Revise the range description of nominate roraimae from “Tepuis of extreme n Brazil (Mt. Roraima)” to “tepuis of southern Venezuela (Gran Sabana area, including Roraima), extreme northern Brazil (Roraima), and western Guyana”.

References:

Phelps, W.H., Jr., and R. Dickerman. 1980. Cuatro subespecies nuevas de aves (Furnariidae, Formicariidae) de la region de Pantepui, Estado Bolivar y Territorio Amazonas, Venezuela. Boletín de la Sociedad Venezolana de Ciencias Naturales 138: 139-147.

Vaurie, C. 1980. Taxonomy and geographical distribution of the Furnariidae (Aves, Passeriformes). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 166: 1-357.

 

page 274, Marcapata Spinetail Cranioleuca marcapatae

Revise the range description of subspecies weskei from “SE Peru (cloud forests of Cordillera Vilcabamba in Cuzco)” to “Andes of south central Peru (Mantaro Valley in Junín south to Cordillera Vilcabamba in Cusco)”. Reverse the sequence of the two subspecies, so that weskei is listed before nominate marcapatae.

 

page 273, White-bellied Spinetail Synallaxis propinqua

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 717), change the scientific name of White-bellied Spinetail from Synallaxis propinqua to Mazaria propinqua, based on genetic evidence that White-bellied Spinetail is not a member of the genus Synallaxis (Derryberry et al. 2011, Claramunt 2014). Reposition White-bellied Spinetail to immediately follow Red-and-white Spinetail Certhiaxis mustelinus.

References:

Claramunt, S. 2014. Phylogenetic relationships among Synallaxini spinetails (Aves: Furnariidae) reveal a new biogeographic pattern across the Amazon and Paraná river basins. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 78: 223-231.

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.Derryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973–2986.

 

page 271, Chotoy Spinetail Schoeniophylax phryganophilus

In accord with AOS-SACC, reposition Chotoy Spinetail to immediately follow White-bellied Spinetail Mazaria propinqua (formerly Synallaxis propinqua), which itself is moved to a new position following Red-and-white Spinetail Certhiaxis mustelinus.

 

pages 272-273, spinetail genus Synallaxis

The sequence of species of Synallaxis spintetails is revised, in accord with AOS-SACC. The new sequence of species is:

Ochre-cheeked Spinetail Synallaxis scutata

Gray-bellied Spinetail Synallaxis cinerascens

Plain-crowned Spinetail Synallaxis gujanensis

White-lored Spinetail Synallaxis albilora

Marañon Spinetail Synallaxis maranonica

Great Spinetail Synallaxis hypochondriaca

Necklaced Spinetail Synallaxis stictothorax

Russet-bellied Spinetail Synallaxis zimmeri

Slaty Spinetail Synallaxis brachyura

Silvery-throated Spinetail Synallaxis subpudica

Red-shouldered Spinetail Synallaxis hellmayri

Rufous-capped Spinetail Synallaxis ruficapilla

Bahia Spinetail Synallaxis cinerea

Pinto’s Spinetail Synallaxis infuscata

Dusky Spinetail Synallaxis moesta

McConnell’s Spinetail Synallaxis macconnelli

Cabanis’s Spinetail Synallaxis cabanisi

Cinereous-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis hypospodia

Spix’s Spinetail Synallaxis spixi

Dark-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis albigularis

Rio Orinoco Spinetail Synallaxis beverlyae

Pale-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis albescens

Sooty-fronted Spinetail Synallaxis frontalis

Azara’s Spinetail Synallaxis azarae

Apurimac Spinetail Synallaxis courseni

Hoary-throated Spinetail Synallaxis kollari

Rufous-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis erythrothorax

White-whiskered Spinetail Synallaxis candei

Blackish-headed Spinetail Synallaxis tithys

Rusty-headed Spinetail Synallaxis fuscorufa

Rufous Spinetail Synallaxis unirufa

Black-throated Spinetail Synallaxis castanea

Stripe-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis cinnamomea

Ruddy Spinetail Synallaxis rutilans

Chestnut-throated Spinetail Synallaxis cherriei

 

page 325, Slaty-capped Flycatcher Leptopogon superciliaris

In light of vocal differences (e.g., Ridgely and Greenfield 2001), we resurrect subspecies transandinus. Provisionally we continue to treat subspecies hellmayri as a junior synonym of transandinus, so the range of transandinus is “highlands of Costa Rica and Panama, and west slope of the Andes of Colombia and Ecuador”. We recognize transandinus as a new monotypic group, Slaty-capped Flycatcher (transandinus) Leptopogon superciliaris transandinus.

Revise the range description of subspecies Slaty-capped Flycatcher (superciliaris) Leptopogon superciliaris superciliaris from “Mts. of Costa Rica to Venezuela, n Brazil and w Bolivia” to “coastal mountains and Andes of Venezuela south through Andes of Colombia (except for west slope of Western Andes) and east slope of Andes of Ecuador and Peru (south to the Apurímac Valley in Cuzco)”.

Reference:

Ridgely, R.S., and P.J. Greenfield. 2001. The birds of Ecuador: status, distribution, and taxonomy. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

 

page 333, Cinnamon Manakin-Tyrant Neopipo cinnamomea

Our current sequence of genera in Tyrannidae is based on the lists of AOS-NACC and AOS-SACC, which differ from one another, and neither of which well reflects current knowledge of the phylogeny of these birds. Resolution of this problem is a task that we postpone until a later date. In the short term, with the transfer of Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata from Cotingidae to Tyrannidae (see below), based its relationship to Cinnamon Manakin-Tyrant Neopipo cinnamomea and the spadebills (Platyrinchus), we move Cinnamon Manakin-Tyrant to a new position, immediately following Yellow-breasted Flycatcher Tolmomyias flaviventris.

 

page 313, Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 727), Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata is removed from Cotingidae and placed in Tyrannidae, following genetic evidence that it is closely related to Cinnamon Manakin-Tyrant Neopipo cinnamomea and to spadebills (Platyrinchus) (Ohlsson et al. 2012). Position Kinglet Calyptura between Cinnamon Manakin-Tyrant and the spadebills.

Reference:

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, J. Fjeldså, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. Nuclear DNA from a 180-year old study skin reveals the phylogenetic position of the Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata (Passeriformes: Tyrannides). Ibis 154: 533-541.

 

page 343, Fork-tailed Flycatcher Tyrannus savana

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Fork-tailed Flycatcher (savana) Tyrannus savana savana from “Central and s S America and Falkland Is.; winters to West Indies” to “breeds in central and southern South America (eastern Bolivia and southern Brazil south to central Argentina); southern populations migratory, wintering in northern South America, Trinidad, and Tobago”.

 

page 312, Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 726), Swallow-tailed Cotinga Phibalura flavirostris is repositioned to follow Rufous-tailed Plantcutter Phytotoma rara, based on Berv and Prum (2014).

Reference:

Berv, J.S., and R.O. Prum. 2014. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny of the Neotropical cotingas (Cotingidae, Aves) with a comparative evolutionary analysis of breeding system and plumage dimorphism and a revised phylogenetc classification. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 81: 120-136.

 

page 560, Northern Wattled-Honeyeater Foulehaio taviuensis

Correct the spelling of the species name from taviuensis to taviunensis.

 

page 466, Brown-throated Wattle-eye Platysteira cyanea

Revise the range description of nominate cyanea from “Senegal to Gabon, Angola, Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Senegal to Gabon, Angola, western Central African Republic, and northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies aethiopica from “SE Sudan (Boma) and Ethiopia” to “eastern South Sudan and Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies nyansae from “S Sudan to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Uganda and nw Tanzania” to “eastern Central African Republic and eastern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo to southern South Sudan, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 467, Jameson’s Wattle-eye Platysteira jamesoni

Revise the range description from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to Uganda, se Sudan, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 576, White Helmetshrike Prionops plumatus

Revise the range description of subspecies concinnatus from “Cent. Cameroon to Democratic Republic of the Congo, se Sudan, Ethiopia and n Uganda” to “central Cameroon east to southern Sudan, northern and western Ethiopia, Eritrea, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies cristatus from “Eritrea and w Ethiopia to se Sudan, e Uganda and nw Kenya” to “Eritrea, central and western Ethiopia, eastern South Sudan, eastern Uganda, and northwestern Kenya”.

 

page 466, African Shrike-flycatcher Megabyas flammulatus

Revise the range description of subspecies aequatorialis from “NW Angola to Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, w Kenya and extreme s Sudan” to “northern Angola to central Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya; also southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjacent northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 572, Brubru Nilaus afer

Revise the range description of subspecies minor from “SE Sudan to s Eritrea, Somalia, extreme n Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southeastern Ethiopia, central and southern Somalia, northern and eastern Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 573, Pink-footed Puffback Dryoscopus angolensis

Revise the range description of subspecies nandensis from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, Uganda, w Rwanda and w Kenya” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 573, Marsh Tchagra Tchagra minutus

Revise the range description of nominate minutus from “Sierra Leone to s Sudan, Ethiopia, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “Sierra Leone east to South Sudan, eastern Sudan, and Ethiopia, south to western Kenya and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 573, Black-crowned Tchagra Tchagra senegalus

Revise the range description of subspecies habessinicus from “S Sudan (upper Nile Province) to Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia” to “eastern Sudan and eastern South Sudan to Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, and northwestern Somalia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies armenus from “S Cameroon to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, Mozambique” to “southern Cameroon south to Angola, and east to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, western South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and Tanzania, south to Malawi, northern Mozambique, and northern Zimbabwe”.

 

page 573, Brown-crowned Tchagra Tchagra australis

Revise the range description of subspecies emini from “SE Nigeria to Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Rwanda, w Kenya, nw Tanzania” to “southeastern Nigeria to northern and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, central Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 573, Three-streaked Tchagra Tchagra jamesi

Revise the range description of nominate jamesi from “Extreme se Sudan to Somalia, Uganda, Ethiopia and n Kenya” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, Somalia, northeastern Uganda, northern and eastern Kenya, and extreme northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 573, Luehder’s Bushshrike Laniarius luehderi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Fry and Keith 2000, Harris 2000), change the English name of Laniarius luehderi from Luehder’s Bushshrike to Lühder’s Bushshrike.

Revise the range description from “E Nigeria to s Cameroon, s Sudan, w Kenya and sw Tanzania” to “southeastern Nigeria and southern Cameroon south to northwestern Angola (Cabinda) and southern Congo; northeastern Democratoc Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and western Tanzania”.

References:

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, London.

Harris, T. 2000. Shrikes and bush-shrikes. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 574, Tropical Boubou Laniarius major

Revise the range description of nominate major from “Sierra Leone to s Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi” to “Sierra Leone east to southern South Sudan, Kenya, and Tanzania, south to Malawi”.

 

page 574, Fuelleborn’s Boubou Laniarius fuelleborni

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Fry and Keith 2000, Harris 2000), change the English name of Laniarius fuelleborni from Fuelleborn’s Boubou to Fülleborn’s Boubou.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Laniarius fuelleborni usambaricus from Fuelleborn’s Boubou (Usamabara) to Fülleborn’s Boubou (Usambara).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Laniarius fuelleborni fuelleborni from Fuelleborn’s Boubou (Fuelleborn’s) to Fülleborn’s Boubou (Fülleborn’s).

References:

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, London.

Harris, T. 2000. Shrikes and bush-shrikes. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 574, Rosy-patched Bushshrike Rhodophoneus cruentus

Revise the range description of nominate cruentus from “Extreme se Egypt to Eritrea, Ethiopia and extreme se Sudan” to “extreme southeastern Egypt, northeastern Sudan, Eritrea, and northern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies hilgerti from “E and s Ethiopia to Somalia and n Kenya” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, southern and eastern Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia, and northern and eastern Kenya”.

 

page 575, Sulphur-breasted Bushshrike Telophorus sulfureopectus

Revise the range description of subspecies similis from “S Sudan, Ethiopia, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, e Uganda, Kenya to South Africa” to “southern Sudan, South, Sudan, Ethiopia, southern Somalia, and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo south to Angola, northern Namibia, and South Africa”.

 

page 575, Mt. Kupe Bushshrike Telophorus kupeensis

Change the English name of Telophorus kupeensis from Mt. Kupe Bushshrike to Mount Kupe Bushshrike.

 

page 368, Large Cuckooshrike Coracina macei

Revise the range description of subspecies larutensis from “N Malaya” to “peninsular Malaysia”.

 

page 373, Red-shouldered Cuckooshrike Campephaga phoenicea

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Ethiopia, w Kenya and n Angola” to “Senegambia to southern Sudan, Ethiopia, and Eritrea, south to northern Congo, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 484, Gray Whistler Pachycephala simplex

Change the the scientific name of the polytypic group Pachycephala simplex simplex/dubia to Pachycephala simplex simplex/brunnescens, and change the English name of this group from Gray Whistler (Gray) to Gray Whistler (Brown).

The subspecies name dubia is preoccupied in Pachycephala, and is replaced by the new name brunnescens Wolters (Wolters 1980, Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Subspecies gagiensis, with range “Gagi I. (New Guinea)”; subspecies waigeuensis, with range “Waigeo and Gebe islands (New Guinea)”; and subspecies perneglecta, with range “S New Guinea”, all are considered to be junior synonyms of subspecies griseiceps (Beehler and Pratt 2016), and are deleted. Revise the range description of griseiceps from “Aru Islands and ne New Guinea” to “New Guinea: northwestern Islands, Aru Islands, Bird’s Head and Bird’s Neck to southern lowlands, Trans-Fly, and southern Southeastern Peninsula east to Port Moresby”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Wolters, H.E. 1980. Die Vogelarten der Erde. Paul Parey, Hamburg.

 

page 570, Emin’s Shrike Lanius gubernator

Revise the range description from “Savanna of Ivory Coast to s Sudan, n Uganda and ne Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Ivory Coast to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 571, Taita Fiscal Lanius dorsalis

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to Somalia, Ethiopia and ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 571, Northern Fiscal Lanius humeralis

Revise the range description of subspecies smithii from “Guinea to s Sudan” to “Guinea to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and western Uganda”.

 

page 572, Yellow-billed Shrike Corvinella corvina

Revise the range description of subspecies caliginosa from “Sudan (Bahr al Ghazal)” to “western South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies affinis from “S Sudan to extreme ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, n Uganda and w Kenya” to “southern South Sudan to extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 572, White-rumped Shrike Eurocephalus ruppelli

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan and Uganda to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and Tanzania”.

 

page 624, Tawny-crowned Greenlet Tunchiornis ochraceiceps

Revise the range description of subspecies ferrugineifrons from “SE Colombia to the Guianas, e Peru and nw Amazonian Brazil” to “southeastern Colombia east to southern Venezuela, extreme western Guyana, and northwestern Brazil (west of the Rio Negro), south to northeastern Peru and western Amazonian Brazil south of the Amazon, east to the west bank of the Madeira river”.

Revise the range description of subspecies viridior from “Tropical s Peru (Ayacucho and Cuzco) to n Bolivia” to “eastern Peru (south of the Marañón and Amazon rivers) south to northern Bolivia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies luteifrons from “Extreme e Venezuela, the Guianas and n Amazonian Brazil” to “extreme eastern Venezuela (eastern Bolívar), the Guianas and northern Amazonian Brazil (east of the Rio Negro)”.

 

page 622, Cassin’s Vireo Vireo cassinii

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name lucasanas to lucasanus (Brewster 1891).

Reference:

Brewster, W. 1891. Descriptions of seven supposed new North American birds. Auk 8: 139-149.

 

page 488, Variable Pitohui Pitohui kirhocephalus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the polytypic group Variable Pitohui (Raja Ampat) from Pitohui kirhocephalus cervineiventris/pallidus to Pitohui kirhocephalus cerviniventris/pallidus.

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name cervineiventris to cerviniventris (Gray 1861).

Reference:

Gray, G.R. 1861. Remarks on, and descriptions of, new species of birds lately sent by Mr. A. R. Wallace from Waigiou, Mysol, and Gagie Islands. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London [1861] 427-438.

 

page 569, Black-winged Oriole Oriolus nigripennis

Revise the range description from “S Guinea to se Sudan, Cameroon and Angola; Bioko I.” to “Sierra Leone and Liberia east to northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and western Uganda, south to northern Angola; Bioko I.”.

 

page 577, Square-tailed Drongo Dicrurus ludwigii

Revise the range description of subspecies sharpei from “Senegal to n Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “Senegal to northwestern Angola, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda and western Kenya”.

 

page 468, Northern Fantail Rhipidura rufiventris

Change the English name of the monotypic group Rhipidura rufiventris obiensis from Northern Fantail (Gray-backed) to Northern Fantail (Obi).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Rhipidura rufiventris bouruensis from Northern Fantail (Rusty-bellied) to Northern Fantail (Buru).

The polytypic group Northern Fantail (Plain) Rhipidura rufiventris [gularis Group], which included subspecies cinerea, perneglecta, assimilis, and gularis, is partitioned. Subspecies perneglecta, with (incorrect!) range “Watubela Islands (s Moluccas)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies assimilis (White and Bruce 1986, Schodde and Matthews 1977), and is deleted. Revise the range description of subspecies assimilis from “Kai Islands (Kai Kecil and Kai Besar)” to “Tayandu Islands and Kai Islands, South Moluccas”. Subspecies assimilis and subspecies finitima, which formerly was included in the polytypic group Northern Fantail (Cream-bellied) Rhipidura rufiventris [rufiventris Group], together form a new group, Northern Fantail (Kai) Rhipidura assimilis/finitima. Subspecies gularis is transfered, with subspecies vidua (formerly included in the polytypic group Northern Fantail (Slaty) Rhipidura rufiventris vidua/kordensis) to the polytpic group Northern Fantail (Melanesian) Rhipidura rufiventris [setosa Group]. Subspecies cinerea is recognized as a new monotypic group, Northern Fantail (Seram) Rhipidura rufiventris cinerea.

Correct the range description of subspecies finitima from “Tayandu Islands (Taam, Kilsuin and Kur)” to “Tiur, Watubela Islands, South Moluccas”.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Rhipidura rufiventris tenkatei from Northern Fantail (Speckle-throated) to Northern Fantail (Rote).

The polytypic group Northern Fantail (Cream-bellied) Rhipidura rufiventris [rufiventris Group], which included subspecies rufiventris, finitima, pallidiceps, hoedti, and isura, is partitioned. Subspecies rufiventris and pallidiceps together form a new polytypic group, Northern Fantail (Timor) Rhipidura rufiventris rufiventris/pallidiceps. Two subspecies are recognized as new monotypic groups: Northern Fantail (Banda Sea) Rhipidura rufiventris hoedti. Subspecies isura joins a new polytypic group, Northern Fantail (Northern) Rhipidura rufiventris [isura Group]. Subspecies hoedti is recognized as a new monotypic group, Northern Fantail (Banda Sea) Rhipidura rufiventris hoedti.

Subspecies kordensis, previously included in the polytypic group Northern Fantail (Slaty) Rhipidura rufiventris vidua/kordensis, is recognized as a new monotypic group, Northern Fantail (Biak) Rhipidura rufiventris kordensis.

References:

Schodde, R., and S.J. Mathews. 1977. Contributions to Papuasian ornithology V. Survey of the birds of Taam Island, Kai Group. Division of Wildlife Research technical paper number 33, CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia.

White, C.M.N., and M.D. Bruce. 1986. The birds of Wallacea. (Sulawesi, the Moluccas & Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia). British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 7. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

 

page 472, Blue-headed Crested-Flycatcher Trochocercus nitens

Revise the range description of nominate nitens from “Nigeria and Cameroon to Gabon, n Angola, e Democratic Republic of the Congo and s Sudan” to “Nigeria and Cameroon to Gabon, northern Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi”.

 

page 473, African Paradise-Flycatcher Terpsiphone viridis

Revise the range description of subspecies speciosa from “S Cameroon to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and Gabon” to “southern Cameroon south to northeastern Angola, east to Democratic Republic of the Congo and southwestern South Sudan”.

 

page 475, Fiji Shrikebill Clytorhynchus vitiensis

Change the subspecies name compressirostris Layard 1876 to the older available name brunneus Ramsay 1875.

 

page 476, Spectacled Monarch Symposiachrus trivirgatus

Delete subspecies bernsteinii, with range “Salawati I. (New Guinea)”. No representative of this species occurs on Salawati; the single known specimen of bernsteinii apparently came from Ambon Island, and so bernsteinii is a junior synomym of nigrivmentum (Dekker 2003, Beehler and Pratt 2016).

Revise the range description of subspecies albiventris from “S New Guinea; Torres Straits is.; Cape York Pen to Burdekin R.” to “northeastern Australia: Torres Straits islands, and coastal northeastern Queensland (Cape York south to McIlwraith Range)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies melanopterus from “Louisiade Archipelago” to “Southeastern Islands (southeastern New Guinea)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies gouldii from “E Australia (Clarke Range, Queensland to near Sydney, NSW)” to “breeds eastern Australia (Clarke Range, Queensland south to near Sydney, New Sout Wales); at least partially migratory, wintering to southern New Guinea (Trans-Fly) and Torres Strait Islands”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dekker, R.W.R.J. 2003.Type specimens of birds in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden. Part 2. Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Technical Bulletin 6.

 

page 590, Eurasian Jay Garrulus glandarius

Correct the subspecies name barringtoni to the correct original spelling, haringtoni. Subspecies haringtoni belongs to the polytypic group Eurasian Jay (Himalayan) Garrulus glandarius [bispecularis Group] (Hartert 1918, Vaurie 1959), and not to the group Eurasian Jay (White-faced); reposition haringtoni to follow subspecies sinensis.

Subspecies oatesi, previously included in the group Eurasian Jay (Himalayan), should be placed in the Eurasian Jay (White-faced) (Hartert 1918, Goodwin 1976). Reposition oatesi to follow the heading for the group Eurasian Jay (White-faced). Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Eurasian Jay (White-faced) from Garrulus glandarius leucotis/barringtoni to Garrulus glandarius leucotis/oatesi.

References:

Goodwin, D. 1976. Crows of the world. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

Hartert, E. 1918. Garrulus bispecularis and its allies, with list of all forms of Garrulus. Novitates Zoologicae 25: 430-433.

Vaurie, C. 1959. The birds of the Palearctic fauna. Passeriformes. H.F. & G. Witherby Limited, London.

 

page 591, Rufous Treepie Dendrocitta vagabunda

Revise the range description of subspecies behni from “northeastern Pakistan and northwestern India to western Nepal” to “western India (Rajasthan, western Madhya Pradesh, and Gujarat south to Karnataka)” (Ripley 1982, Steinheimer 2009).

References:

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

Steinheimer, F.D. 2009. The type specimens of Corvidae (Aves) in the Museum für Naturkunde at the Humboldt-University of Berlin, with the description of a new subspecies of Dendrocitta vagabunda. Zootaxa 2149: 1-49.

 

page 592, Gray Treepie Dendrocitta formosae

Revise the range description of subspecies assimilis from “S Myanmar to Thailand and Andaman Islands” to “southern Myanmar to Thailand”.

 

page 592, Eurasian Magpie Pica pica

Change the English name of the monotypic group Pica pica mauritanica from Eurasian Magpie (African) to Eurasian Magpie (North African).

 

page 593, Eurasian Jackdaw Corvus monedula

Revise the range description of subspecies spermologus from “W and central Europe; > to Canary Islands and Corsica” to “western and central Europe, including the British Isles, and Morocco and northwestern Algeria”.

Revise the range description of subspecies cirtensis from “N Africa (Morocco and Algeria)” to “northeastern Algeria; formerly also northwestern Tunisia, that population now extinct”.

 

page 595, Somali Crow Corvus edithae

Revise the range description from “Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and se Sudan” to “Eritrea, Djibouti, eastern and southern Ethiopia, Somalia, extreme southeastern South Sudan, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 595, Thick-billed Raven Corvus crassirostris

Revise the range description from “Mts. of Ethiopia and Eritrea; vagrant to nw Somalia and se Sudan” to “Eritrea and Ethiopia”.

 

page 480, New Zealand Robin Petroica australis

Change the English name of the monotypic group Petroica australis longipes from New Zealand Robin (North Island) to New Zealand Robin (North I.).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Petroica australis australis/rakiura from New Zealand Robin (South Island) to New Zealand Robin (South I.).

 

page 382, Western Nicator Nicator chloris

Revise the range description from “Senegal to Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, extreme s Sudan and w Tanzania” to “Senegal to northern Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Tanzania”.

 

page 352, Chestnut-backed Sparrow-Lark Eremopterix leucotis

Revise the range description of subspecies melanocephalus from “Senegambia to Nile River” to “Senegambia to central and southern Sudan”.

Revise the range description of nominate leucotis from “E and s Sudan to Eritrea and Ethiopia” to “South Sudan to Ethiopia, Eritrea, and northwestern Somalia”.

 

page 352, Chestnut-headed Sparrow-Lark Eremopterix signatus

Revise the range description of nominate signatus from “Extreme se Sudan to se Ethiopia and Somalia” to “southern and eastern Ethiopia, Somalia, and eastern Kenya”.

Revise the range description of subspecies harrisoni from “SE Sudan to nw Kenya (west of Lake Turkana)” to “southeastern South Sudan and northwestern Kenya”.

 

page 349, Red-winged Lark Mirafra hypermetra

Revise the range description of subspecies kidepoensis from “S Sudan and ne Uganda” to “southeastern South Sudan and northeastern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies kathangorensis from “Extreme se Sudan” to “southeastern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia”.

 

page 349, Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea

Revise the range description of subspecies furensis from “W-c Sudan (w Darfur)” to “southwestern Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies sobatensis from “C Sudan (confluence of White Nile and Sobat rivers)” to “northeastern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies torrida from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, Uganda, c Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern Sudan and southeastern Ethiopia south to central Uganda, central Kenya, and central Tanzania”.

 

page 348, White-tailed Lark Mirafra albicauda

Revise the range description from “W Chad to s Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania” to “western Chad; eastern Sudan; northern South Sudan; northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, south central Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 348, Singing Bushlark Mirafra cantillans

Revise the range description of subspecies marginata from “S Sudan to Eritrea, ne Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya” to “South Sudan, eastern Uganda, northern and southeastern Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, western Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 353, Syke’s Short-toed Lark Calandrella dukhunensis

Correct the English name from Syke’s Short-toed Lark to Sykes’s Short-toed Lark.

 

page 356, Thekla Lark Galerida theklae

Change the English name of Galerida theklae from Thekla Lark to Thekla’s Lark.

 

page 356, Maghreb Lark Galerida macrorhyncha

Correct the spelling of subspecies name randoni to randonii (David et al. 2009a).

Reference:

David, N., E.C. Dickinson, and S.M.S. Gregory. 2009a. Contributions to a list of first reviser actions: ornithology. Zootaxa 2085: 1-24.

 

page 360, Chilean Swallow Tachycineta meyeni

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 718), change the species name of Chilean Swallow from meyeni (back) to leucopyga, following Mlíkovsky and Frahnert (2009).

Reference:

Mlíkovsky, J., and S. Frahnert. 2009. Nomenclatural notes on Neotropical swallows of the genus Tachycineta Cabanis (Aves: Hirundinidae). Zootaxa 2209: 65-68.

 

page 358, Banded Martin Riparia cincta

Revise the range description of subspecies suahelica from “S Sudan to Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique” to “southern South Sudan to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, western Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe, and western Mozambique”.

 

page 361, Rock Martin Ptyonoprogne fuligula

Revise the range description of subspecies fusciventris from “S Chad, CAR, w and s Sudan, sw Ethiopia to n Mozambique” to “central and southern Chad, Central African Republic, western Sudan, South Sudan, and southwestern Ethiopia south through East Africa to northern Mozambique”.

 

page 361, Ethiopian Swallow Hirundo aethiopica

Revise the range description of nominate aethiopica from “Senegambia to se Sudan, w Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania” to “patchily distributed from Senegambia east to Benin, then more widespread from southern Niger and northern Benin east to western Ethiopia, south in East Africa to Uganda, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzaniato se Sudan, w Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania”.

 

page 362, Red-rumped Swallow Cecropis daurica

Revise the range description of subspecies emini from “S Sudan to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi” to “southeastern South Sudan and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo south through Uganda and Kenya to Malawi and northern Zambia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies domicella from “SSenegambia to s Sudan and extreme nw Uganda” to “Senegambia and Guinea east to southwestern Sudan, South Sudan, and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 361, Lesser Striped-Swallow Cecropis abyssinica

Revise the range description of nominate abyssinica from “E Sudan to Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia” to “southeastern Sudan (and northeastern South Sudan?), Ethiopia, and Eritrea”.

Revise the range description of subspecies unitatis from “S Sudan to Kenya, w Uganda, Gabon and e Cape Province” to “Gabon east to southern South Sudan, Kenya, and southern Somalia, south to central Angola, eastern Zambia, Zimbabwe, eastern Botswana, Mozambique, and eastern South Africa”.

Revise the range description of subspecies bannermani from “NE C African Republic to sw Sudan (Darfur Province)” to “northeastern Central African Republic to southwestern Sudan and northwestern South Sudan”.

 

page 362, Rufous-chested Swallow Cecropis semirufa

Revise the range description of subspecies gordoni from “Senegal to s Sudan, n Angola, sw Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “Senegambia east to southern South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda,southwestern Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania, south to northern Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 362, Mosque Swallow Cecropis senegalensis

Revise the range description of nominate senegalensis from “Mauritania and Senegambia to s Chad and s Sudan” to “southwestern Mauritania and Senegambia to southern Chad and southern Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies saturatior from “S Ghana to Gabon, Ethiopia, Uganda and Kenya” to “southern Ghana east to South Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya, south to Congo and northern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 357, White-headed Sawwing Psalidoprocne albiceps

Revise the range description of the monotypic group White-headed Sawwing (White-headed) Psalidoprocne albiceps albiceps from “s Sudan to w Kenya, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi” to “southeastern South Sudan,eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya south to northern Zambia and northern Malawi”.

 

page 357, Black Sawwing Psalidoprocne pristoptera

Revise the range description of subspecies chalybea from “Extreme se Nigeria to Cameroon, C African Rep. and Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “extreme southeastern Nigeria and Cameroon to Central African Republic, northwestern South Sudan, and northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies oleaginea from “SW Ethiopia (Maji region)” to “eastern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies mangbettorum from “Extreme ne Democratic Republic of the Congo to extreme sw Sudan” to “extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and southern South Sudan”.

 

page 472, African Blue-Flycatcher Elminia longicauda

Blue-Flycatchers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in three different, unrelated genera (Elminia, Cyornis, and Ficedula). Therefore change the English name of Elminia longicauda from African Blue-Flycatcher to African Blue Flycatcher.

Revise the range description of subspecies teresita from “Cameroon south to northern Angola, and east to South Sudan, western Kenya, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 472, White-tailed Blue-Flycatcher Elminia albicauda

Blue-Flycatchers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in three different, unrelated genera (Elminia, Cyornis, and Ficedula). Therefore change the English name of Elminia albicauda from White-tailed Blue-Flycatcher to White-tailed Blue Flycatcher.

 

page 472, Dusky Crested-Flycatcher Elminia nigromitrata

Revise the range description of nominate nigromitrata from “Cameroon to s Sudan, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania” to “Cameroon and Gabon east across northern Democratic Republic of the Congo to southern Central Africa Republic, southwestern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 454, Gray-headed Canary-Flycatcher Culicicapa ceylonensis

Revise the range description for subspecies antioxantha from “Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, and Bali” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, Bali, and Borneo”.

 

page 526, White-shouldered Black-Tit Melaniparus guineensis

Revise the range description from “Senegal to s Sudan, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, sw Ethiopia, n Uganda, w Kenya” to “southern Mauritania and Senegal east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, and southwestern Ethiopia, south to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and extreme western Kenya”.

 

page 526, White-bellied Tit Melaniparus albiventris

Revise the range description from “Disjunct in mts. of Nigeria/Cameroon; se Sudan to Tanzania” to “southeastern Nigeria and central Cameroon; southeastern South Sudan south to Tanzania”.

 

page 533, Yellow Penduline-Tit Anthoscopus parvulus

Revise the range description of nominate parvulus from “Chad to s Sudan and ne Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Chad to southern South Sudan and northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 530, White-breasted Nuthatch Sitta carolinensis

Revise the range description of subspecies tenuissima from “British Columbia and Cascades to Sierra Nevada of n California” to “British Columbia and Cascades to the east slope of the Sierra Nevada of northern California (south to Tulare County)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies aculeata from “W Washington to Oregon, California and n Baja (Sierra Juárez)” to “western Washington to western Oregon (east to the west slope of the Cascades), California (east to the west slope of the Sierra Nevada), and northern Baja California (Sierra Juárez)”.

 

page 530, Rock Nuthatch Sitta neumayer

In accord with current usage (Harrap and Quinn 1995), change the English name of Sitta neumayer from Rock Nuthatch to Western Rock Nuthatch.

Reference:

Harrap, S., and D. Quinn. 1995. Chickadees, tits, nuthatches & treecreepers. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 531, Persian Nuthatch Sitta tephronota

In accord with current usage (Harrap and Quinn 1995, Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012), change the English name of Sitta tephronota from Persian Nuthatch to Eastern Rock Nuthatch.

References:

Harrap, S., and D. Quinn. 1995. Chickadees, tits, nuthatches & treecreepers. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 393, Bewick’s Wren Thryomanes bewickii

Subspecies altus, with range “E North America (s Ontario to central Georgia)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate bewickii (Phillips 1986, Pyle 1997), and is deleted. Revise the range description of nominate bewickii from “N-central US to Kansas, Nebraska and Mississippi” to “eastern North America, from northeastern Kansas and southern Iowa east to southern Ontario and central Pennsylvania, south to northern Arkansas, northern Alabamba, and central South Carolina; but extirpated from most of its range east of the Mississippi River”. The polytypic group Bewick’s Wren (bewickii/altus) Thryomanes bewickii bewickii/altus becomes the monotypic group Bewick’s Wren (bewickii) Thryomanes bewickii bewickii.

Change the names of the polytypic group Bewick’s Wren (eremophilus Group) Thryomanes bewickii [eremophilus Group] to Bewick’s Wren (mexicanus Group) Thryomanes bewickii [mexicanus Group].

Revise the range description of subspecies cryptus from “Kansas and Oklahoma to s Texas and ne Mexico (n Tamaulipas)” to “eastern Colorado south through western Oklahoma and western Texas to northeastern Mexico (northern Nuevo León)”.

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, pulichi Phillips 1986, with range “central United States, in Kansas, Oklahoma, and presumably north central Texas, and east, perhaps, to Missouri; mostly resident, but some winter in south central Texas and perhaps northeastern Mexico”. Insert pulichi immediately following subspecies cryptus.

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, sadai Phillips 1986, with range “southernmost Texas and northeastern Mexico (south to central Tamaulipas)”. Insert sadai immediately following subspecies pulichi.

Change the subspecies name bairdii to the older available name mexicanus (Paynter and Vaurie 1960, Phillips 1986). Subspecies percnus is considered to be a junior synonym of mexicanus (Phillips 1986), and is deleted. Revise the range description of mexicanus from “SE Mexico (Oaxaca, Veracruz and s Puebla)” to “central Mexico (Jalisco to western Veracruz, south to south central Oaxaca)”.

Subspecies atrestus, with range “S-central Oregon to ne California and w-central Nevada”, is considered to be a junior synonym of drymoecus (Phillips 1986), and is deleted.

Subspecies correctus, with range “Coastal California (San Benito County to San Diego)”; subspecies nesophilus, with range “Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and Anacapa Islands off s California”; and subspecies catalinae, with range “Catalina Island (off Southern California)”, all are considered to be junior synonyms of charienturus (Phillips 1986), and are deleted. Revise the range description of charienturus from “N Baja California (south to 30ºN)” to “southwestern California (north to Morro Bay), including the northern Channel Islands, and northwestern Baja California, Mexico”.

References:

Phillips, A.R. 1986. The known birds of North and Middle America. Part I. Hirundinidae to Mimidae; Certhiidae. Privately published, Denver, Colorado.

Pyle, Peter. 1997. Identification guide to North American birds. Part I. Slate Creek Press, Bolinas, California.

Paynter, R.A., Jr., and C. Vaurie. 1960. Family Troglodytidae, wrens. Pages 379-440 in E. Mayr and J.C. Greenway, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume IX. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 396, Santa Marta Wood-Wren Henicorhina anachoreta

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 743), change the English name of Henicorhina anachoreta from Santa Marta Wood-Wren to Hermit Wood-Wren.

 

page 397, Musician Wren Cyphorhinus arada

Subspecies urbanoi, with range “Brazil (Pará in vicinity of Faro and Obidos)”, and subspecies faroensis, with range “N Brazil”, are considered to be junior synonyms of nominate arada (Bocalini and Silveira 2016), and are deleted. Revise the range description of arada from “S Venezuela (Gran Sabana) to the Guianas and adjacent ne Brazil” to “eastern Venezuela, the Guianas, and northern Brazil (north of the Amazon, east of the Rio Negro)”.

Reference:

Bocalini, F., and L.F. Silveira. 2016. A taxonomic revision of the Musician Wren, Cyphorhinus arada (Aves, Troglodytidae), reveals the existence of six valid species endemic to the Amazon basin. Zootaxa 4193: 541–564.

 

page 379, Slender-billed Greenbul Stelgidillas gracilirostris

Revise the range description of nominate gracilirostris from “Guinea to extreme s Sudan, w Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya and Angola” to “southwestern Senegal and Guinea to extreme southern South Sudan, central Uganda, and western Kenya, south to northern Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 381, Red-tailed Bristlebill Bleda syndactylus

Revise the range description of subspecies woosnami from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia” to “eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya to northern Angola and extreme northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 382, Lesser Bristlebill Bleda notatus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Lesser Bristlebill (Yellow-eyed) Bleda notatus ugandae from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan and Uganda” to “Democratic Republic of the Congo (except along lower Congo River) to southern Central African Republic, southwestern South Sudan, and Uganda”.

 

page 380, Simple Greenbul Chlorocichla simplex

Revise the range description from “Guinea-Bissau to ne Angola, e Democratic Republic of the Congo and extreme s Sudan” to “Guinea-Bissau east to southern South Sudan and western Uganda, south to northern Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 380, Joyful Greenbul Chlorocichla laetissima

Revise the range description of nominate laetissima from “Montane forests of e Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, Uganda and nw Kenya” to “montane forests of northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, western Uganda, and southwestern Kenya”.

 

page 380, Honeyguide Greenbul Baeopogon indicator

Revise the range description of nominate indicator from “S Nigeria to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya and nw Zambia” to “Nigeria to southern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya, south to northern Angola, southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and extreme northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 380, Sjostedt’s Greenbul Baeopogon clamans

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Keith et al. 1992, Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Borrow and Demey 2001), change the English name of Baeopogon clamans from Sjostedt’s Greenbul to Sjöstedt’s Greenbul.

References:

Borrow, N., and R. Demey. 2001. A guide to birds of western Africa. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 380, Yellow-throated Greenbul Atimastillas flavicollis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Yellow-throated Greenbul (soror) Atimastillas flavicollis soror from “N-central Cameroon east to Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and Ethiopia” to “north central Cameroon east to southwestern South Sudan, south to Congo and central Democratic Republic of the Congo; eastern South Sudan and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 379, Plain Greenbul Eurillas curvirostris

Change the names of the monotypic group Plain Greenbul (leoninus) Eurillas curvirostris leoninus to Plain Greenbul (leonina) Eurillas curvirostris leonina (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Plain Greenbul (curvirostris) Eurillas curvirostris curvirostris from “S Ghana to n Angola, s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya; Bioko” to “southern Ghana east to southern South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya, south to northern Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo; Bioko”.

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 380, Leaf-love Phyllastrephus scandens

Revise the range description of subspecies orientalis from “S Cameroon to s Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and extreme w Tanzania” to “Cameroon east to southern South Sudan, south to southern Congo, western and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and extreme western Tanzania”.

 

page 380, Northern Brownbul Phyllastrephus strepitans

Revise the range description from “Extreme s Sudan to n Uganda, s Ethiopia, Kenya and e Tanzania” to “southwestern Sudan; southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia and southern Somalia to northern Uganda, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 381, Toro Olive-Greenbul Phyllastrephus hypochloris

Revise the range description from “Forests of ne Democratic Republic of the Congo to extreme se Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, extreme western Kenya, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 380, Cabanis’s Greenbul Phyllastrephus cabanisi

Revise the range description of subspecies sucosus from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to Rwanda, s Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo to extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, wester Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 381, White-throated Greenbul Phyllastrephus albigularis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group White-throated Greenbul (White-throated) Phyllastrephus albigularis albigularis from “SW Senegal to Cameroon, Gabon, s Sudan and Uganda” to “southwestern Senegal east to extreme southern South Sudan and Uganda, south to southern Congo and western, northern, and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

pages 376-377, Common Bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus

Revise the range description of subspecies arsinoe from “E Chad to Egypt and Sudan (s to Darfur, Kordofan, Nile Valley)” to “Egypt (Nile Valley), eastern Chad, Sudan, and northern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies schoanus from “Eritrea and e Ethiopia to extreme se Sudan (Boma Hills)” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, and southeastern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies tricolor from “E Cameroon to Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Angola, Namibia and Zambia” to “eastern Cameroon east to South Sudan and central Kenya, south to northern Namibia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, northwestern Botswana, and northern and western Zambia”.

 

page 383, bulbuls genus Iole

The sequence of species of Iole bulbuls is revised, based on Manawatthana et al. (2017). The new sequence of species is:

Sulphur-bellied Bulbul Iole palawanensis

Buff-vented Bulbul Iole crypta

Charlotte’s Bulbul Iole charlottae

Gray-eyed Bulbul Iole propinqua

Cachar Bulbul Iole cacharensis

Olive Bulbul Iole viridescens

Yellow-browed Bulbul Iole indica

Reference:

Manawatthana, S., P. Laosinchai, N. Onparn, W.Y. Brockleman, and P.D. Round. 2017. Phylogeography of bulbuls in the genus Iole (Aves: Pycnonotidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 120: 931-944.

 

page 383, Gray-eyed Bulbul Iole propinqua

page 383, Olive Bulbul Iole virescens

The correct species name of Olive Bulbul is Iole viridescens, not Iole virescens (Rand and Deignan 1960, Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

A population in Myanmar, previously classified as a subspecies of Olive Bulbul (Iole viredescens myitkyinensis), instead is embedded within Gray-eyed Bulbul. Transfer myitkyinensis to Gray-eyed Bulbul; position it immediately following the species heading for Gray-eyed Bulbul; and change the scientific name from Iole viredescens myitkyinensis to Iole propinqua myitkyinensis.

Two other subspecies of Gray-eyed Bulbul, lekahuni and cinnamomeiventris, in turn are reassigned to Olive Bulbul Iole viridescens. Change the scientific name from Iole propinqua lekhakuni to Iole viridescens lekhakuni. Revise the range description from “S Myanmar to sw Thailand” to “southern Myanmar to western Thailand”.

Change the scientific name from Iole propinqua cinnamomeoventris to Iole viridescens cinnamomeoventris. Revise the range description of subspecies cinnamomeoventris from “Malay Pen. (Mergui District and Isthmus of Kra to Trang)” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula (Mergui District and Isthmus of Kra south at least to Songkhla)”. We recognize cinnamomeiventris as a new monotypic group, Olive Bulbul (Baker’s) Iole viridescens cinnamomeoventris.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Rand, A.L., and H.G. Deignan.1960. Family Pycnonotidae. Pages 221-300 in E. Mayr and J.C. Greenway, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume IX. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 384, Ashy Bulbul Hemixos flavala

The polytypic group Ashy Bulbul (Cinereous) Hemixos flavala cinereus/connectens now is recognized as two separate monotypic groups, Ashy Bulbul (Cinereous) Hemixos flavala cinereus and Ashy Bulbul (Green-winged) Hemixos flavala connectens.

Revise the range description of cinereus from “Malay Peninsula and Sumatra” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula (north to southern Surat Thani) and Sumatra”.

 

page 385, Firecrest Regulus ignicapilla

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Firecrest (European) from Regulus ignicapilla ignicapilla/balearica to Regulus ignicapilla ignicapilla/balearicus.

Correct the spelling of the subspecies name balearica to balearicus.

 

page 435, Northern Crombec Sylvietta brachyura

Revise the range description of subspecies leucopsis from “S Eritrea to Ethiopia, se Sudan, Somalia, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southern Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 428, Moustached Grass-Warbler Melocichla mentalis

Revise the range description of subspecies amauroura from “S Sudan to sw Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia” to “South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia south to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western and central Kenya, western Tanzania, and northern and central Zambia”.

 

page 436, Yellow Longbill Macrosphenus flavicans

Revise the range description of subspecies hypochondriacus from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to Uganda, Central African Rep. and extreme sw Sudan” to “southeastern Central African Republic, southwestern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 436, Green Hylia Hylia prasina

Revise the range description of nominate prasina from “Senegambia to Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “Senegambia east to southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania, south to central Angola and central Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

pages 419, 425-426, 432-433, 435, 440-441, 471-472, Bush-Warblers and Allies Cettiidae

Change the English name of the family Cettiidae from Bush-Warblers and Allies to Bush Warblers and Allies. Change the scientific name of this family from Cettiidae to Scotocercidae (Dickinson and Christidis 2014: 641).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 419, Scrub Warbler Scotocerca inquieta

Revise the range description of subspecies grisea from “W Saudi Arabia (Taif Plateau), e South Yemen and Oman” to “western Saudi Arabia, eastern Yemen, and Oman”.

Revise the range description of subspecies buryi from “SW Saudi Arabia, North Yemen and Hadramaut” to “southwestern Saudi Arabia and western Yemen”.

 

page 425, Pale-footed Bush-Warbler Urosphena pallidipes

Bush-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as this group name is shared by species in five different, unrelated genera (Urosphena, Cettia, Horornis, Locustella, and Elaphrornis). Therefore change the English name of Urosphena pallidipes from Pale-footed Bush-Warbler to Pale-footed Bush Warbler.

 

page 426, Chestnut-crowned Bush-Warbler Cettia major

page 426, Gray-sided Bush-Warbler Cettia brunnifrons

Bush-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as this group name is shared by species in five different, unrelated genera (Urosphena, Cettia, Horornis, Locustella, and Elaphrornis). Therefore change the English name of Cettia major from Chestnut-crowned Bush-Warbler to Chestnut-crowned Bush Warbler.

Change the English name of Cettia brunnifrons from Gray-sided Bush-Warbler to Gray-sided Bush Warbler.

 

page 425, Philippine Bush-Warbler Horornis seebohmi

page 425, Japanese Bush-Warbler Horornis diphone

page 425, Manchurian Bush-Warbler Horornis borealis

page 426, Palau Bush-Warbler Horornis annae

page 426, Tanimbar Bush-Warbler Horornis carolinae

page 426, Fiji Bush-Warbler Horornis ruficapilla

page 426, Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler Horornis fortipes

page 426, Hume’s Bush-Warbler Horornis brunnescens

page 426, Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler Horornis acanthizoides

page 426, Sunda Bush-Warbler Horornis vulcanius

page 426, Aberrant Bush-Warbler Horornis flavolivaceus

Bush-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as this group name is shared by species in five different, unrelated genera (Urosphena, Cettia, Horornis, Locustella, and Elaphrornis). Therefore change the English group name of all species of “Bush-Warbler” in Horornis to “Bush Warbler”.

 

page 426, Aberrant Bush-Warbler Horornis flavolivaceus

Subspecies dulcivox, with range “S China (s Sichuan to s Yunnan)”, is deleted. This subspecies is known with certainty from only a single specimen, which was destroyed during the Second World War (Vaurie 1959). Delacour (1943) suggested that dulcivox is a junior synonmy of intricatus, but since its identity no longer can be confirmed, Dickinson and Christidis (2014) remark that it is “best considered unidentifiable”. We delete subspecies dulcivox. Revise the range description of intricatus from “NE Myanmar to nw Thailand and sw China (s Shanxi, e Sichuan)” to “northern and eastern Myanmar and southwestern China (east to southern Shanxi)”.

References:

Delacour, J. 1943. The bush-warblers of the genera Cettia and Bradypterus, with notes on allied genera and species. Part II. Ibis 85: 27-40.

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Vaurie, C. 1959. The birds of the Palearctic fauna. Passeriformes. H.F. & G. Witherby Limited, London.

 

page 436, Brown Woodland-Warbler Phylloscopus umbrovirens

Revise the range description of subspecies mackenzianus from “S Sudan to e Uganda and central Kenya” to “southern South Sudan, northern and eastern Uganda, and central Kenya”.

 

page 437, Common Chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita

The monotypic group Common Chiffchaff (collybita) Phylloscopus collybita collybita is expanded to encompass the monotypic group Common Chiffchaff (Scandinavian) Phylloscopus collybita abietinus (which therefore is no longer recognized as a group), and three additional subspecies (brevirostris, caucasicus, and menzbieri) that previously had not been assigned to any group. Change the scientific name of the group Phylloscopus collybita collybita to Phylloscopus collybita [collybita Group], and change the English name of this group from Common Chiffchaff (collybita) to Common Chiffchaff (Common).

 

page 438, Western Crowned Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus occipitalis

In accord with current usage (Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012), change the English name of Phylloscopus occipitalis from Western Crowned Leaf Warbler to Western Crowned Warbler.

References:

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 438, Eastern Crowned Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus coronatus

In accord with current usage (Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Brazil 2009), change the English name of Phylloscopus coronatus from Eastern Crowned Leaf Warbler to Eastern Crowned Warbler.

References:

Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 439, Lemon-throated Warbler Phylloscopus cebuensis

Change the English name of Phylloscopus cebuensis from Lemon-throated Warbler to Lemon-throated Leaf Warbler (Dickinson et al. 1991, Inskipp et al. 1996, Kennedy et al. 2000).

References:

Dickinson, E.C., R.S. Kennedy, and K.C. Parkes. 1991. The birds of the Philippines. An annotated check-list. British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 12. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Kennedy, R.S., P.C. Gonzales, E.C. Dickinson, H.C. Miranda, Jr., and T.H. Fisher. 2000. A guide to the birds of the Philippines. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 439, Mountain Warbler Phylloscopus trivirgatus

Change the English name of Phylloscopus trivirgatus from Mountain Warbler to Mountain Leaf Warbler (Inskipp et al. 1996, Wells 2007, Eaton et al. 2016).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Phylloscopus trivirgatus [trivirgatus Group] from Mountain Warbler (Mountain) to Mountain Leaf Warbler (Mountain).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Phylloscopus trivirgatus [nigrorum Group] from Mountain Warbler (Philippines) to Mountain Leaf Warbler (Philippines).

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Wells, D.R. 2007. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume Two. Christopher Helm, London.

 

pages 428-432, Reed-Warblers and Allies Acrocephalidae

Change the English name of the family Acrocephalidae from Reed-Warblers and Allies to Reed Warblers and Allies.

 

page 432, Eastern Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida

Revise the range description of nominate pallida from “Egypt; winters to s Sudan and Ethiopia” to “breeds Egypt, south through Western Desert oases the Nile Valley to central Sudan; winters Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia”.

 

page 432, African Yellow-Warbler Iduna natalensis

Revise the range description of subspecies batesi from “Nigeria to n Democratic Republic of the Congo and sw Sudan” to “Nigeria east to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies massaica from “SE Sudan and Ethiopia to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya and s Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan and Ethiopia to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and northwestern and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 432, Mountain Yellow-Warbler Iduna similis

Revise the range description from “Mountains of e Democratic Republic of the Congo to se Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania and n Malawi” to “southern South Sudan, mountains of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, and northern Malawi”.

 

page 429, Black-browed Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps

page 429, Streaked Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus sorghophilus

page 429, Manchurian Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus tangorum

page 430, Blyth’s Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus dumetorum

page 430, Large-billed Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus orinus

page 430, Eurasian Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus

page 430, African Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus baeticatus

page 430, Basra Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus griseldis

page 430, Great Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus arundinaceus

page 430, Oriental Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus orientalis

page 430, Clamorous Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus stentoreus

page 430, Nightingale Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus luscinius

page (addition 2013), Saipan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus hiwae

page 430, Australian Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus australis

page 430, Caroline Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus syrinx

page 430, Aguiguan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus nijoi

page 431, Kiritimati Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus aequinoctialis

page 431, Southern Marquesan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus mendanae

page 430, Pagan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus yamashinae

page 430, Nauru Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus rehsei

page 431, Pitcairn Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus vaughani

page 431, Henderson Island Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus taiti

page 431, Cook Islands Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus kerearako

page 431, Rimitara Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus rimitarae

page (addition 2013), Society Islands Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus musae

page 431, Tahiti Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus caffer

page 431, Moorea Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus longirostris

page 431, Northern Marquesan Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus percernis

page 431, Tuamotu Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus atyphus

page (addition 2013), Mangareva Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus astrolabii

Reed-Warblers do not form a monophyletic group within Acrocephalus; therefore, change the English group name of all species of reed-warblers to “Reed Warbler”.

Additionally, change the English name of the monotypic group Acrocephalus scirpaceus scirpaceus from Eurasian Reed-Warbler (Eurasian) to Eurasian Reed Warbler (Eurasian); and change the English name of the monotypic group Acrocephalus scirpaceus fuscus from Eurasian Reed-Warbler (Caspian) to Eurasian Reed Warbler (Caspian).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Acrocephalus stentoreus stentoreus/levantinus from Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Clamorous) to Clamorous Reed Warbler (Clamorous); and change the English name of the polytypic group Acrocephalus stentoreus [brunnescens Group] from Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Brown) to Clamorous Reed Warbler (Brown).

 

page 430, Eurasian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus

Revise the range description of nominate scirpaceus (Eurasian Reed Warbler) from “NW Africa and Europe to Crimea and Volga R; > w and c Africa” to “breeds Europe (except the Iberian Peninsula) east to western Turkey and western Russia; winters in subSaharan Africa (Senegal east to Sudan, south at least to Gabon and the northern edge of the Congo Basin)”.

Hering et al. (2016) describe a new subspecies, ammon, of Eurasian Reed Warbler, with range “Libyan Desert depressions on the Libya/Egypt border (oases of Qattara, Siwa, Sitra, and Al Jaghbub)”. We recognize this subspecies as a new monotypic group, Eurasian Reed Warbler (Siwa) Acrocephalus scirpaceus ammon.

References:

Hering, J., H. Winkler, and F.D. Steinheimer. 2016. A new subspecies of Eurasian Reed Warbler Acrocephapus scirpaceus in Egypt. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 136: 101-128.

 

page 430, African Reed Warbler Acrocephalus baeticatus                             

Subspecies avicenniae (African Reed Warbler) is more closely related to Eurasian Reed Warbler than to other subspecies of African Reed Warbler (Kennerly and Pearson 2010, Olsson et al. 2016), and so is transferred to Eurasian Reed Warbler. Change the scientific name of this monotypic group from Acrocephalus baeticatus avicenniae to Acrocephalus scirpaceus avicenniae, and change the English name from African Reed-Warbler (Mangrove) to Eurasian Reed Warbler (Mangrove).

Olsson et al. (2016) documented that reed warblers breeding in northwestern Africa and on the Iberian Peninsula, previously included in Eurasian Reed Warbler (Eurasian) Acrocephalus scirpaceus scirpaceus, are genetically distinct from scirpaceus (with high levels of support), and apparently are closely related to African Reed Warbler Acrocephalus baeticatus (although this relationship is less well established). An available name for these birds is ambiguus Brehm 1857. Therefore add subspecies ambiguus, with range “breeds northwestern Africa (Morocco to Tunisia) and southwestern Europe (Iberian Peninsula); Moroccon population at least partially resident, otherwise winters in sub-Saharan Africa, but range not known in detail”, immediately following the heading for African Reed Warbler Acrocephalus baeticatus.

Revise the range description of subspecies cinnamomeus from “Senegal to s Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia south to Mozambique” to “Senegal east to South Sudan, Ethiopia, and southern Somalia, south to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, eastern Zambia, Malawi, and Mozambique”.

Revise the range description of subspecies hallae from “SW Angola to Namibia, sw Botswana, sw Zambia and Malawi” to “southwestern Angola south to western Botswana and western South Africa”.

Revise the range description of nominate baeticatus from “northern Botswana and Zimbabwe southern and southeastern South Africa” to “eastern Botswana and Zimbabwe to southern and southeastern South Africa”.

References:

Kennerly, P., and D. Pearson. 2010. Reed and bush warblers. Christopher Helm, London.

Olsson, U., H. Rguibi-Idrissi, J.L. Copete, J.L. Arroyo Matos, P. Provost, M. Amezian, P. Alström, and F. Jiguet. 2016. Mitochondrial phylogeny of the Eurasian/African reed warbler complex (Acrocephalus, Aves). Disagreement between morphological and molecular evidence and cryptic divergens: a case for resurrecting Calamoherpe ambigua Brehm 1857. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 102: 30-44.

page 431, Lesser Swamp-Warbler Acrocephalus gracilirostris

page 431, Greater Swamp-Warbler Acrocephalus rufescens

page 431, Cape Verde Swamp-Warbler Acrocephalus brevipennis

page 431, Madagascar Swamp-Warbler Acrocephalus newtoni

Swamp-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in two different, unrelated genera (Acrocephalus and Bradypterus). English group name of all species of swamp-warblers to “Swamp Warbler”.

Revise the range description of subspecies jacksoni (Lesser Swamp Warbler) from “S Sudan to w Kenya, Uganda and adjacent Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southern Sudan to western Kenya, Uganda, and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies ansorgei (Greater Swamp Warbler) from “S Sudan to Uganda, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya, n Botswana and nw Angola” to “South Sudan to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Rwanda, and western Kenya south to northwestern Angola, northern Botswana, and northwestern Zimbabwe”.

 

page 430, Clamorous Reed Warbler Acrocephalus stentoreus

Subspecies sumbae, previously classified under Clamorous Reed Warbler Acrocephalus stentoreus, is reassigned to Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis, following Cibois et al. (2011b). Position sumbae immediately following the species heading for Australian Reed Warbler. Acrocephalus australis toxopei, with range “New Guinea, Bismarck Archipelago and Solomon Islands”, is considered to be a junior synonym of sumbae (Watson et al. 1986a, Beehler and Pratt 2016), and is deleted. Revise the range description of sumbae from “Buru I. (s Moluccas) and e Lesser Sundas (Sumba and Timor)” to “Buru (South Moluccas), Sumba and Timor (Lesser Sundas), New Guinea, Bismarck Archipelago, and Solomon Islands”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Cibois, A., J.S. Beadel, G.R. Graves, E. Pasquet, B. Slikas, S.A. Sonsthagen, J.-C. Thibault, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011b. Charting the course of reed-warblers across the Pacific islands. Journal of Biogeographhy 38: 1963–1975.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986a. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 430, Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis

Subspecies carterae, with range “NW Australia”, is considered to be a junior synonym of gouldi (Watson et al. 1986a, Schodde and Mason 1999), and is deleted. Revise the range description of gouldi from “SW Western Australia(Pilbara to Esperance); winters to north” to “breeds western Australia (southwestern Western Australia); winters to northwestern Northern Territory”.

References:

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1999. The directory of Australian birds. Passerines. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra.

Watson, G.E., M.A. Traylor, Jr., and E. Mayr. 1986a. Family Sylviidae, Old World warblers. Pages 3-294 in E. Mayr and G.W. Cottrell (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XI. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page (additon 2013), Mangareva Reed Warbler Acrocephalus astrolabii

Revise the range description from “Mangareva (Gambier Islands); extinct” to “formerly Mangareva, and perhaps other islands, in the Gambier Islands; extinct, no confirmed records since 1838-1839, but may have persisted until the late 19th century” (Cibois et al. 2011a).

Reference:

Cibois, A., J.-C. Thibault, and E. Pasquet. 2011a. Molecular and morphological analysis of Pacific reed warbler specimens of dubious origin, including Acrocephalus luscinius astrolabii. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 131: 32-40.

 

page 442, Spinifex-bird Megalurus carteri

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Schodde and Mason 1999, Christidis and Boles 2008), change the English name of Megalurus carteri from Spinifex-bird to Spinifexbird.

References:

Christidis, L. and W.E. Boles. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1999. The directory of Australian birds. Passerines. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra.

 

page 427, Cinnamon Bracken-Warbler Bradypterus cinnamomeus

Revise the range description of subspecies cavei from “SE Sudan” to “southern South Sudan and northeastern Uganda”.

 

page 428, Brown Emu-tail Bradypterus brunneus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Morris and Hawkins 1998, Sinclair and Langrand 1998), change the English name of Bradypterus brunneus from Brown Emu-tail to Brown Emutail.

References:

Morris, P., and F. Hawkins. 1998. Birds of Madagascar: a photographic guide. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

Sinclair, I., and O. Langrand. 1998. Birds of the Indian Ocean islands: Madagascar, Mauritius, Réunion, Rodrigues, Seychelles and the Comoros. Struik Publishers, Cape Town.

 

page 427, Grauer’s Swamp-Warbler Bradypterus graueri

page 427, Dja River Swamp-Warbler Bradypterus grandis

page 427, White-winged Swamp-Warbler Bradypterus carpalis

Swamp-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in two different, unrelated genera (Acrocephalus and Bradypterus). Therefore change the English group name of all species of swamp-warbler to Swamp Warbler.

 

page 427, Grauer’s Swamp Warbler Bradypterus graueri

Revise the range description of subspecies sudanensis from “S Sudan” to “South Sudan and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 428, Brown Bush-Warbler Locustella luteoventris

page 428, Chinese Bush-Warbler Locustella tacsanowskia

page 427, Long-billed Bush-Warbler Locustella major

page 428, Long-tailed Bush-Warbler Locustella caudata

page 428, Chestnut-backed Bush-Warbler Locustella castanea

page 427, Baikal Bush-Warbler Locustella davidi

page 427, West Himalayan Bush-Warbler Locustella kashmirensis

page 427, Spotted Bush-Warbler Locustella thoracica

page 428, Taiwan Bush-Warbler Locustella alishanensis

page 428, Friendly Bush-Warbler Locustella accentor

page 428, Russet Bush-Warbler Locustella mandelli

page (addition 2015), Sichuan Bush-Warbler Locustella chengi

page 428, Benguet Bush-Warbler Locustella seebohmi

page 428, Javan Bush-Warbler Locustella montis

page 428, Timor Bush-Warbler Locustella timorensis

Bush-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in five different, unrelated genera (Urosphena, Cettia, Horornis, Locustella, and Elaphrornis). Therefore change the English group name of all bush-warblers to Bush Warbler.

 

page 428, Chestnut-backed Bush Warbler Locustella castanea

Change the spelling of the subspecies name muscula to musculus.

 

page 428, Sri Lanka Bush-Warbler Elaphrornis palliseri

Bush-Warblers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in five different, unrelated genera (Urosphena, Cettia, Horornis, Locustella, and Elaphrornis). Therefore change the English name of Elaphrornis palliseri from Sri Lanka Bush-Warbler to Sri Lanka Bush Warbler.

 

page 428, Gray Emu-tail Amphilais seebohmi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Morris and Hawkins 1998, Sinclair and Langrand 1998), change the English name of Amphilais seebohmi from Gray Emu-tail to Gray Emutail.

References:

Morris, P., and F. Hawkins. 1998. Birds of Madagascar: a photographic guide. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

Sinclair, I., and O. Langrand. 1998. Birds of the Indian Ocean islands: Madagascar, Mauritius, Réunion, Rodrigues, Seychelles and the Comoros. Struik Publishers, Cape Town.

 

page 422, Black-collared Apalis Apalis pulchra

Revise the range description of nominate pulchra from “Mts. of se Nigeria and Cameroon; se Sudan to Uganda and Kenya” to “southeastern Nigeria and Cameroon; southern South Sudan, highlands of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southeastern Uganda, and Kenya”.

 

page 423, Yellow-breasted Apalis Apalis flavida

Revise the range description of subspecies flavocincta from “SE Sudan to n Uganda, s Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and extreme northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 423, Buff-throated Apalis Apalis rufogularis

Revise the range description of subspecies nigrescens from “SW Sudan to Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia, ne Angola, Uganda and nw Tanzania” to “extreme southwestern South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, and extreme northwestern Tanzania south to extreme northeastern Angola, and northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 424, Gray Apalis Apalis cinerea

Revise the range description of nominate cinerea from “Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, ne Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 424, Green-backed Camaroptera Camaroptera brachyura

Revise the range description of subspecies abessinica from “S Sudan to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, n Uganda, n Kenya and w Somalia” to “South Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti, northern Somalia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 424, Olive-green Camaroptera Camaroptera chloronota

Revise the range description of subspecies toroensis from “Central African Rep. to sw Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern Central African Republic to southwestern South Sudan, northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 424, Red-fronted Warbler Urorhipis rufifrons

Revise the range description of subspecies smithi from “S Sudan to se Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “South Sudan to southeastern Ethiopia, Somalia, extreme northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 425, Gray Wren-Warbler Calamonastes simplex

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, ne Uganda, ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 422, Red-winged Gray Warbler Drymocichla incana

Revise the range description from “E Nigeria and Cameroon to se Sudan and nw Uganda” to “extreme Nigeria and Cameroon east to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and northwestern Uganda”.

 

page 414, Red-faced Cisticola Cisticola erythrops

Revise the range description of subspecies sylvia from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo and s Sudan to central Tanzania and s Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and southwestern South Sudan to Kenya and central Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies pyrrhomitra from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia” to “southeastern South Sudan and Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies niloticus from “Sudan (upper Blue Nile)” to “southeastern Sudan (upper Blue Nile) and adjacent western Ethiopia”.

 

page 414, Singing Cisticola Cisticola cantans

Revise the range description of subspecies concolor from “N Nigeria to s Sudan” to “northern Nigeria to southern Sudan and South Sudan”.

 

page 415, Rock-loving Cisticola Cisticola aberrans

Revise the range description of subspecies petrophilus from “N Nigeria to w Cameroon, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and sw Sudan” to “northern Nigeria and Cameroon east to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 415, Boran Cisticola Cisticola bodessa

Revise the range description of nominate bodessa from “Juniper woodlands of s Sudan to Eritrea, s Ethiopia and n Kenya” to “northern Eritrea, southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 415, Rattling Cisticola Cisticola chiniana

Revise the range description of subspecies simplex from “S Sudan to n Uganda” to “southern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 415, Ashy Cisticola Cisticola cinereolus

Revise the range description of subspecies schillingsi from “S Ethiopia and extreme se Sudan to n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 415, Red-pate Cisticola Cisticola ruficeps

Revise the range description of nominate ruficeps from “Chad to s Sudan (Kordofan and Bahr-el-Ghazal)” to “Chad, southwestern Sudan, and southwestern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies mongalla from “S Sudan (upper White Nile) to n Uganda” to “south central South Sudan (upper White Nile) and northern Uganda”.

 

page 416, Winding Cisticola Cisticola galactotes

Revise the range description of subspecies zalingei from “N Nigeria to s Sudan (Darfur)” to “northern Nigeria east to southwestern Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies marginatus from “S Sudan (upper White Nile) to n Uganda” to “central Sudan (White Nile Valley), South Sudan, western Ethiopia, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 417, Siffling Cisticola Cisticola brachypterus

Revise the range description of nominate brachypterus from “Gambia to Central African Republic, Sudan, n Democratic Republic of the Congo and n Angola” to “Senegal south to Liberia, east to to Central African Republic, western South Sudan, and northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, south to northern coastal Angola”.

Revise the range description of subspecies hypoxanthus from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo to n Uganda and se Sudan” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 417, Foxy Cisticola Cisticola troglodytes

Revise the range description of nominate troglodytes from “Central African Republic to s Sudan (White Nile) and w Kenya” to “southern Chad, Central African Republic, southern Sudan, South Sudan, and extreme western Kenya”.

Revise the range description of subspecies ferrugineus from “W Ethiopia and adjacent e Sudan (Blue Nile)” to “southeastern Sudan (upper Blue Nile), eastern South Sudan, and adjacent western Ethiopia”.

 

page 417, Tiny Cisticola Cisticola nana

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “Ethiopia, southeastern South Sudan, southwestern, Somalia, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 418, Desert Cisticola Cisticola aridulus

Revise the range description of nominate aridulus from “Mali, Niger and n Nigeria to s Sudan” to “southern Mauritania and Senegal east to Sudan”.

 

page 424, Gray-capped Warbler Eminia lepida

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 428, Black-faced Rufous-Warbler Bathmocercus rufus

Revise the range description of subspecies vulpinus from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to extreme s Sudan, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, extreme Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 432, Buff-bellied Warbler Phyllolais pulchella

Revise the range description from “E Nigeria to Chad, s Sudan, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southwestern Niger and northeastern Nigeria to Sudan, South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Uganda, western Kenya, northern Rwanda, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 420, Graceful Prinia Prinia gracilis

Revise the range description of nominate gracilis from “Nile Valley (Cairo to n Sudan) and n Egypt (El Faiyum)” to “Nile Valley from northern Eygpt to southern Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies carlo from “S Sudan to Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and s Somalia” to “coastal regions of northeastern Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia”.

 

page 421, Tawny-flanked Prinia Prinia subflava

Revise the range description of nominate subflava from “Senegal to s Sudan, adj. Uganda, s-central Ethiopia and s Eritrea” to “Senegal to western and central Ethiopia and northern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies pallescens from “Mali to Sudan, Ethiopia and nw Eritrea” to “Mali to Sudan, northwestern Ethiopia, and western Eritrea”.

 

page 421, Pale Prinia Prinia somalica

Revise the range description of subspecies erlangeri from “SE Sudan to Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya and Somalia” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, central and southern Somalia, northeastern Uganda, and Kenya”.

 

pages 421-422, Red-winged Prinia Prinia erythroptera

Revise the range description of subspecies jodoptera from “Central and s Cameroon to s Sudan” to “central and southern Cameroon to South Sudan”.

 

page 434, Green-backed Eremomela Eremomela canescens

Revise the range description of nominate canescens from “Central African Rep. to Chad, s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “eastern Cameroon, southern Chad and Central African Republic to South Sudan, extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

Revise the range description of subspecies abyssinica from “Eritrea to Ethiopia and Sudan” to “southeastern Sudan, eastern South Sudan, western Eritrea, and western and central Ethiopia”.

 

page 434, Rufous-crowned Eremomela Eremomela badiceps

Revise the range description of subspecies latukae from “S Sudan” to “southern South Sudan”.

 

page 443, Desert Whitethroat Sylvia minula

page 443, Lesser Whitethroat Sylvia curruca

Subspecies Sylvia curruca jaxartica (Lesser Whitethroat), with range “Plains of s Transcaspia”, is considered to be a junior synonym of Desert Whitethroat Sylvia minula (Shirihai et al. 2001), and is deleted. Revise the range description of Desert Whitethroat from “breeds from Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan (and probably Iran) east through northern Afghanistan and Tajikistan to western China; winters to the south” to “breeds from Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and central Iran east through northern Afghanistan and Tajikistan to western China; winters to the south”.

Reference:

Shirihai, H., G. Gargallo, and A.J. Helbig. 2001. Sylvia warblers. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 443, Lesser Whitethroat Sylvia curruca

Subspecies caucasica, with range “Mountains of Balkan Peninsula to w Iran and Caucasus Mountains”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate curruca (Shirihai et al. 2001), and is deleted. Revise the range description of curruca from “W Europe to Caucasus and w Siberia; winters to central Africa” to “breeds Europe east to western Russia (approximately to the Ural Mountains), the Caucasus, Turkey, and western Iran; winters primarily in northeastern Africa, less commonly west to Senegambia”.

Subspecies telengitica, with range “Deserts of Russian Altai to w and s Mongolia”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies halimodendri (Shirihai et al. 2001), and is deleted. Revise the range description of halimodendri from “Plains of lower Volga to e Kazakhstan (Lake Zaysan) and w Altai” to “breeds central Asian steppes, from the lower Ural River and Transcapia east to western Mongolia; primarily winters in southwestern Asia (southeastern Iran to northwestern India), but perhaps also in eastern Africa”.

Reference:

Shirihai, H., G. Gargallo, and A.J. Helbig. 2001. Sylvia warblers. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 443, Wrentit Chamaea fasciata

Add a previously overlooked subspecies, margra Browning 1992, with range “interior of southwestern Oregon”. Insert subspecies margra immediately following the entry for subspecies phaea.

Subspecies intermedia, with range “Chaparral belt of central California (San Francisco region)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate fasciata (Phillips 1986), and is deleted. Revise the range description of fasciata from “Coastal s California (Monterey to San Luis Obispo counties)” to “interior of coastal California from Lake County south to the San Francisco Bay region, then south coastally to San Luis Obispo County”.

Subspecies canicauda, with range “Chaparral belt of nw Baja California”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies henshawi (Phillips 1986), and is deleted. Revise the range description of henshawi from “Chaparral belt of interior s Oregon to s California (San Diego)” to “interior of northern California (inner Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada) and coastal southern California to northwestern Baja California”.

References:

Browning, M.R. 1992. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 105: 414-419.

Phillips, A.R. 1986. The known birds of North and Middle America. Part I. Hirundinidae to Mimidae; Certhiidae. Privately published, Denver, Colorado.

 

page 549, African Yellow White-eye Zosterops senegalensis

Revise the range description of subspecies gerhardi from “S Sudan and ne Uganda border” to “extreme southern South Sudan and northeastern Uganda”.

 

page 550, White-breasted White-eye Zosterops abyssinicus

Revise the range description of subspecies arabs from “S Arabian Peninsula (Yemen and extreme n Aden)” to “southern Arabian Peninsula (southwestern Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and southwestern Oman)”.

Revise the range description of nominate abyssinicus from “Lowlands of Eritrea and e Ethiopia to se Sudan” to “northeastern Sudan, Eritrea, and northern and central Ethiopia”.

 

page 550, Anjouan White-eye Zosterops anjouanensis

Change the spelling of the species name from anjouanensis to anjuanensis (Newton 1877, Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Newton, E. 1877. On a collection of birds from the island of Anjuan. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London [1877] 295-302.

 

page 551, Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Japanese White-eye (simplex/haianus) to Japanese White-eye (simplex/hainanus); and correct the scientific name of this group from Zosterops japonicus simplex/haianus to Zosterops japonicus simplex/hainanus.

 

page 551, Lowland White-eye Zosterops meyeni

Revise the range description of subspecies batanis from “Philippines (Batan, Sabtang, Ivojos, Itbayat and Y’Ami)” to “Lüdao (Green) and Lanyu (Orchid) Islands (southeast of Taiwan) and Batan Islands (Philippines, north of Luzon)”. Reverse the sequence of the two subspecies, so that batanis precedes nominate meyeni.

 

page 553, Cream-throated White-eye Zosterops atriceps

Revise the range description of subspecies atriceps from “N Moluccas (Bacan and Obi)” to “Bacan, north Moluccas”.

 

page 554, Silver-eye Zosterops lateralis

Revise the range description of nominate lateralis from “Tasmania and Flinders I. (Bass Strait)” to “breeds Tasmania and Flinders I. (Bass Strait); winters in coastal eastern Australia. Also colonized New Zealand in the 19th century, now resident throughout New Zealand (colonized ca 1832) and on Norfolk Island (colonized 1904)”.

 

page 449, Chevron-breasted Babbler Sphenocichla roberti

Chevron-breasted Babbler Sphenocichla roberti is transferred to the genus Stachyris, following Moyle et al. (2012); reposition this species to immediately follow Blackish-breasted Babbler Stachyris humei.

Reference:

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651.

 

page 495, Scaly-breasted Illadopsis Illadopsis albipectus

Revise the range description from “NW Angola to Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, w Kenya, nw Tanzania, se Sudan” to “northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southeastern Central African Republic, southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania; northwestern Angola”.

 

page 496, Thrush Babbler Illadopsis turdina

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Thrush Babbler (Thrush) Illadopsis turdina turdina from “S Sudan and ne Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “eastern Central African Republic, extreme southern South Sudan, and adjacent northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 498, Eyebrowed Wren-Babbler Napothera epilepidota

Revise the range description of subspecies granti from “N Malay Peninsula” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula”.

 

page 498, Streaked Wren-Babbler Turdinus brevicaudatus

Revise the range description of subspecies leucostictus from “N Malay Peninsula” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula”.

 

page 503, Rufous Chatterer Turdoides rubiginosa

Revise the range description of nominate rubiginosa from “SE Sudan, Ethiopia, n Uganda and Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, northern Uganda, and Kenya (except southeast)”.

 

page 504, White-rumped Babbler Turdoides leucopygia

Revise the range description of subspecies limbata from “W Eritrea and nw Ethiopia” to “extreme eastern Sudan, western Eritrea, and northwestern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies omoensis from “S and sw Ethiopia to se Sudan” to “southeastern South Sudan and western and southwestern Ethiopia”.

 

page 505, Brown Babbler Turdoides plebejus

Revise the range description of subspecies cinerea from “SE Nigeria to s Sudan, sw Ethiopia and w Kenya” to “southeastern Nigeria to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwestern Ethiopia, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 491, Chinese Hwamei Garrulax canorus

Revise the range description of nominate canorus from “S China (Yangtze Valley) to Tonkin, n Annam and n Laos” to “central eastern and southeastern China to northern Laos and central Vietnam; introduced to Taiwan (where interbreeds with Taiwan Hwamei) and Hawaiian Islands”.

 

page 491, Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush Ianthocincla treacheri

Revise the range description of subspecies griswoldi from “Highlands of central Borneo (Schwaner and Müller mountains)” to “highlands of central Borneo (Schwaner and Müller mountains); a population in the Meratus Mountains, South Kalimantan, Borneo probably is an undescribed subspecies”.

 

page 505, Chinese Babax Ianthocincla lanceolata

Change the English name of the monotypic group Ianthocincla lanceolata woodi from Chinese Babax (Mount Victoria) to Chinese Babax (Mt. Victoria).

 

page 496, Gray-chested Illadopsis Kakamega poliothorax

Change the English name of Kakamega poliothorax from Gray-chested Illadopsis to Gray-chested Babbler (Fry and Keith 2000).

Reference:

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2000. The birds of Africa. Volume VI. Academic Press, London.

 

page 441, Yellow-bellied Hyliota Hyliota flavigaster

Revise the range description of nominate flavigaster from “Senegal to s Sudan, w Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania” to “Senegambia to Sierra Leone, east to South Sudan, western Ethiopia, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 449, Dusky-brown Flycatcher Muscicapa adusta

Revise the range description of subspecies pumila from “Mountains of s Sudan to Cameroon, Uganda and n Tanzania” to “Cameroon and northwestern Central African Republic; southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Rwanda, western Burundi, western Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 449, Swamp Flycatcher Muscicapa aquatica

Revise the range description of nominate aquatica from “Gambia to sw Sudan and n Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southwestern Mauritania south to Gambia, east Nigeria, northern Cameroon, southern Chad, northern Central African Republic, western South Sudan, and northern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Revise the range description of subspecies infulata from “S Sudan to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya, nw Tanzania and ne Zambia” to “central and eastern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Rwanda, western Burundi, western Kenya, northwestern Tanzania, and northeastern Zambia”.

 

page 449, Boehm’s Flycatcher Bradornis boehmi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Britton 1980, Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Urban et al. 1997), change the English name of Bradornis boehmi from Boehm’s Flycatcher to Böhm’s Flycatcher.

References:

Britton, P.L. (editor). 1980. Birds of east Africa. East Africa Natural History Society, Nairobi.

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry, and S. Keith. 1997. The birds of Africa. Volume V. Academic Press, London.

 

page 449, Dusky-blue Flycatcher Bradornis comitatus

Revise the range description of nominatte comitatus from “Cameroon to nw Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and sw Sudan” to “Cameroon south to northwestern Angola, east to southern Central African Republic, northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southwestern South Sudan, and Uganda”.

 

page 447, Grayish Flycatcher Bradornis microrhynchus

Revise the range description of subspecies neumanni from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, central Somalia, n Kenya and ne Uganda” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, central and southern Somalia, northern Uganda, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 446, Pale Flycatcher Agricola pallidus

Revise the range description of nominate pallidus from “Senegambia to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and w Ethiopia” to “Senegambia to South Sudan and western Ethiopia; also northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, possibly this subspecies (or parvus?)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies parvus from “SW Ethiopia to e Sudan, e Democratic Republic of the Congo and nw Uganda” to “eastern South Sudan, southwestern Ethiopia, and northwestern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies murinus from “Gabon to Congo, Angola, w Kenya, n Botswana, nw Zimbabwe” to “Gabon, Congo, and Angola, east to southeastern South Sudan and western and southern Kenya, south to northeastern Namibia, northern Botswana, western and southern Zambia, and Zimbabwe”.

 

page 449, Ashy Flycatcher Fraseria caerulescens

Revise the range description of subspecies brevicauda from “SE Nigeria to nw Angola, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and Uganda” to “southern Nigeria east to southern South Sudan, Uganda, and extreme western Kenya, south to northwestern Angola and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 446, Silverbird Melaenornis semipartitus

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to n Ethiopia, Uganda. w Kenya and w Tanzania” to “southwestern and southern Sudan, South Sudan, western Ethiopia, eastern Uganda, western Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 447, White-eyed Slaty-Flycatcher Melaenornis fischeri

Revise the range description of nominate fischeri from “Mountains of se Sudan to Uganda, Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 414, Fire-crested Alethe Alethe diademata

Revise the range description of subspecies woosnami from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to sw Sudan, w Uganda and nw Tanzania” to “northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwestern South Sudan, western Uganda, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 458, Red-backed Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas leucophrys

Revise the range description of subspecies leucoptera from “S Sudan to ne Uganda, s Ethiopia, n Somalia and n Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan, central and southern Ethiopia, northwestern Somalia, and northern Kenya”.

Revise the range description of subspecies zambesiana from “S Sudan to e Kenya, n Mozambique and e Zambia” to “extreme southern South Sudan and northern and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo to western Kenya, south to Malawi, northern Mozambique, and eastern Zimbabwe”.

 

page 459, Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis

Subspecies nesiotes, with range “SE Sumatra, Rhio Archipelago, Belitung and Bangka islands”, is considered to be a junior synonym of musicus, and is deleted (Ripley 1964, van Marle and Voous 1988). Revise the range description of musicus from “Thai-Malay Peninsula (perhaps an area of introgression between saularis and musicus?), Sumatra and associated islands (Simeulue, the Batu Islands, Nias, and the Mentawai Islands), and western Java; intergrades with amoenus in central Java” to “Thai-Malay Peninsula (perhaps an area of introgression between saularis and musicus?), Sumatra and associated islands (Simeulue, the Batu Islands, Nias, Mentawai Islands, Riau Archipelago, Belitung, and Bangka), and western Java; intergrades with amoenus in central Java”.

References:

Ripley, S.D. 1964. Subfamily Turdinae, Thrushes. Pages 13-227 in E. Mayr and R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume X. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

van Marle, J.G., and K.H. Voous. 1988. The birds of Sumatra. B.O.U. Check-list number 10. British Ornithologists’ Union, Tring, United Kingdom.

 

page 459, Madagascar Magpie-Robin Copsychus albospecularis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Madagascar Magpie-Robin (Black-bellied) Copsychus albospecularis albospecularis from “N Madagascar” to “northeastern Madagascar (intergrading with inexspectatus in central eastern Madagascar)”.

Change the spelling of the scientific name of the monotypic group Madagascar Magpie-Robin (White-bellied) from Copsychus albospecularis inexpectatus to the correct original spelling, Copsychus albospecularis inexspectatus (Richmond 1897, Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Revise the range description of inexspectatus from “E Madagascar” to “southeastern Madagascar (intergrading with albospecularis in central eastern Madagascar)”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Madagascar Magpie-Robin (White-winged) Copsychus albospecularis picas from “W Madagascar” to “northern, western, and southern Madagascar (Tsaranatana massif south to the Androy region)”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Richmond, C.W. 1897. Catalogue of a collection of birds made by Doctor W. L. Abbott in Madagascar, with descriptions of three new species. Proceedings of the United States National Museum 19: 677-694.

 

page 460, White-rumped Shama Copsychus malabaricus

Subspecies indicus, with range “Nepal to Assam and ne India”; subspecies minor, with range “Hainan (s China)”; and subspecies interpositus, with range “SW China to Myanmar, Thailand, Indochina and Mergui Arch.”, all are considered to be junior synonyms of macrourus Gmelin 1789 (Collar 2005, Wells 2007), a previously overlooked subspecies (Mees 1996), and are deleted. Insert subspecies macrourus immediately following subspecies leggei, with range “Nepal to northeastern India, southwestern China and Hainan Island), Myanmar, Thailand, Indochina (including Con Son Island, southern Vietnam), and the northern Thai-Malay Peninsula; the species also is introduced on Taiwan (subspecies not confirmed, possibly macrourus) and the Hawaiian Islands (probably macrourus)”.

Subspecies mallopercnus, with range “Malay Peninsula, Riau Archipelago and Lingga Archipelago”; subspecies ochroptilus, with range “Anambas Islands (South China Sea)”; subspecies abbotti, with range “Bangka and Belitung islands (off Borneo)”; and subspecies eumesus, with range “Natuna Islands (off Borneo)”, all are considered to be junior synonyms of subspecies tricolor (Ripley 1964, Collar 2005), and are deleted. Revise the range description of subspecies tricolor from “Sumatra, w Java, Banka, Belitung and Karimata islands” to “southern Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Riau and Lingga Archipelagos, Bangka and Belitung islands, Anambas Islands, Natuna Islands, and western Java”.

Subspecies hypolizus Oberholser 1912, previously considered to be a junior synonym of melanurus (Ripley 1964), is recognized, following Eaton et al. (2016). Position hypolizus, with range “Simeulue Island, west coast of Sumatra”, immediately following the heading for the polytypic group White-rumped Shama (Barusan) Copsychus malabaricus [melanurus Group].

Subspecies opisthochrus Oberholser 1912, previously considered to be a junior synonym of melanurus (Ripley 1964), is recognized, following Eaton et al. (2016). Position opisthochrus, with range “Lasia and Babi Islands, west coast of Sumatra; possibly extinct in the wild”, immediately following subspecies hypolizus.

Subspecies opisthopelus, with range “Islands off sw Sumatra”, is considered to be a junior synonym of melanurus (Collar 2005), and is deleted. Revise the range description of melanurus from “Islands off nw Sumatra” to “Nias Island and Mentawai Islands, west coast of Sumatra”.

Revise the range description for subspecies mirabilis from “Prinsen I. (Sunda Strait)” to “Panaitan Island (Sunda Strait); possibly extinct”.

References:

Collar, N.J. 2005. Family Turdidae (thrushes). Pages 514-807 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 10. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Mees, G.F. 1996. Geographical variation in birds of Java. Publications of the Nuttall Ornithological Club number 26. Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Ripley, S.D. 1964. Subfamily Turdinae, Thrushes. Pages 13-227 in E. Mayr and R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume X. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Wells, D.R. 2007. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume Two. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 413, Nilgiri Shortwing Brachypteryx major

Nilgiri Shortwing Brachypteryx major is not a member of the genus Brachypteryx, and is placed in a new genus, Sholicola (Robin et al. 2017). Position Sholicola immediately following Rufous-browed Flycatcher Anthipes solitaris. Change the English name from Nilgiri Shortwing to Nilgiri Blue Robin, and the scientific name from Brachypteryx major to Sholicola major.

Reference:

Robin, V.V., C.K. Vishnudas, P. Gupta, F.E. Rheindt, D.H. Hooper, U. Ramakrishnan, and S. Reddy. 2017. Two new genera of songbirds represent endemic radiations fro the Shola Sky Islands of the Western Ghats, India. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 31.

 

page 413, White-bellied Shortwing Brachypteryx albiventris

White-bellied Shortwing Brachypteryx albiventris is not a member of the genus Brachypteryx, and is placed in a new genus, Sholicola (Robin et al. 2017). Position Sholicola immediately following Rufous-browed Flycatcher Anthipes solitaris. Change the English name from White-bellied Shortwing to White-bellied Blue Robin, and the scientific name from Brachypteryx albiventris to Sholicola albiventris.

With the addition of a new subspecies, revise the range description of nominate albiventris from “Peninsular India (sw Madras to Kerala)” to “southern western Ghats (south of the Palghat Gap) in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, southern India”.

Robin et al. (2017) describe a new species, Sholicola ashambuensis, which we provisionally recognize as a subspecies of White-bellied Blue Robin. Position ashambuensis immediately following nominate albiventris. The range of ashambuensis is “southernmost Western Ghats (Ashambu Hills), southern India”.

Reference:

Robin, V.V., C.K. Vishnudas, P. Gupta, F.E. Rheindt, D.H. Hooper, U. Ramakrishnan, and S. Reddy. 2017. Two new genera of songbirds represent endemic radiations fro the Shola Sky Islands of the Western Ghats, India. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 31.

 

page 453, Timor Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis hyacinthinus

page 453, Rueck’s Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis ruckii

page 453, Hainan Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis hainanus

page 453, White-bellied Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis pallipes

page 453, Pale-chinned Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis poliogenys

page 453, Pale Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis unicolor

page 453, Large Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis magnirostris

page 453, Hill Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis banyumas

page 454, Sunda Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis caerulatus

page 454, Malaysian Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis turcosus

page 454, Palawan Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis lemprieri

page 454, Bornean Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis superbus

page 454, Tickell’s Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae

page 454, Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis rufigastra

page 454, Sulawesi Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis omissus

Blue-Flycatchers are not a monophyletic group, as the name is shared by species in three different, unrelated genera (Elminia, Cyornis, and Ficedula). Therefore change the English group name of all Cyornis blue-flycatchers to blue flycatcher.

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Eaton et al. 2016), change the spelling of the English name of Cyornis ruckii from Rueck’s Blue-Flycatcher to Rück’s Blue Flycatcher

Reference:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 453, Hainan Blue-Flycatcher Cyornis hainanus

With the transfer of subspecies klossi from Blue-throated Flycatcher Cyornis rubeculoides to Hainan Blue Flycatcher, the latter no longer is monotypic; therefore we insert an entry for the nominate subspecies, Cyornis hainanus hainanus, immediately following the species heading.

Subspecies klossi, previously classified as a subspecies of Blue-throated Flycatcher Cyornis rubeculoides, is transferred to Hainan Blue Flycatcher, following Zhang et al. (2015). Position klossi to immediately follow nominate hainanus.

Reference:

Zhang, Z., X. Wang, Y. Huang, U. Olsson, J. Martinez, P. Alström, and F. Lei. 2015. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 94: 232-241.

 

page 452, Island Flycatcher Eumyias panayensis

Change the English name of Eumyias panayensis from Island Flycatcher to Turquoise Flycatcher.

 

page 457, Cape Robin-Chat Cossypha caffra

Revise the range description of subspecies iolaema from “Mts. of extreme s Sudan to Kenya, Zambia and Mozambique” to “extreme southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and Kenya south to Malawi and northern Mozambique”.

 

page 457, Blue-shouldered Robin-Chat Cossypha cyanocampter

Revise the range description of subspecies bartteloti from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 457, Gray-winged Robin-Chat Cossypha polioptera

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Gray-winged Robin-Chat (Gray-winged) Cossypha polioptera polioptera from “S Sudan to Uganda, nw Tanzania, n Angola and nw Zambia” to “southern South Sudan, eastern and southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, northwestern Tanzania, northern Angola, and northwestern Zambia”.

 

page 457, Rüppell’s Robin-Chat Cossypha semirufa

Revise the range description of nominate semirufa from “SE Sudan (Boma Hills) to Eritrea, Ethiopia and n Kenya” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia (except central east), southeastern South Sudan

(Boma Hills), and northern Kenya”.

Revise the range description of subspecies donaldsoni from “E and se Ethiopia (Harrar and e Gallaland)” to “central eastern Ethiopia”.

 

page 458, Snowy-crowned Robin-Chat Cossypha niveicapilla

Revise the range description of nominate niveicapilla from “Senegal to s Sudan, sw Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southern Mauritania and Senegal east to to southern South Sudan and western Ethiopia, south to southwestern and northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northwestern and northeastern Angola, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 458, White-crowned Robin-Chat Cossypha albicapillus

Revise the range description of subspecies omoensis from “Extreme se Sudan to sw Ethiopia” to “southeastern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia”.

 

page 458, Spotted Morning-Thrush Cichladusa guttata

Revise the range description of nominate guttata from “S Sudan to w Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo and nw Kenya (w of Lake Turkana)” to “eastern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and northwestern Kenya (west of Lake Turkana)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies intercalans from “SW Ethiopia to Kenya, Tanzania to e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southern Ethiopia to central Kenya and central Tanzania”.

 

page 414, Brown-chested Alethe Pseudalethe poliocephala

Revise the range description of subspecies giloensis from “S Sudan” to “southeastern South Sudan (Imatong Mountains), population in adjacent northeastern Uganda presumably also this subspecies”.

Revise the range description of subspecies carruthersi from “Extreme s Sudan to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and w Kenya” to “southeastern Central African Republic, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 455, Forest Robin Stiphrornis erythrothorax

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Forest Robin (Eastern) Stiphrornis erythrothorax xanthogaster from “E Cameroon to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Uganda and extreme s Sudan” to “southeastern Cameroon south to eastern Gabon, east to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southwestern South Sudan, and western Uganda”.

 

page 456, Siberian Blue Robin Larvivora cyane

Revise the range description of nominate cyane from “S Siberia (Altai Mts. to Sea of Okhotsk); > to Indonesia” to “breeds south central Siberia (and perhaps adjacent northeastern Kazakhastan) and northern Mongolia; the species winters in southern China, Indochina, the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, but the nonbreeding distributions of the two subspecies are not well differentiated”.

Revise the range description of subspecies bochaiensis from “breeds eastern Siberia to northeastern China, Korea and Japan; winters to Indochina, Thai-Malay Peninsula, and Borneo, possibly also the Greater Sundas” to “breeds eastern Siberia to northeastern China, Korea and Japan; the species winters in southern China, Indochina, the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, but the nonbreeding distributions of the two subspecies are not well differentiated”.

 

page 402, Chestnut-winged Whistling-Thrush Myophonus castaneus

Change the English name of Myophonus castaneus from Chestnut-winged Whistling-Thrush to Sumatran Whistling-Thrush (Eaton et al. 2016).

Reference:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 461, White-crowned Forktail Enicurus leschenaulti

With the recognition of the nominate subspecies as a new monotypic group, change the scientific name of the group White-crowned Forktail (White-crowned) from Enicurus leschenaulti [leschenaulti Group] to Enicurus leschenaulti [frontalis Group].

 

page 461, White-tailed Robin Cinclidium leucurum

Change the scientific name of White-tailed Robin from Cinclidium leucurum to Myiomela leucura (Zuccon and Ericson 2010).

Change the spelling of the subspecies name cambodianum to cambodiana.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., and P.G.P. Ericson. 2010. A multi-gene phylogeny disentangles the chat-flycatcher complex (Aves: Muscicapidae). Zoologica Scripta 39: 213–224.

 

page 461, Sunda Robin Cinclidium diana

Change the scientific name of Sunda Robin from Cinclidium diana to Myiomela diana (Zuccon and Ericson 2010).

Change the spelling of the subspecies name sumatranu to sumatrana.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., and P.G.P. Ericson. 2010. A multi-gene phylogeny disentangles the chat-flycatcher complex (Aves: Muscicapidae). Zoologica Scripta 39: 213–224.

 

page 454, Pygmy Blue-Flycatcher Ficedula hodgsoni

Change the English name of Ficedula hodgsoni from Pygmy Blue-Flycatcher to Pygmy Flycatcher (Eaton et al. 2016).

Reference:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 451, Russet-tailed Flycatcher Ficedula crypta

Change the English name of Ficedula crypta from Russet-tailed Flycatcher to Cryptic Flycatcher, to conform to widespread usage (Sibley and Monroe 1990, Dickinson et al. 1991, Kennedy et al. 2000).

References:

Dickinson, E.C., R.S. Kennedy, and K.C. Parkes. 1991. The birds of the Philippines. An annotated check-list. British Ornithologists’ Union Check-list number 12. British Ornithologists’ Union, London.

Kennedy, R.S., P.C. Gonzales, E.C. Dickinson, H.C. Miranda, Jr., and T.H. Fisher. 2000. A guide to the birds of the Philippines. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Sibley, C.G., and B.L. Monroe, Jr. 1990. Distribution and taxonomy of birds of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

page 401, Little Rock-Thrush Monticola rufocinereus

Revise the range description of nominate rufocinereus from “Mts. of se Sudan to Ethiopia, e Uganda, w Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, northern Somalia, southern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies sclateri from “W Saudi Arabia” to “southwestern Arabian Peninsula (southwestern Saudi Arabia and western Yemen)”.

 

page 401, Blue Rock-Thrush Monticola solitarius

Correct English name of the polytypic group Monticola solitarius solitarius/longirostris from Blue Rock-Thrush (solitarius Group) to Blue Rock-Thrush (solitarius/longirostris).

 

page 462, African Stonechat Saxicola torquatus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group African Stonechat (Ethiopian) Saxicola torquatus albofasciatus from “Highlands of Ethiopia, se Sudan and ne Uganda” to “western and central Ethiopia, southeastern South Sudan, and northeastern Uganda”.

 

page 465, Sooty Chat Myrmecocichla nigra

Revise the range description from “Nigeria to Angola, extreme s Sudan, Tanzania and Zambia” to “patchily distributed from southeastern Nigeria to south to southern Angola and southern Zambia, east to southern South Sudan, southwestern Kenya, and eastern Tanzania”.

 

page 465, White-fronted Black-Chat Myrmecocichla albifrons

Revise the range description of subspecies clericalis from “S Sudan (west of the Nile) to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and n Uganda” to “South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 466, Mocking Cliff-Chat Thamnolaea cinnamomeiventris

Revise the range description of subspecies subrufipennis from “Extreme se Sudan to sw Ethiopia, Zambia and Malawi” to “southeastern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia south to Zambia and Malawi”.

 

page 465, Familiar Chat Cercomela familiaris

Revise the range description of subspecies falkensteini from “Ghana to sw Sudan, n Ethiopia, Uganda and Kenya” to “southeastern Senegal and northern Guinea east to southern Sudan, western South Sudan, northwestern Ethiopia, southern Uganda, and Tanzania, south to the Zambezi Valley”.

Revise the range description of subspecies omoensis from “SE Sudan (Boma Hills) to sw Ethiopia” to “southeastern South Sudan, southwestern Ethiopia, northeastern Uganda, and

northwestern Kenya”.

 

page 401, Rufous Flycatcher-Thrush Neocossyphus fraseri

Revise the range description of subspecies rubicundus from “Nigeria to Central African Republic, w Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon and Angola” to “southeastern Nigeria east to Central African Republic, south to northern Angola and northwestern Zambia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies vulpinus from “S Sudan to Uganda, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, nw Zambia and nw Tanzania” to “southwestern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda”.

 

page 403, Spotted Ground-Thrush Geokichla guttata

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Spotted Ground-Thrush (Lotti) Geokichla guttata maxis from “S Sudan” to “southern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Spotted Ground-Thrush (Congo)

Geokichla guttata lippensi from “Coastal e Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (Upemba National Park)”.

 

page 403, Abyssinian Ground-Thrush Geokichla piaggiae

Revise the range description of nominate piaggiae from “Ethiopia to se Sudan, n Kenya, sw Uganda and mts. of e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, eastern Uganda, and northern and western Kenya”.

 

page 406, Spotted Nightingale-Thrush Catharus dryas

Subspecies harrisoni, with range “Highlands of se Mexico (Oaxaca)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of ovandensis (Collar 2005), and is deleted. Revise the range of ovandensis from “Highlands of s Mexico (Chiapas)” to “highlands of southern Mexico (southeastern Oaxaca and Chiapas)”.

Revise the range description of nominate dryas from “W Guatemala (Sierra de las Minas) to Honduras; w Ecuador” to “highlands of Guatemala, Honduras, and northern Nicaragua” (Chavarría and Batchelder 2012).

Subspecies ecuadoreanus, with range “Andes of w Ecuador”, is considered to be a junior synonym of maculatus (Collar 2005), and is deleted. Revise the range description of maculatus from “E slope of Andes of Colombia to e Ecuador, e Peru and n Bolivia” to “Andes of Venezuela and of Colombia (except for Pacific slope) and eastern slope of Andes of Ecuador, Peru, and northern Bolivia; western slope of Andes in Ecuador”.

Revise the range description of subspecies blakei from “Andes of extreme n Argentina (Jujuy and Salta)” to “Andes of southern Bolivia (Tarija) and northern Argentina (Jujuy and Salta)”.

References:

Chavarría, L., and R.L. Batchelder. 2012. Seven new records for Nicaragua and range extensions for two additional species. Cotinga 34: 28–32.

Collar, N.J. 2005. Family Turdidae (thrushes). Pages 514-807 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 10. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 407, Abyssinian Thrush Turdus abyssinicus

Revise the range description of nominate abyssinicus from “Highlands of Ethiopia, se Sudan, n Uganda, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, southeastern South Sudan, northern Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 408, African Thrush Turdus pelios

Revise the range description of nominate pelios from “E Cameroon to Chad, s Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia” to “eastern Cameroon to southern Chad, southern Sudan, South Sudan (except extreme south), Eritrea, and northern and central Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies centralis from “N Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, sw Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southern Central African Republic and eastern Congo to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 409, Island Thrush Turdus poliocephalus

The name carbonarius is preoccupied in Turdus; change the scientific name of the monotypic group Island Thrush (Ashy) from Turdus poliocephalus carbonarius to Turdus poliocephalus erebus (Mayr and Gilliard 1952, Beehler and Pratt 2016).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Turdus poliocephalus poliocephalus from Island Thrush (Norfolk Island) to Island Thrush (Norfolk I.).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Turdus poliocephalus vinitinctus from Island Thrush (Lord Howe Island) to Island Thrush (Lord Howe I.).

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Mayr, E., and E.T. Gilliard. 1952. Six new subspecies of birds from the highlands of New Guinea. American Museum Novitates number 1577.

 

pages 411-412, Black-billed Thrush Turdus ignobilis

With the recognition of Turdus ignobilis murinus as a new monotypic group, change the scientific name of the polytypic group Black-billed Thrush (Drab) from Turdus ignobilis [ignobilis Group] to Turdus ignobilis ignobilis/goodfellowi.

Subspecies murinus is removed from the group Black-billed Thrush (Drab), and is recognized as a new monotypic group, Black-billed Thrush (Pantepui) Turdus ignobilis murinus.

 

page 399, Le Conte’s Thrasher Toxostoma lecontei

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), change the English name of Toxostoma lecontei from Le Conte’s Thrasher to LeConte’s Thrasher, “to conform to the generally accepted spelling of the name of entomologist John Lawrence LeConte, for whom the species was named (Mearns and Mearns 1992, Jobling 2010)” (Chesser et al. 2017).

Change the English of the polytypic group Toxostoma lecontei lecontei/macmillanorum from Le Conte’s Thrasher (Le Conte’s) to LeConte’s Thrasher (LeConte’s).

Change the English of the monotypic group Toxostoma lecontei arenicola from Le Conte’s Thrasher (Vizcaino) to LeConte’s Thrasher (Vizcaino).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Jobling, J.A. 2010.  The Helm dictionary of scientific bird names. Christopher Helm, London, United Kingdom.

Mearns, B., and R. Mearns. 1992. Audubon to Xantus: the lives of those commemorated in North American bird names. Academic Press, New York, New York.

 

page 598, Black-winged Starling Acridotheres melanopterus

With the addition of two additional subspecies, revise the range description of nominate melanopterus from “Lowlands of Java, Bali and Lombok” to “western and central Java and Madura”.

Add two previously overlooked subspecies of Black-winged Starling: subspecies tricolor, with range “eastern Java”; and subspecies tertius, with range “Bali, Nusa Penida, and Lombok” (Amadon 1962).

Reference:

Amadon, D. 1962. Family Sturnidae, starlings. Pages 75-121 in E. Mayr and J.C. Greenway, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XV. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 601, Waller’s Starling Onychognathus walleri

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Waller’s Starling (Albertine) Onychognathus walleri elgonensis from “Kenya (west of Rift Valley) to Uganda, se Sudan and e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, western and eastern (Mt. Elgon) Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and Kenya (west of the Rift Valley)”.

 

page 601, Bristle-crowned Starling Onychognathus salvadorii

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to ne Uganda, s Ethiopia, Somalia and n Kenya” to “central Ethiopia, northwestern and southern Somalia, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 601, Sharpe’s Starling Pholia sharpii

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to Ethiopia, n Tanzania, w Uganda, Rwanda and e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “patchily distributed in Ethiopia, southeastern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and Tanzania”.

 

page 601, Stuhlmann’s Starling Poeoptera stuhlmanni

Revise the range description from “Mts. of s Ethiopia to s Sudan, Uganda, Tanzania and e Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “patchily distributed in southwestern Ethiopia, southern South Sudan (Imatong Mountains), eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and western Tanzania”.

 

page 600, Shelley’s Starling Lamprotornis shelleyi

Revise the range description from “Acacia of Somalia and s Ethiopia to se Sudan and se Kenya” to “breeds southeastern South Sudan, southern and eastern Ethiopia, and northern Somalia; partial resident, but as nonbreeder withdraws from Somalia and northeastern Ethiopia, disperses south to southern Somalia, Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 600, Rüppell’s Starling Lamprotornis purpuroptera

Revise the range description of subspecies aeneocephalus from “Eritrea, Sudan and n Ethiopia” to “southeastern Sudan, South Sudan, northwestern Eritrea, and western Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of nominate purpuroptera from “S Ethiopia to Somalia, s Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya and Tanzania” to “central and southern Ethiopia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, southern Somalia, Rwanda, Burudni, and northern and western Tanzania”.

 

page 600, Long-tailed Glossy Starling Lamprotornis caudatus

Revise the range description from “Savanna of Senegal to s Sudan (Nile River region)” to “extreme southern Mauritania to northern Guinea east to southern Sudan and northwestern South Sudan”.

 

page 600, Superb Starling Lamprotornis superbus

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan and Ethiopia to Somalia, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, northern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 599, Lesser Blue-eared Starling Lamprotornis chloropterus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Lesser Blue-eared Starling (Lesser) Lamprotornis chloropterus chloropterus from “Senegal to s Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, n Uganda and w Kenya” to “Senegambia east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, estern Ethiopia, northern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 600, Bronze-tailed Starling Lamprotornis chalcurus

Revise the range description of subspecies emini from “E Cameroon to s Sudan and w Kenya” to “eastern Cameroon to southwestern Sudan, South Sudan, extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and extreme western Kenya”.

 

page 386, Orange-bellied Leafbird Chloropsis hardwickii

Revise the range description of nominate hardwickii from “E Himalayas to sw China, Myanmar, n Thailand and n Vietnam” to “eastern Himalayas to southwestern China (southeastern Tibet, Yunnan), Myanmar, northwestern Thailand, and northern Laos”.

Revise the range description of subspecies melliana from “S China (Guangxi, Fujian and Guangdong) to n Vietnam” to “southeastern China (Guizhou and Guangx east to Zheijang) to central Laos and central Vietnam”.

 

page 535, Western Violet-backed Sunbird Anthreptes longuemarei

Revise the range description of subspecies haussarum from “Liberia to n Cameroon, s Sudan, n Uganda; vagrant to w Kenya” to “eastern Guinea and Liberia to northern Cameroon, extreme southwestern Sudan, South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northwestern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 535, Kenya Violet-backed Sunbird Anthreptes orientalis

Revise the range description from “Somalia to se Sudan, Ethiopia, n Uganda, Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern and eastern Ethiopia, northwestern and southern Somalia, northern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 535, Seimund’s Sunbird Anthreptes seimundi

Revise the range description of subspecies minor from “Nigeria to Cameroon, n Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Rwanda, Uganda” to “southern Nigeria and southern Cameroon east to Central African Republic, southern South Sudan, Uganda, and Rwanda, south to northern Angola and central Democtraic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 535, Green Sunbird Anthreptes rectirostris

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Green Sunbird (Gray-throated) Anthreptes rectirostris tephrolaemus from “S Nigeria to Angola, s Sudan, Uganda and w Kenya; Bioko” to “southeastern Benin and southern Nigeria east to southern Central African Republic, southern South Sudan, Uganda, southwestern Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania, south to northern Angola and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo; Bioko”.

 

page 535, Collared Sunbird Hedydipna collaris

Revise the range description of subspecies somereni from “Extreme se Nigeria to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, nw Angola and sw Sudan” to “southeastern Nigeria south to northwestern Angola and east to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo and southwestern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies garguensis from “E Angola to se Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, nw Tanzania and Zambia” to “southeastern South Sudan, extreme southwestern Ehtiopia, eastern and southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, western Tanzania, eastern Angola, and northern Zambia”.

 

page 535, Pygmy Sunbird Hedydipna platura

Revise the range description from “SW Mauritania to n Nigeria, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and n Uganda” to “Mauritania and Senegal east to Sudan, South Sudan, and perhaps locally in western Ethiopia, south to northern Ivory Coast, northern Nigeria, northern Central African Republic, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda; resident in northern part of range, only a breeding visitor to southern portions of range”.

 

page 535, Nile Valley Sunbird Hedydipna metallica

Revise the range description from “N Egypt to Sudan, n Ethiopia, Somalia, sw Arabia, Yemen, Oman” to “breeds Egypt (primarily the Nile Valley) to Sudan, northeastern South Sudan, Eritrea, northern Ethiopia, Djibouti, northwestern Somalia, southwestern Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and southwestern Oman; nonbreeding visitor to northern Egypt (Cairo) and northern eastern Somalia”.

 

page 536, Green-headed Sunbird Cyanomitra verticalis

Revise the range description of subspecies viridisplendens from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, w Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi and ne Zambia” to “western and southern South Sudan and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo to central Kenya, south to northeastern Zambia and northern Malawi”.

Correct the spelling of the scientific name of the polytypic group Green-headed Sunbird (Blue-headed) from Cyanomitra verticalis cyanocephala/boehndorffi to Cyanomitra verticalis cyanocephala/bohndorffi.

 

page 537, Green-throated Sunbird Chalcomitra rubescens

Revise the range description of nominate rubescens from “E Cameroon to n Angola, se Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia” to “central and southern Cameroon south to northern Angola and northwestern Zambia, east to southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 537, Scarlet-chested Sunbird Chalcomitra senegalensis

Revise the range description of subspecies acik from “Cameroon to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cent. African Rep., sw Sudan, nw Uganda” to “northern Cameroon to Central African Republic, southwestern Sudan, western and central South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northwestern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies proteus from “SE Sudan (Boma Hills), Eritrea, Ethiopia and n Kenya” to “southeastern Sudan, southeastern South Sudan (Boma Hills), Eritrea, and Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies lamperti from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to s Sudan, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan (Imatong Mountains, Leboni Forest), Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda (except northwest), southwestern Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 538, Tacazze Sunbird Nectarinia tacazze

Revise the range description of subspecies jacksoni from “Mts. of se Sudan to e Uganda, w Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, northern and eastern Uganda, western Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 538, Malachite Sunbird Nectarinia famosa

Revise the range description of subspecies cupreonitens from “E Democratic Republic of the Congo to se Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi” to “Ethiopia and southeastern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, and northern Malawi”.

 

page 539, Northern Double-collared Sunbird Cinnyris reichenowi

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Northern Double-collared Sunbird (Eastern) Cinnyris reichenowi reichenowi from “Highlands of e Democratic Republic of the Congo to Uganda, se Sudan and w Kenya” to “southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northeastern, eastern and southwestern Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, and Burundi”.

 

page 539, Mariqua Sunbird Cinnyris mariquensis

Revise the range description of subspecies osiris from “Extreme se Sudan to Eritrea, Ethiopia, n Kenya and n Uganda” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, northwestern Somalia, southern South Sudan, northern Uganda and northern Uganda”.

 

page 539, Red-chested Sunbird Cinnyris erythrocercus

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, southwestern Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 539, Tsavo Sunbird Cinnyris tsavoensis

Revise the range description from “S Somalia to s Sudan, Ethiopia, e Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “southern Somalia, eastern Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 540, Palestine Sunbird Cinnyris osea

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Palestine Sunbird (Decorse’s) Cinnyris osea decorsei from “Lake Chad to s Sudan, extreme ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and nw Uganda” to “very patchily distributed in eastern Cameroon, southwestern Chad (Lake Chad), Central African Republic, southwestern Sudan, extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwestern South Sudan, and northwestern Uganda”.

 

page 540, Shining Sunbird Cinnyris habessinicus

Revise the range description of subspecies turkanae from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, sw Somalia, n Kenya and ne Uganda” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, southwestern Somalia, northeastern Uganda, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 540, Splendid Sunbird Cinnyris coccinigastrus

Revise the range description from “Senegal to sw Mali, Gabon, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, sw Sudan and Uganda” to “Senegal to Sierra Leone, east to southern Nigeria, Cameroon, Central African Republic, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and southwestern South Sudan; nonbreeding visitor to northeastern Gabon”.

 

page 367, Western Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava

The polytypic group Western Yellow Wagtail (lutea/flavissima) Motacilla flava lutea/flavissima is partitioned into two separate monotypic groups, Western Yellow Wagtail (flavissima) Motacilla flava flavissima, and Western Yellow Wagtail (lutea) Motacilla flava lutea.

The polytypic group Western Yellow Wagtail (flava/beema) Motacilla flava flava/beema is partitioned into two separate monotypic groups, Western Yellow Wagtail (flava) Motacilla flava flava, and Western Yellow Wagtail (beema) Motacilla flava beema.

The polytypic group Western Yellow Wagtail (Ashy-headed) Motacilla flava [cinereocapilla Group] is partitioned into three separate monotypic groups, Western Yellow Wagtail (iberiae) Motacilla flava iberiae, Western Yellow Wagtail (cinereocapilla) Motacilla flava cinereocapilla, and Western Yellow Wagtail (pygmaea) Motacilla flava pygmaea.

 

page 367, African Pied Wagtail Motacilla aguimp

Revise the range description of subspecies vidua from “Sierra Leone to s Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and South Africa” to “southeastern Senegal and eastern Gambia east to Sierra Leone to southern Mali, southern Chad, eastern Sudan, Ethiopia, and southern Somalia, south to Angloa, northern and eastern Botswana, and eastern South Africa (south to Eastern Cape) ; Nile Valley of southern Egypt and northern Sudan”.

 

page 363, African Pipit Anthus cinnamomeus

Revise the range description of subspecies stabilis from “C and se Sudan” to “central and southeastern Sudan and eastern South Sudan”.

 

page 364, Plain-backed Pipit Anthus leucophrys

Revise the range description of subspecies zenkeri from “S Mali to s Sudan, n Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Uganda, w Kenya and nw Tanzania” to “southern Mali and Guinea to southwestern Sudan and South Sudan south to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, and northwestern Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies omoensis from “Extreme e Sudan and Ethiopia” to “southeastern Sudan, eastern South Sudan, Eritrea, and northern and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 366, Golden Pipit Tmetothylacus tenellus

Revise the range description from “Arid scrub of se Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern and eastern Ethiopia, Somalia, northern Uganda, eastern Kenya, and eastern Tanzania; partially nomadic or migratory”.

 

page 366, Fuelleborn’s Longclaw Macronyx fuelleborni

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Britton 1980, Keith et al. 1992, Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993), change the English name of Macronyx fuelleborni from Fuelleborn’s Longclaw to Fülleborn’s Longclaw.

References:

Britton, P.L. (editor). 1980. Birds of east Africa. East Africa Natural History Society, Nairobi.

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 645, Golden-crowned Warbler Basileuterus culicivorus

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Golden-crowned Warbler (Golden-crowned) from Basileuterus culicivorus [auricapillus Group] to Basileuterus culicivorus [auricapilla Group].

 

page 643, Red Warbler Cardellina rubra

Revise the range description of nominate rubra from “Mts. of w Mexico (Jalisco and Michoacán to Veracruz and Oaxaca)” to “south central Mexico (transvolcanic belt, from Jalisco and Michoacán to Veracruz and northern Oaxaca)”.

Revise the range description of subspecies rowleyi from “S Mexico (mountains of Oaxaca in Lachao Nuevo region)” to “southern Mexico (mountains of Guerrero and southern Oaxaca)”.

 

page 650, Black-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus atropileus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.09), Black-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus atropileus is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the newly described genus Kleinothraupis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus atropileus to Kleinothraupis atropileus. The sequence of species of Kleinothraupis is revised.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Black-capped Hemispingus (Black-capped) from Hemispingus atropileus atropileus to Kleinothraupis atropileus atropileus.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Black-capped Hemispingus (White-browed) from Hemispingus atropileus auricularis to Kleinothraupis atropileus auricularis.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Orange-browed Hemispingus Hemispingus calophrys

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.09), Orange-browed Hemispingus Hemispingus calophrys is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the newly described genus Kleinothraupis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus calophrys to Kleinothraupis calophrys. The sequence of species of Kleinothraupis is revised.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Parodi’s Hemispingus Hemispingus parodii

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.09), Parodi’s Hemispingus Hemispingus parodii is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the newly described genus Kleinothraupis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus parodii to Kleinothraupis parodii. The sequence of species of Kleinothraupis is revised.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 651, Gray-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus reyi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.09), Gray-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus reyi is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the newly described genus Kleinothraupis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus reyi to Kleinothraupis reyi. The sequence of species of Kleinothraupis is revised.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 651, Oleaginous Hemispingus Hemispingus frontalis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.10), Oleaginous Hemispingus Hemispingus frontalis is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the genus Sphenopsis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus frontalis to Sphenopsis frontalis.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name iteratus to iterata.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 651, Black-eared Hemispingus Hemispingus melanotis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.10), Black-eared Hemispingus Hemispingus melanotis is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead it is classified in the genus Sphenopsis (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus melanotis to Sphenopsis melanotis.

Change the spelling of the name of the monotypic group Black-eared Hemispingus (Western) from Hemispingus melanotis ochreaceus to Sphenopsis melanotis ochracea.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

pages 650-651, tanagers genus Thlypopsis

In accord with AOS-SACC, the sequence of species in Thlypopsis is revised, following Burns et al. (2014). The new sequence of species is

Orange-headed Tanager Thlypopsis sordida

Buff-bellied Tanager Thlypopsis inornata

Fulvous-headed Tanager Thlypopsis fulviceps

Chestnut-headed Tanager Thlypopsis pyrrhocoma

Rust-and-yellow Tanager Thlypopsis ruficeps

Superciliaried Hemispingus Thlypopsis superciliaris

Rufous-chested Tanager Thlypopsis ornata

Brown-flanked Tanager Thlypopsis pectoralis

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds.

 

page 651, Chestnut-headed Tanager Pyrrhocoma ruficeps

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.11), Chestnut-headed Tanager is merged into the genus Thlypopsis, on the basis of genetic evidence that it is embedded in that genus (Burns et al. 2014). Because the name ruficeps is preoccupied in Thlypopsis, a new species name is needed as well. Change the scientific name from Pyrrhocoma ruficeps to Thlypopsis pyrrhocoma (Burns et al. 2016).

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Superciliaried Hemispingus Hemispingus superciliaris

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.11), Superciliaried Hemispingus is merged into the genus Thlypopsis, on the basis of genetic evidence that it is embedded in that genus (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus superciliaris to Thlypopsis superciliaris (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Superciliared Hemispingus to follow Rust-and-yellow Thlypopsis ruficeps.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Superciliaried Hemispingus (Yellow-browed) from Hemispingus superciliaris chrysophrys to Thlypopsis superciliaris chrysophrys.

Change the scientific name of the poltytypic group Superciliaried Hemispingus (Superciliaried) from Hemispingus superciliaris [superciliaris Group] to Thlypopsis superciliaris [superciliaris Group].

Change the scientific name of the poltytypic group Superciliaried Hemispingus (White-bellied) from Hemispingus superciliaris leucogastrus/insignis to Thlypopsis superciliaris leucogastra/insignis.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name leucogastrus to leucogastra.

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Plain-tailed Warbling-Finch Poospiza alticola

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Plain-tailed Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza alticola to Microspingus alticola (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Microspingus to immediately follow Brown-flanked Tanager Thlypopsis pectoralis.

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Rusty-browed Warbling-Finch Poospiza erythrophrys

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Rusty-browed Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza erythrophrys to Microspingus erythrophrys (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Buff-throated Warbling-Finch Poopsiza lateralis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Buff-throated Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza lateralis to Microspingus lateralis (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Gray-throated Warbling-Finch Poospiza cabanisi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Gray-throated Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza cabanisi to Microspingus cabanisi (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Ringed Warbling-Finch Poospiza torquata

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Ringed Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza torquata to Microspingus torquatus (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the spelling of the nominate subspecies from torquata to torquatus.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Black-capped Warbling-Finch Poospiza melanoleuca

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Black-capped Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza melanoleuca to Microspingus melanoleucus (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Cinereous Warbling-Finch Poospiza cinerea

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Cinereous Warbling-Finch is removed from Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poopsiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza cinerea to Microspingus cinereus (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Three-striped Hemispingus Hemispingus trifasciatus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.14), Three-striped Hemispingus is removed from Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that the genus Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Hemispingus trifasciatus to Microspingus trifasciatus (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 658, Chestnut-bellied Mountain-Tanager Dubusia castaneoventris

Subspecies peruviana, with range “Andes of e Peru (north to La Libertad)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate casteneoventris, with range “Andes of w Bolivia (La Paz, Cochabamba, w Santa Cruz)” (Remsen 1984), and is deleted; consequently, Chestnut-bellied Mountain-Tanager becomes monophyletic. Revise the range of the species to “east slope of the Andes of Peru (La Libertad to Puno) and Bolivia (La Paz to western Santa Cruz)”.

Reference:

Remsen, J.V., Jr. 1984. Natural history notes on some poorly known Bolivian birds. Part 2. Gerfaut 74: 163-179.

 

page 660, Dotted Tanager Tangara varia

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.19), Dotted Tanager is removed from the genus Tangara, based on genetic evidence that Tangara is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Tangara varia to Ixothraupis varia (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Ixothraupis to follow the genus Thraupis.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 660, Rufous-throated Tanager Tangara rufigula

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.19), Rufous-throated Tanager is removed from the genus Tangara, based on genetic evidence that Tangara is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Tangara rufigula to Ixothraupis rufigula (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 660, Speckled Tanager Tangara guttata

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.19), Speckled Tanager is removed from the genus Tangara, based on genetic evidence that Tangara is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Tangara guttata to Ixothraupis guttata (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 660, Yellow-bellied Tanager Tangara xanthogastra

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.19), Yellow-bellied Tanager is removed from the genus Tangara, based on genetic evidence that Tangara is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Tangara xanthogastra to Ixothraupis xanthogastra (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 660, Spotted Tanager Tangara punctata

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.19), Spotted Tanager is removed from the genus Tangara, based on genetic evidence that Tangara is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Tangara punctata to Ixothraupis punctata (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 648, Giant Conebill  Oreomanes fraseri

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.15), Giant Conebill is transferred to Conirostrum, based on genetic data that the genus Oreomanes is embedded in Conirostrum (Burns et al. 2014). The name fraseri is preoccupied in Conirostrum, however, and so the species name changes to the available name binghami (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name from Oreomanes fraseri to Conirostrum binghami.

Reference:

     Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 648, conebills genus Conirostrum

In accord with AOS-SACC, the sequence of species of conebill (Conirostrum) is revised, based on genetic evidence (Burns et al. 2014). The new sequence of species is

Bicolored Conebill Conirostrum bicolor

Pearly-breasted Conebill Conirostrum margaritae

Chestnut-vented Conebill Conirostrum speciosum

White-eared Conebill Conirostrum leucogenys

Giant Conebill Conirostrum binghami

White-browed Conebill Conirostrum ferrugineiventre

Blue-backed Conebill Conirostrum sitticolor

Capped Conebill Conirostrum albifrons

Tamarugo Conebill Conirostrum tamarugense

Rufous-browed Conebill Conirostrum rufum

Cinereous Conebill Conirostrum cinereum

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 668, White-winged Diuca-Finch Diuca speculifera

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.16, and resulting discussion), White-winged Diuca-Finch is merged into Idiopsar, based on new phylogenetic evidence (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015). Change the scientific name from Diuca speculifera to Idiopsar speculifer.

Change the spelling of the nominate subspecies from speculifera to speculifer.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 667, Plumbeous Sierra-Finch Phrygilus unicolor

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.17), Plumbeous Sierra-Finch and Ash-breasted Sierra-Finch are removed from the genus Phrygilus, and are placed in the genus Geospizopsis, based on genetic data that the genus Phrygilus does not form a monophlyletic group (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015, Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name of Plumbeous Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus unicolor to Geospizopsis unicolor. Because the genus Geospizopsis is most closely related to Haplospiza and related genera (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015), reposition Geospizopsis to immediately precede the genera Haplospiza, Spodiornis, and Acanthidops.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name nivarius to nivaria.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name tucumanus to tucumana.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name ultimus to ultima.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 668, Ash-breasted Sierra-Finch Phrygilus plebejus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.17), Plumbeous Sierra-Finch and Ash-breasted Sierra-Finch are removed from the genus Phrygilus, and are placed in the genus Geospizopsis, based on genetic data that the genus Phrygilus does not form a monophlyletic group (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015). Change the scientific name of Ash-breasted Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus plebejus to Geospizopsis plebejus. Because the genus Geospizopsis is most closely related to Haplospiza and related genera (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015), reposition Geospizopsis to immediately precede the genera Haplospiza, Spodiornis, and Acanthidops.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into

New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 673, Uniform Finch Haplospiza unicolor

Reposition Uniform Finch to precede Slaty Finch Spodiornis rusticus.

 

page 673, Slaty Finch Haplospiza rustica

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.16, and resulting discussion), Slaty Finch is removed from Haplospiza and is placed in the monotypic genus Spodiornis, based on new phylogenetic evidence (Burns et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015). Change the scientific name from Haplospiza rustica to Spodiornis rusticus.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name rustica to rusticus.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name arcana to arcanus.

References:

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348.

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 668, Nightingale Finch Nesospiza acunhae

Change the English name of the monotypic group Nesospiza acunhae acunhae from Nightingale Finch (Inaccessible Island) to Nightingale Finch (Inaccessible I.).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Nesospiza acunhae questi from Nightingale Finch (Nightingale) to Nightingale Finch (Nightingale I.).

 

page 668, Wilkins’s Finch Nesospiza wilkinsi

Change the English name of the monotypic group Nesospiza wilkinsi dunnei from Wilkins’s Finch (Inaccessible Island) to Wilkins’s Finch (Inaccessible I.).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Nesospiza wilkinsi wilkinsi from Wilkins’s Finch (Nightingale Island) to Wilkins’s Finch (Nightingale I.).

 

page 650, Black-headed Hemispingus Hemispingus verticalis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.07), Black-headed Hemispingus and Drab Hemispingus are removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that the genus Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name of Black-headed Hemispingus from Hemispingus verticalis to Pseudospingus verticalis (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Pseudospingus to precede Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris and Bay-chested Warbling-Finch Castanozoster thoracicus.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Drab Hemispingus Hemispingus xanthophthalmus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.07), Black-headed Hemispingus and Drab Hemispingus are removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that the genus Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name of Drab Hemispingus from Hemispingus xanthophthalmus to Pseudospingus xanthophthalmus (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Pseudospingus to precede Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris and Bay-chested Warbling-Finch Castanozoster thoracicus.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris

In accord with AOS-SACC, transfer Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris to a position immediately following Drab Hemispingus Pseudospingus xanthophthalmus, based on genetic evidence that Cnemoscopus and Pseudospingus are sister genera (Burns et al.2014).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 669, Bay-chested Warbling-Finch Poospiza thoracica

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.13), Bay-chested Warbling-Finch is removed from the genus Poospiza, based on genetic evidence that Poospiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Poospiza thoracica to Castanozoster thoracicus (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Slaty-backed Hemispingus Hemispingus goeringi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.08), Slaty-backed Hemispingus is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that the genus Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead, Slaty-backed Hemispingus and Rufous-browed Hemispingus are embedded in Poospiza. Change the scientific name of Slaty-backed Hemispingus from Hemispingus goeringi to Poospiza goeringi (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Slaty-backed Hemispingus to immediately follow Bay-chested Warbling-Finch Castanozoster thoracicus.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 650, Rufous-browed Hemispingus Hemispingus rufosuperciliaris

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.08), Rufous-browed Hemispingus is removed from the genus Hemispingus, based on genetic evidence that the genus Hemispingus is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014); instead, Slaty-backed Hemispingus and Rufous-browed Hemispingus are embedded in Poospiza. Change the scientific name of Rufous-browed Hemispingus from Hemispingus rufosuperciliaris to Poospiza rufosuperciliaris (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Rufous-browed Hemispingus to immediately follow Bay-chested Warbling-Finch Castanozoster thoracicus and Slaty-backed Hemispingus Poospiza goeringi.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Cochabamba Mountain-Finch Compsospiza garleppi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.08), Cochabamba Mountain-Finch is removed from the genus Compsospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Compsospiza is embedded in Poospiza (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name of Cochabamba Mountain-Finch from Compsospiza garleppi to Poospiza garleppi (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition the two species of mountain-finch to immediately follow Collared Warbling-Finch Poospiza hispaniolensis.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 669, Tucuman Mountain-Finch Compsospiza baeri

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.08), Tucuman Mountain-Finch is removed from the genus Compsospiza, based on genetic evidence that the genus Compsospiza is embedded in Poospiza (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name of Tucuman Mountain-Finch from Compsospiza baeri to Poospiza baeri (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition the two species of mountain-finch to immediately follow Collared Warbling-Finch Poospiza hispaniolensis.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354.

 

page 688, Mangrove Finch Camarhynchus heliobates

Revise the range description from “Mangrove swamps of Galapagos Islands (Fernandina and Isabela)” to “restricted to very small area in mangroves on west coast of Isabella (Galapagos Islands); formerly also on eastern coast of Isabela, and on Fernandina Island” (Wiedenfeld 2006).

Reference:

Wiedenfeld, D.A. 2006. Aves, The Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Check List 2: 1-27.

 

page 689, Black-throated Saltator Saltator atricollis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.03), Black-throated Saltator is removed from the genus Saltator and placed in Saltatricula (Burns et al. 2014). Change the scientific name from Saltator atricollis to Saltatricula atricollis.

Reference:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77.

 

page 649, Common Chlorospingus Chlorospingus flavopectus

Revise the range description of subspecies dwighti from “Caribbean slope of s Mexico (Chiapas) and e Guatemala” to “Caribbean slope of southern Mexico (Chiapas) and eastern Guatemala; population in Belize presumably also this subspecies”.

 

page 684, Grasshopper Sparrow Ammodramus savannarum

Previously we recognized three groups in Grasshopper Sparrow: a polytypic group Grasshopper Sparrow (Western) Ammodramus savannarum perpallidus/ammolegus, and two monotypic groups, Grasshopper Sparrow (Eastern) Ammodramus savannarum pratensis and Grasshopper Sparrow (Florida) Ammodramus savannarum floridanus. These three groups are not field identifiable, however, and so are dissolved. We continue to recognize perpallidus, ammolegus, pratensis, and floridanus as subspecies.

 

page 684, Le Conte’s Sparrow Ammodramus leconteii

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), change the English name of Ammodramus leconteii from Le Conte’s Sparrow to LeConte’s Sparrow, “to conform to the generally accepted spelling of the name of entomologist John Lawrence LeConte, for whom the species was named (Mearns and Mearns 1992, Jobling 2010)” (Chesser et al. 2017).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Jobling, J.A. 2010.  The Helm dictionary of scientific bird names. Christopher Helm, London, United Kingdom.

Mearns, B., and R. Mearns. 1992. Audubon to Xantus: the lives of those commemorated in North American bird names. Academic Press, New York, New York.

 

page 685, Song Sparrow Melospiza melodia

Revise the range description of subspecies heermanni from “cistmontane California (Central Valley, Suisan Bay to Mojave, Colorado deserts), coastal Calif (from northern Monterey County to northern Baja)” to “central and southwestern California (including the Central Valley) and northwestern Baja California”.

Revise the range description of subspecies graminea from “Channel Is. (off southern California), Los Coronados Is. (off northwestern Baja California)” to “California Channel Islands (San Clemente, San Miguel, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, Anacapa) off of southern Calfornia and Los Coronados Islands, west of Baja California. Formerly also Santa Barbara Island (Channel Islands), but now extirpated”.

Revise the range description of subspecies fallax from “southern Nevada to southwestern Utah, southeastern Calif to northwestern Baja California, western Mexico (northeastern Sonora)” to “southeastern Nevada and southwestern Utah south to southeastern California, northeastern Baja California, and northeastern Sonora”.

 

pages 665-667, Buntings and New World Sparrows Family Emberizidae

With the removal of the New World species from Emberizidae, change the English name of this family from Buntings and New World Sparrows to Old World Buntings.

 

page 665, Gray-hooded Bunting Emberiza buchanani

In accord with widespread usage (e.g. Inskipp et al. 1996, MacKinnon and Phillipps 2000, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012), change the English name of Emberiza buchanani from Gray-hooded Bunting to Gray-necked Bunting.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth. 1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 665, Cinnamon-breasted Bunting Emberiza tahapisi

Revise the range description of subspecies septemstriata from “Sudan east of the Nile to w and n Ethiopia” to “southeastern Sudan, northeastern South Sudan, Eritrea, and northwestern Ethiopia; possibly a hybrid swarm between nominate tapapsi and Gosling’s Bunting Emberiza goslingi“.

Revise the range description of nominate tahapisi from “Gabon to Uganda, s Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia and South Africa” to “central and southeastern Ethiopia and northern Somalia south to South Africa; Gabon, Angola, and central and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

Following the entry for Emberiza tahapisi tahapisi, insert a previously overlooked subspecies, nivenorum Witterbottom 1965, with range “western Namibia and (presumably) adjacent southwestern Angola”.

Reference:

Winterbottom, J.M. 1964 [1965]. Results of the Percy Fitzpatrick Institute-Windhoek State Museum Joint Ornithological Expeditions: report of the birds of Game Reserve No. 2. Cimbebasia number 9.

 

page 665, Gosling’s Bunting Emberiza goslingi

Revise the range description from “Gambia to Sudan west of the Nile and extreme ne Zaïre” to “southern Mauritania to southern Senegal, east to southeastern Chad, northeastern Central African Republic, southwestern Sudan, and northwestern South Sudan; possibly also extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 666, Golden-breasted Bunting Emberiza flaviventris

Revise the range description of subspecies kalaharica from “S Angola to se Sudan, Kenya, Mozambique and n South Africa” to “southern South Sudan and central and southeastern Angola south to northeastern Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique, and northern South Africa”.

 

page 666, Brown-rumped Bunting Emberiza affinis

Revise the range description of nominate affinis from “S Sudan, n Uganda and adjacent Zaïre” to “South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and northwestern Kenya; population in southeastern Sudan and northwestern Ethiopia presumably also this subspecies”.

 

page 666, Cabanis’s Bunting Emberiza cabanisi

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Cabanis’s Bunting (Cabanis’s) Emberiza cabanisi cabanisi from “Sierra Leone to s Sudan, ne Zaïre and nw Uganda” to “Guinea and Sierra Leone to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northwestern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Cabanis’s Bunting (Three-streaked) Emberiza cabanisi orientalis from “S Zaïre to Tanzania, Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, n Mozambique” to “Gabon east to southern Democratic Republic of the Congo and Tanzania south to Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique”.

 

page 654, Red-crowned Ant-Tanager Habia rubica

Change the subspecies name mesoptamia to the correct original spelling, mesopotamia.

 

page 691, Blue-black Grosbeak Cyanocompsa cyanoides

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 724), change the scientific name of Blue-black Grosbeak from Cyanocompsa cyanoides to Cyanoloxia cyanoides. This change is based on genetic evidence that that Blue-black Grosbeak is more closely related to Glaucous-blue Grosbeak Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea that it is to the type species of Cyanocompsa, Blue Bunting Cyanocompsa parellina (Bryson et al. 2014).

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Blue-black Grosbeak (Blue-black) Cyanocompsa cyanoides [cyanoides Group] to Cyanoloxia cyanoides [cyanoides Group].

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Blue-black Grosbeak (Amazonian) Cyanocompsa cyanoides rothschildii to Cyanoloxia cyanoides rothschildii.

Reference:

Bryson, R.W., Jr., J. Chaives, B.T. Smith, M.J. Miller, K. Winker, J.L. Pérez-Emán, and J. Klicka. 2014. Diversification across the New World within the ‘blue’ caridinalids (Aves: Cardinalidae). Journal of Biogeography 41: 587-599.

 

page 691, Ultramarine Grosbeak Cyanocompsa brissonii

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 724), change the scientific name of Ultramarine Grosbeak from Cyanocompsa brissonii to Cyanoloxia brissonii. This change is based on genetic evidence that that Ultramarine Grosbeak is more closely related to Glaucous-blue Grosbeak Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea that it is to the type species of Cyanocompsa, Blue Bunting Cyanocompsa parellina (Bryson et al. 2014).

Reference:

Bryson, R.W., Jr., J. Chaives, B.T. Smith, M.J. Miller, K. Winker, J.L. Pérez-Emán, and J. Klicka. 2014. Diversification across the New World within the ‘blue’ caridinalids (Aves: Cardinalidae). Journal of Biogeography 41: 587-599.

 

pages 691-698, 701, Troupials and allies Family Icteridae

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the sequence of genera in Icteridae is revised, following Powell et al. (2014). The new sequence of genera is:

Xanthocephalus

Dolichonyx

Sturnella

Amblycercus

Cassiculus

Psarocolius

Cacicus

Icterus

Nesopsar

Agelaius

Molothrus

Dives

Ptiloxena

Euphagus

Quiscalus

Hypopyrrhus

Lampropsar

Gymnomystax

Macroagelaius

Curaeus

Amblyramphus

Anumara

Gnorimopsar

Oreopsar

Agelaioides

Agelasticus

Chrysomus

Xanthopsar

Pseudoleistes

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Powell, A.F.L.A., F.K. Barker, S.M. Lanyon, K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. A comprehensive species-level molecular phylogeny of the New World blackbirds (Icteridae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 71: 94-112.

 

pages 625-639, 701, Finches, Euphonias, and Allies Family Fringillidae

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2017), the sequence of genera and species in Fringillidae is revised, following Arnaiz-Villena et al. (2007, 2008), Nguembock et al. (2009), Lerner et al. (2011), and Zuccon et al. (2012). The new sequence of genera is:

Fringilla

Chlorophonia

Euphonia

Mycerobas

Coccothraustes

Eophona

Melamprosops

Oreomystis

Paroreomyza

Loxioides

Telespiza

Chloridops

Rhodacanthis

Ciridops

Palmeria

Himatione

Drepanis

Psittirostra

Dysmorodrepanis

Pseudonestor

Hemignathus

Akialoa

Magumma

Chlorodrepanis

Viridonia

Loxops

Carpodacus

Pinicola

Pyrrhula

Rhodopechys

Bucanetes

Agraphospiza

Pyrrhoplectes

Callacanthis

Procarduelis

Leucosticte

Haemorhous

Rhodospiza

Rhynchostruthus

Chloris

Linurgus

Crithagra

Linaria

Acanthis

Loxia

Chrysocorythus

Carduelis

Serinus

Spinus

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J.I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., J.D. Rising, D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2017. Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 134: 751-773.

Lerner, H.R.L., M. Meyer, H.F. James, M. Hofreiter, and R.C. Fleischer. 2011. Multilocus resolution of phylogeny and timescale in the extant adaptive radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers. Current Biology 21: 1838-1844.

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet.   2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 638, Scarlet Finch Haematospiza sipahi

Scarlet Finch is transferred from the monotypic genus Haematospiza to Carpodacus, following Zuccon et al. (2012); change the scientific name from Haematospiza sipahi to Carpodacus sipahi.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 701, Bonin Grosbeak Chaunoproctus ferreorostris

Bonin Grosbeak is transferred from the monotypic genus Chaunoproctus to Carpodacus, following Zuccon et al. (2012); change the scientific name from Chaunoproctus ferreorostris to Carpodacus ferreorostris.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 638, Long-tailed Rosefinch Uragus sibiricus

Long-tailed Rosefinch is transferred from the monotypic genus Uragus to Carpodacus, following Zuccon et al. (2012) and Tietze et al. (2013); change the scientific name from Uragus sibiricus to Carpodacus sibiricus.

References:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

Tietze, D.T., M. Päkert, J. Martens, H. Lehmann, and Y-H. Sun. 2013. Complete phylogeny and historical biogeography of true rosefinches (Aves: Carpodacus). Zoological Journal of Linnean Society 169: 215-234.

 

page 629, Crimson-browed Finch Pinicola subhimachala

Crimson-browed Finch is transferred from Pinicola to Carpodacus, following Zuccon et al. (2012) and Tietze et al. (2013); change the scientific name from Pinicola subhimachala to Carpodacus subhimachalus.

References:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

Tietze, D.T., M. Päkert, J. Martens, H. Lehmann, and Y-H. Sun. 2013. Complete phylogeny and historical biogeography of true rosefinches (Aves: Carpodacus). Zoological Journal of Linnean Society 169: 215-234.

 

page 629, Blanford’s Rosefinch Carpodacus rubescens

Blanford’s Rosefinch is not a member of Carpodacus (Zuccon et al. 2012, Tietze et al. 2013), and is transferred to a new genus (Zuccon et al. 2012); change the scientific name from Carpodacus rubescens to Agraphospiza rubescens.

References:

Tietze, D.T., M. Päkert, J. Martens, H. Lehmann, and Y-H. Sun. 2013. Complete phylogeny and historical biogeography of true rosefinches (Aves: Carpodacus). Zoological Journal of Linnean Society 169: 215-234.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 629, Dark-breasted Rosefinch Carpodacus nipalensis

Dark-breasted Rosefinch is not a member of Carpodacus (Zuccon et al. 2012, Tietze et al. 2013), and is transferred to the genus Procarduelis; change the scientific name from Carpodacus nipalensis to Procarduelis nipalensis.

References:

Tietze, D.T., M. Päkert, J. Martens, H. Lehmann, and Y-H. Sun. 2013. Complete phylogeny and historical biogeography of true rosefinches (Aves: Carpodacus). Zoological Journal of Linnean Society 169: 215-234.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 631, European Greenfinch Chloris chloris

Revise the range description of nominate chloris from “British Isles, n Europe, Corsica and Sardinia; winters to s Europe” to “British Isles, n Europe, Corsica and Sardinia; winters to s Europe. The species also now is established in southeastern Australia, Norfolk Island, New Zealand, and South America (northeastern Argentina, Uruguay, and extreme southern Brazil), but subspecific affinities of these feral populations are not known”.

 

page 634, White-rumped Seedeater Serinus leucopygius

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012).

Change the scientific name of White-rumped Seedeater from Serinus leucopygius to Crithagra leucopygia. Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from leucopygius to leucopygia. Revise the range description of the nominate subspecies from “Central and s Sudan to w Eritrea, w Ethiopia and nw Uganda” to “eastern Sudan, northern Eritrea, western and central Ethiopia, South Sudan, extreme northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (north end of Lake Albert), and northwestern Uganda”.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Yellow-fronted Canary Serinus mozambicus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yellow-fronted Canary from Serinus mozambicus to Crithagra mozambica.

Change subspecies name barbatus to barbata. Revise the range description of barbata from “S Chad to Sudan, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya and central Tanzania” to “southern Chad, Central African Republic, western Sudan, western and southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, southwestern Kenya, and central Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies grotei from “S Sudan (east of the Nile) to Eritrea and w Ethiopia” to “southeastern Sudan (east of the Nile), eastern South Sudan, and western and southwestern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies gommaensis from “W Ethiopia (Lake Tana to Gomma)” to “Eritrea and northwestern and central Ethiopia”.

Change the spelling of the nominate subspecies from mozambicus to mozambica.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, African Citril Serinus citrinelloides

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of African Citril from Serinus citrinelloides to Crithagra citrinelloides.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Western Citril Serinus frontalis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Western Citril from Serinus frontalis to Crithagra frontalis.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe.2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Southern Citril Serinus hypostictus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Southern Citril from Serinus hypostictus to Crithagra hyposticta.

Revise the range description of subspecies brittoni from “S Sudan and w Kenya” to “southeastern South Sudan and extreme western Kenya”.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from hypostictus to hyposticta.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of hereCarduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Black-faced Canary Serinus capistratus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Black-faced Canary from Serinus capistratus to Crithagra capistrata.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from capistratus to capistrata.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic

relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Papyrus Canary Serinus koliensis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Papyrus Canary from Serinus koliensis to Crithagra koliensis.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Forest Canary Serinus scotops

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Forest Canary from Serinus scotops to Crithagra scotops.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name umbrosus to umbrosa.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Olive-rumped Serin Serinus rothschildi

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Olive-rumped Serin from Serinus rothschildi to Crithagra rothschildi.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Black-throated Canary Serinus atrogularis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Black-throated Canary from Serinus atrogularis to Crithagra atrogularis.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name impiger to impigra.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Reichenow’s Seedeater Serinus reichenowi

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Reichenow’s Seedeater from Serinus reichenowi to Crithagra reichenowi.

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, Somalia, ne Uganda, Kenya, ne Tanzania” to “Djibouti, Ethiopia, southeastern South Sudan, southern Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Yellow-rumped Serin Serinus xanthopygius

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yellow-rumped Serin from Serinus xanthopygius to Crithagra xanthopygia.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Lemon-breasted Seedeater Serinus citrinipectus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Lemon-breasted Seedeater from Serinus citrinipectus to Crithagra citrinipectus.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, White-bellied Canary Serinus dorsostriatus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of White-bellied Canary from Serinus dorsostriatus to Crithagra dorsostriata.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from dorsostriatus to dorsostriata.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Yellow-throated Serin Serinus flavigula

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yellow-throated Serin from Serinus flavigula to Crithagra flavigula.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Salvadori’s Serin Serinus xantholaemus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Salvadori’s Serin from Serinus xantholaemus to Crithagra xantholaema.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Northern Grosbeak-Canary Serinus donaldsoni

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Northern Grosbeak-Canary from Serinus donaldsoni to Crithagra donaldsoni.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Southern Grosbeak-Canary Serinus buchanani

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Southern Grosbeak-Canary from Serinus buchanani to Crithagra buchanani.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Brimstone Canary Serinus sulphuratus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Brimstone Canary from Serinus sulphuratus to Crithagra sulphurata.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from sulphuratus to sulphurata.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Yellow Canary Serinus flaviventris

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yellow Canary from Serinus flaviventris to Crithagra flaviventris.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, White-throated Canary Serinus albogularis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of White-throated Canary from Serinus albogularis to Crithagra albogularis.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name crocopygius to crocopygia.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Streaky Seedeater Serinus striolatus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Streaky Seedeater from Serinus striolatus to Crithagra striolata.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from striolatus to striolata.

Revise the range description for nominate striolata from “Eritrea, Ethiopia, s Sudan, e Uganda, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, extreme southeastern South Sudan, eastern Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Yellow-browed Seedeater Serinus whytii

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yellow-browed Seedeater from Serinus whytii to Crithagra whytii.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 635, Thick-billed Seedeater Serinus burtoni

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Thick-billed Seedeater from Serinus burtoni to Crithagra burtoni.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Tanzania Seedeater Serinus melanochrous

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Tanzania Seedeater from Serinus melanochrous to Crithagra melanochroa.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and

Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Principe Seedeater Serinus rufobrunneus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Principe Seedeater from Serinus rufobrunneus to Crithagra rufobrunnea.

Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from rufobrunneus to rufobrunnea.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 628, Sao Tome Grosbeak Neospiza concolor

Sao Tome Grosbeak is embedded in the genus Crithagra (Melo et al. 2017). Change the scientific name from Neospiza concolor to Crithagra concolor. Revise the range description from “São Tomé (rediscovered in 1996 after 101-year absence)” to “São Tomé (Gulf of Guinea)”.

Reference:

Melo, M., M. Stervander, B. Hansson, and P.J. Jones. 2017. The endangered São Tomé Grosbeak Neospiza concolor is the world’s largest canary. Ibis 159: 673-679.

 

page 636, Black-eared Seedeater Serinus mennelli

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Black-eared Seedeater from Serinus mennelli to Crithagra mennelli.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Streaky-headed Seedeater Serinus gularis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Streaky-headed Seedeater from Serinus gularis to Crithagra gularis.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Streaky-headed Seedeater (West African) from Serinus gularis [canicapilla Group] to Crithagra gularis [canicapilla Group].

Revise the range description of subspecies elgonensis from “S Sudan to w Kenya” to “northwestern Central African Republic and adjacent southern Chad, South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and extreme western Kenya”.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Streaky-headed Seedeater (Streaky-headed) from Serinus gularis [gularis Group] to Crithagra gularis [gularis Group].

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Reichard’s Seedeater Serinus reichardi

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Reichard’s Seedeater from Serinus reichardi to Crithagra reichardi.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Reichard’s Seedeater (Stripe-breasted) Crithagra reichardi striatipectus from “Mts. of s Sudan to s Ethiopia and central highlands of Kenya” to “eastern and southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, and western and central Kenya”.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Brown-rumped Seedeater Serinus tristriatus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Brown-rumped Seedeater from Serinus tristriatus to Crithagra tristriata.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Yemen Serin Serinus menachensis

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yemen Serin from Serinus menachensis to Crithagra menachensis.

References:

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 633, Ankober Serin Carduelis ankoberensis

Ankober Serin was classified by Fry and Keith (2004) in Carduelis, but it was described as a species of Serinus (Ash 1979), and is considered by most authorities to be closely related to Yemen Serin Crithagra menachensis. The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and many species of Serinus are transferred to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Ankober Serin from Carduelis ankoberensis to Crithagra ankoberensis.

References:

Ash, J.S. 1979. A new species of serin from Ethiopia. Ibis 121: 1-7.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 636, Cape Siskin Pseudochloroptila totta

The genus Pseudochloroptila is embedded in the group of species transferred from Serinus to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004). Change the scientific name of Cape Siskin from Pseudochloroptila totta to Crithagra totta.

Reference:

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

 

page 636, Drakensberg Siskin Pseudochloroptila symonsi

The genus Pseudochloroptila is embedded in the group of species transferred from Serinus to the genus Crithagra (Ryan et al. 2004). Change the scientific name of Drakensberg Siskin from Pseudochloroptila symonsi to Crithagra symonsi.

Reference:

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

 

page 633, Twite Carduelis flavirostris

The genus Carduelis is not monophyletic, and so Twite and the linnets are transferred to the genus Linaria (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Twite from Carduelis flavirostris to Linaria flavirostris.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 633, Eurasian Linnet Carduelis cannabina

The genus Carduelis is not monophyletic, and so Twite and the linnets are transferred to the genus i (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Eurasian Linnet from Carduelis cannabina to Linaria cannabina.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 633, Yemen Linnet Carduelis yemenensis

The genus Carduelis is not monophyletic, and so Twite and the linnets are transferred to the genus Linaria (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Yemen Linnet from Carduelis yemenensis to Linaria yemenensis.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 633, Warsangli Linnet Carduelis johannis

The genus Carduelis is not monophyletic, and so Twite and the linnets are transferred to the genus Linaria (Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Warsangli Linnet from Carduelis johannis to Linaria johannis.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Mountain Serin Serinus estherae

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and as a result Mountain Serin is transferred to the genus Chrysocorythus (Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Mountain Serin from Serinus estherae to Chrysocorythus estherae.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Citril Finch Carduelis citrinella

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and as a result the citril finches are transferred to the genus Carduelis (Arnaiz-Villena 2007, 2008, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Citril Finch from Serinus citrinella to Carduelis citrinella.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J.I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Corsican Finch Serinus corsicanus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and as a result the citril finches are transferred to the genus Carduelis (Arnaiz-Villena 2007, 2008, Nguembock et al. 2009, Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Corsican Finch from Serinus corsicanus to Carduelis corsicana.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J.I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Nguembock B., J. Fjeldså, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of Carduelinae (Aves, Passeriformes, Fringillidae) proves polyphyletic origin of the genera Serinus and Carduelis and suggests redefined generic limits. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 51: 169-181.

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 634, Abyssinian Siskin Serinus nigriceps

In accord with prevailing usage (e.g. Fry and Keith 2004, Sinclair and Ryan 2010), change the English name of Serinus nigriceps from Abyssinian Siskin to Ethiopian Siskin.

References:

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

Sinclair, I., and P. Ryan. 2010. Birds of Africa south of the Sahara. Second edition. Struik Nature, Cape Town.

 

page 636, Black-headed Canary Alario alario

The genus Alario is embedded in Serinus (Ryan et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, 2008). Change the scientific name of Black-headed Canary from Alario alario to Serinus alario.

References:

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J.I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

 

page 636, Damara Canary Alario leucolaemus

The genus Alario is embedded in Serinus (Ryan et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2007, 2008). Change the scientific name of Damara Canary from Alario leucolaemus to Serinus leucolaemus.

References:

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, M. Wink, and J. I. Serrano-Vela. 2007. Bayesian phylogeny of Fringillinae birds: status of the singular African oriole finch Linurgus olivaceus and evolution and heterogeneity of the genus Carpodacus. Acta Zoologia Sinica 53: 826-834.

Arnaiz-Villena, A., J. Moscoso, V. Ruiz-del-Valle, J. Gonzalez, R. Reguera, A. Ferri, M. Wink, and J.I. Serrano-Vela. 2008. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic definition of a group of ‘arid-zone’ Carduelini finches. The Open Ornithology Journal 1: 1-7.

Ryan, P.G., D. Wright, G. Oatley, J. Wakeling, C. Cohen, T.L. Newell, R.C.K. Bowie, V. Ward, and T.M. Crowe. 2004. Systematics of Serinus canaries and the status of Cape and Yellow-crowned Canaries inferred from mtDNA and morphology. Ostrich 75: 288-294.

 

page 634, Tibetan Serin Serinus thibetanus

The genus Serinus is not monophyletic, and as a result Tibetan Serin is transferred to the genus Spinus (Zuccon et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Tibetan Serin from Serinus thibetanus to Spinus thibetanus.

Reference:

Zuccon, D., R. Prŷs-Jones, P.C. Rasmussen, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62: 581-596.

 

page 632, Lesser Goldfinch Spinus psaltria

Correct the subspecies name columbianus to the correct original spelling colombianus.

 

page 603, Shelley’s Rufous Sparrow Passer shelleyi

Revise the range description from “SE Sudan to ne Uganda, e Ethiopia and nw Somalia” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern and eastern Ethiopia, northwestern Somalia, northern Uganda, and extreme western Kenya”.

 

page 603, Northern Gray-headed Sparrow Passer griseus

Revise the range description of nominate griseus from “Senegal to s Chad, n Cameroon, n Gabon and s Sudan” to “southern Mauritania and Senegal to Cameroon, western Central African Republic, southern Chad, south to northern Gabon”.

Revise the range description of subspecies ugandae from “Angola to s Sudan, n Ethiopia, Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “eastern Sudan, Eritrea, and northwestern Ethiopia south to southern Gabon, Angola, northern Namibia, northern Zimbabwe, Malawi, and central Tanzania”.

 

page 603, Parrot-billed Sparrow Passer gongonensis

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to s Ethiopia, s Somalia, Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, eastern Uganda, Kenya, southern Somalia, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 603, Arabian Golden Sparrow Passer euchlorus

Revise the range description from “SW Saudi Arabia to South Yemen, adj. Ethiopia and n Somalia” to “southwestern Arabian Peninsula (southwestern Saudi Arabia and western Yemen; Djibouti and northwestern Somalia”.

 

page 603, Chestnut Sparrow Passer eminibey

Revise the range description from “S Sudan and sw Ethiopia to Uganda, Somalia and n Tanzania” to “central Chad, southwestern Sudan, South Sudan, and southwestern Ethiopia to northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and central and eastern Tanzania”.

 

page 603, Yellow-spotted Petronia Petronia pyrgita

Revise the range description of nominate pyrgita from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, Somalia, ne Uganda and ne Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 604, Bush Petronia Petronia dentata

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Ethiopia and s Arabian Peninsula” to “southern Mauritania to Guinea, east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and western Ethiopia; western Yemen”.

 

page 604, White-billed Buffalo-Weaver Bubalornis albirostris

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Ethiopia, n Uganda and nw Kenya” to “southern Mauritania to Guinea, east to southern Sudan, western Ethiopia, and northern Eritrea, south to southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, and northwestern Kenya”.

 

page 605, Speckle-fronted Weaver Sporopipes frontalis

Revise the range description of subspecies emini from “S Sudan to ne Uganda, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, northern Uganda, western Kenya, and northern and central Tanzania”.

 

page 605, Gray-headed Social-Weaver Pseudonigrita arnaudi

Revise the range description of nominate arnaudi from “SW Sudan to s Ethiopia, Kenya, southern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and extreme northern Tanzania”.

 

page 606, Red-headed Weaver Anaplectes rubriceps

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Red-headed Weaver (Northern) Anaplectes rubriceps leuconotos from “Senegambia to s Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi” to “Senegambia to southern Chad, northern Central African Republci, southwestern and southern Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and northern Somalia, south through Uganda and Kenya to Malawi”.

 

page 606, Baglafecht Weaver Ploceus baglafecht

Revise the range description of subspecies eremobius from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo and sw Sudan” to “northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and southwestern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Baglafecht Weaver (Emin’s) Ploceus baglafecht emini from “SE Sudan and n Uganda” to “southeastern South Sudan, central and eastern Ethiopia, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 606, Little Weaver Ploceus luteolus

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southern Mauritania and Senegambia east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, western Kenya, and northern Tanzania”.

 

page 606, Black-necked Weaver Ploceus nigricollis

Revise the range description of nominate nigricollis from “E Cameroon to n Angola, s Sudan, s Democratic Republic of the Congo, w Kenya, nw Tanzania” to “eastern Cameroon south to northern Angola and southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, east to extreme southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 606, Spectacled Weaver Ploceus ocularis

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Spectacled Weaver (Yellow-throated) Ploceus ocularis crocatus from “Cameroon to s Sudan, s Ethiopia, Angola and Zambia” to “Cameroon to extreme southern South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia, south to Angola and through East Africa (west of the Rift Valley) to northeastern Namibia, northern Botswana, Zambia (west of the Muchinga Mountains), and northwestern Zimbabwe”.

 

page 606, Black-billed Weaver Ploceus melanogaster

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Black-billed Weaver (Eastern) Ploceus melanogaster stephanophorus from “S Sudan to Uganda, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, w Kenya and w Tanzania” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, western and eastern Uganda, western Kenya, Rwanda, and extreme northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 607, Northern Masked-Weaver Ploceus taeniopterus

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, n Uganda and s Ethiopia” to “Sudan, western and southwestern Ethiopia, South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and western Kenya”.

 

page 607, Lesser Masked-Weaver Ploceus intermedius

Revise the range description of nominate intermedius from “SE Sudan to s Ethiopia, Somalia, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya and Tanzania” to “Ethiopia, northwestern and southern Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, and Tanzania”.

 

page 607, Katanga Masked-Weaver Ploceus katangae

We add a previously overlooked subspecies, upembae Verheyen 1953, with range “southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (headwaters of the Lualaba River, Katanga)”.

With the addition of subspecies upembae, revise the range description of nominate katangae from “Spottily distributed e Democratic Republic of the Congo and n Zambia” to “spottily distributed in northern Zambia and immediately adjacent southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”.

 

page 607, Heuglin’s Masked-Weaver Ploceus heuglini

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to sw Sudan, s Uganda and nw Kenya” to “Senegambia to southern Chad and northern Central African Republic; southwestern South Sudan (and southeastern Central African Republic?), northeastern Democratic Republic of the Conto, Uganda and western Kenya”.

 

pages 607-608, Village Weaver Ploceus cucullatus

Revise the range description of subspecies bohndorffi from “N Gabon to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, w Kenya and sw Sudan” to “northern Gabon, Central African Republic, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwestern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

Revise the range description of subspecies abyssinicus from “Ethiopia and se Sudan” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, southeastern Sudan, and eastern South Sudan”.

 

page 608, Black-headed Weaver Ploceus melanocephalus

Revise the range description of subspecies dimidiatus from “E Sudan to nw Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia” to “Eritrea, northwestern Ethiopia, southeastern Sudan, southern South Sudan, easern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, western Kenya, northwestern Tanzania, and northeastern Zambia”.

 

page 608, Golden-backed Weaver Ploceus jacksoni

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to Uganda, Burundi, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, Uganda, Burundi, western Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 608, Chestnut Weaver Ploceus rubiginosus

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Chestnut Weaver (Chestnut) Ploceus rubiginosus rubiginosus from “Extreme se Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, northwestern and southern Somalia, extreme southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 608, Cinnamon Weaver Ploceus badius

Revise the range description from “Sudan (Nile tributaries south to Uganda border)” to “Nile Valley of central and southern Sudan and of South Sudan”.

 

page 608, Yellow-mantled Weaver Ploceus tricolor

Revise the range description of subspecies interscapularis from “N Democratic Republic of the Congo to w Uganda, Kenya and extreme sw Sudan” to “patchily distributed in northern and central Democratic Republic of the Congo, extreme southwestern South Sudan, and Uganda; northwestern Angola”.

 

page 608, Brown-capped Weaver Ploceus insignis

Revise the range description from “SE Nigeria to n Angola, s Sudan, Kenya and w Tanzania; Bioko” to “southeastern Nigeria, southwestern Cameroon, and Bioko; western Angola; extreme southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, western and eastern Uganda, western Kenya, western Rwanda, western Burundi, and western Tanzania”.

 

page 609, Asian Golden Weaver Ploceus hypoxanthus

Change the subspecies name hymenaicus to the older available name chryseus (Pittie and Dickinson 2008).

Reference:

Pittie, A., and E.C. Dickinson. 2008. The oldest name of the mainland form of the Asian Golden Weaver Ploceus hypoxanthus. Indian Birds 4: 22.

 

page 609, Compact Weaver Pachyphantes superciliosus

Revise the range description from “Sierra Leone to Angola, s Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda and w Kenya” to “patchily distributed from southwestern Senegal and Guinea-Bissau east to southeastern Sudan, eastern and southern South Sudan, and western Ethiopia south to northern Angola, southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, southwestern Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 609, Cardinal Quelea Quelea cardinalis

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia, Zimbabwe” to “southern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya south to central and eastern Zambia and central Malawi; rare nonbreeding visitor to Ethiopia”.

 

page 610, Northern Red Bishop Euplectes franciscanus

Revise the range description from “Senegal to Sudan, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, n Uganda and nw Kenya” to “southern Maurtania south to northern Liberia, east to Eritrea, Ethiopia, northwestern and southern Somalia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and Kenya”.

 

page 610, Yellow-crowned Bishop Euplectes afer

Revise the range of nominate afer from “S Mauritania to Chad, CAR, w Sudan, n Democratic Republic of the Congo and nw Angola” to “southern Mauritania south patchily to Sierra Leona, east to western Sudan, and south to Congo, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and western Angola”.

Revise the range description of subspecies taha from “S Sudan, s Ethiopia and Somalia to South Africa” to “southern Angola east to South Sudan and southwestern Ethiopia, south to South Africa”.

 

page 610, White-winged Widowbird Euplectes albonotatus

Revise the range of subspecies eques from “CAR to Sudan, Ethiopia and s Tanzania” to “Central African Republic, southwestern Sudan, southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 610, Yellow-mantled Widowbird Euplectes macroura

Revise the range description of nominate macroura from “Senegal to s Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, Zambia and Malawi” to “southern Senegal to Liberia, east to southern Sudan and South Sudan, south to central Angola, Zambia, eastern Zimbabwe, western Mozambique, and Malawi”.

 

page 610, Red-collared Widowbird Euplectes ardens

Revise the range description of subspecies laticauda from “Highlands of se Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia” to “highlands of eastern South Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Red-collared Widowbird (Red-collared) Euplectes ardens ardens from “Sierra Leone to Uganda, sw Sudan and Tanzania to South Africa” to “Senegal and Sierra Leone east to southern South Sudan and western Uganda, south to central Angola, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Mozambique, and eastern South Africa”.

 

page 610, Fan-tailed Widowbird Euplectes axillaris

Revise the range description of subspecies phoeniceus from “S Sudan to s Ethiopia, Uganda, w Kenya, w Tanzania and Zambia” to “southeastern Sudan, South Sudan, and western Ethiopia south through eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya to eastern Zambia and northern Malawi”.

 

page 611, Grosbeak Weaver Amblyospiza albifrons

Revise the range description of subspecies melanota from “Ethiopia, s Sudan, Uganda, w Kenya, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, nw Tanzania” to “South Sudan, western and central Ethiopia, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

page 611, Gray-headed Nigrita Nigrita canicapillus

Revise the range description of subspecies schistaceus from “S Sudan to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, sw Uganda, w Kenya and n Tanzania” to “extreme southern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, western Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania”.

 

age 612, Gray-headed Oliveback Nesocharis capistrata

Revise the range description from “Guinea to s Mali, Cameroon, n Democratic Republic of the Congo, sw Sudan and w Uganda” to “Guinea-Bissau and Guinea east to Central African Republic, southwestern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and western Uganda”.

 

page 612, Yellow-bellied Waxbill Coccopygia quartinia

Revise the range description of subspecies kilimensis from “SE Sudan, e Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya to central Tanzania” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and northern and central Tanzania”.

 

page 612, Shelley’s Crimson-wing Cryptospiza shelleyi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Fry and Keith 2004), change the English name of Cryptospiza shelleyi from Shelley’s Crimson-wing to Shelley’s Crimsonwing.

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

 

page 612, Dusky Crimson-wing Cryptospiza jacksoni

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Fry and Keith 2004), change the English name of Cryptospiza jacksoni from Dusky Crimson-wing to Dusky Crimsonwing.

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

 

page 612, Abyssinian Crimson-wing Cryptospiza salvadorii

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Fry and Keith 2004), change the English name of Cryptospiza salvadorii from Abyssinian Crimson-wing to Abyssinian Crimsonwing.

Revise the range description of subspecies kilimensis from “S Sudan to e Uganda, se Kenya and n Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, eastern Uganda, Kenya (except the north), and northern Tanzania”.

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

 

page 612, Red-faced Crimson-wing Cryptospiza reichenovii

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Fry and Keith 2004), change the English name of Cryptospiza reichenovii from Red-faced Crimson-wing to Red-faced Crimsonwing.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Cryptospiza reichenovii reichenovii from Red-faced Crimson-wing (Western) to Red-faced Crimsonwing (Western).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Cryptospiza reichenovii australis/ocularis from Red-faced Crimson-wing (Eastern) to Red-faced Crimsonwing (Eastern).

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Fry, C.H., and S. Keith (editors). 2004. The birds of Africa. Volume VII. Academic Press, London.

 

page 612, Fawn-breasted Waxbill Estrilda paludicola

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Fawn-breasted Waxbill (Abyssinian) Estrilda paludicola ochrogaster from “Highlands of extreme e Sudan” to “western Ethiopia and eastern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of nominate paludicola from “S Sudan, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and w Kenya” to “Central African Republic, southern Sudan, western South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern and central Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 612, Crimson-rumped Waxbill Estrilda rhodopyga

Revise the range description of subspecies centralis from “S Sudan to n Malawi” to “southern South Sudan, central and southern Ethiopia, and northern and southern Somalia south to northern Malawi”.

 

page 612, Black-rumped Waxbill Estrilda troglodytes

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to s Sudan, nw Ethiopia, sw Eritrea and w Kenya” to “southern Mauritania and Senegambia east to southern Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, Uganda, and western Kenya; also widely introduced, to the Caribbean (Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, Martinique), Hawaiian Islands, Spain, and Japan”.

 

pages 612-613, Common Waxbill Estrilda astrild

Revise the range description of subspecies macmillani from “Central and s Sudan” to “South Sudan”.

 

page 613, Black-cheeked Waxbill Estrilda charmosyna

Revise the range description of nominate charmosyna from “Extreme s Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, ne Uganda and ne Kenya” to “southern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, northeastern Uganda, and northern and eastern Kenya”.

 

page 613, Red-headed Bluebill Spermophaga ruficapilla

Revise the range description of nominate ruficapilla from “S Sudan to Uganda, w Kenya, w Tanzania and nw Angola” to “northern Angola to southern South Sudan, Uganda, western Kenya, and western Tanzania”.

 

page 613, Red-cheeked Cordonbleu Uraeginthus bengalus

Revise the range description of nominate bengalus from “Senegal to Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Uganda and w Kenya” to “Senegal south to Guinea, east to Eritrea, Ethiopia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and Kenya (west of the Rift Valley)”.

 

page 614, Blue-capped Cordonbleu Uraeginthus cyanocephalus

Revise the range description of from “Extreme se Sudan to se Ethiopia, s Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania” to “extreme southeastern South Sudan, extreme southeastern Ethiopia, southern Somalia, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 614, Purple Grenadier Granatina ianthinogaster

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to s Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, southern Ethiopia, Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 614, Dybowski’s Twinspot Euschistospiza dybowskii

Revise the range description from “Senegambia and Guinea to n Democratic Republic of the Congo and extreme s Sudan” to “discontinuously distributed from southeastern Senegal to Guinea, east to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and northwestern Uganda”.

 

page 614, Brown Twinspot Clytospiza monteiri

Revise the range description from “SE Nigeria to s Chad, s Sudan, w Uganda, w Kenya and n Angola” to “southeastern Nigeria south to northern Angola, east to southern South Sudan, western Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 614, Red-winged Pytilia Pytilia phoenicoptera

Revise the range description of subspecies emini from “Cameroon to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, n Uganda and extreme s Sudan” to “Cameroon to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

 

page 614, Green-winged Pytilia Pytilia melba

Revise the range description of subspecies citerior from “Senegal to Burkina Faso, s Chad, n Cameroon and w Sudan” to “southern Mauritania south to Guinea-Bissau, east to southern Sudan, western South Sudan, and northwestern Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies soudanensis from “E Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and ne Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda, northern and eastern Kenya, and northeastern Tanzania”.

 

page 614, Red-billed Firefinch Lagonosticta senegala

Revise the range description of subspecies rhodopsis from “E Mali to Sudan and lowlands of w Eritrea and Ethiopia” to “eastern Mali to western Sudan, northern and western South Sudan, Eritrea, and western Ethiopia”.

Revise the range description of subspecies brunneiceps from “Highlands of Ethiopia, Eritrea and se Sudan” to “southeastern South Sudan, and central Ethiopia”.

 

page 614, Bar-breasted Firefinch Lagonosticta rufopicta

Revise the range description of subspecies lateritia from “NE Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, w Ethiopia, Uganda and Kenya” to “South Sudan, western Ethiopia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 615, Black-faced Firefinch Lagonosticta larvata

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Black-faced Firefinch (Gray) from “Central and s Mali to Sudan and Uganda” to “central and southern Mali east to southwestern Lagonosticta larvata nigricollis Sudan, western and southern South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and northern Uganda”.

Revise the range description of the monotypic group Black-faced Firefinch (Reddish) Lagonosticta larvata larvata from “W Ethiopia and e Sudan” to “southeastern Sudan, eastern South Sudan and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 615, Black-bellied Firefinch Lagonosticta rara

Revise the range description of nominate rara from “N Cameroon to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan, n Uganda and w Kenya” to “Cameroon to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 615, African Firefinch Lagonosticta rubricata

Revise the range description of subspecies congica from “Cameroon to s Sudan, Angola, w Uganda and Democratic Republic of the Congo” to “Cameroon south to northern Angola, east to South Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and western Uganda”.

Revise the range description of subspecies haematocephala from “Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania to Mozambique” to “eastern South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia south through Uganda and Kenya to Zambia, eastern Zimbabwe, Malawi, and central Mozambique”.

 

page 615, Jameson’s Firefinch Lagonosticta rhodopareia

Revise the range description of nominate rhodopareia from “Ethiopia, Sudan and w Uganda to n Kenya” to “eastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, northeastern Uganda, and northern Kenya”.

 

page 615, Cut-throat Amadina fasciata

Revise the range description of nominate fasciata from “Senegal to Sudan” to “southern Mauritania to southern Senegal, east to Sudan and South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies alexanderi from “Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia to se Sudan, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania” to “Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 615, Zebra Waxbill Sporaeginthus subflavus

Revise the range description of nominate subflavus from “Senegal to s Sudan, Ethiopia and w Kenya; South Yemen” to “extreme southwestern Mauritania and Senegal south to Liberia, east to western Sudan, South Sudan, Ethiopia, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and northwestern Tanzania; western Yemen”.

 

page 615, Black-faced Quailfinch Ortygospiza atricollis

Revise the range description of subspecies ugandae from “S Sudan, nw Uganda, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and w Kenya” to “southern Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, and western Kenya”.

 

page 617, Bronze Mannikin Spermestes cucullata

Revise the range description of nominate cucullata from “Senegal to w Kenya and nw Angola; São Tomé and Príncipe” to “Senegal south to Liberia, east to southwestern South Sudan and western Kenya, south to Gabon and Congo; Bioko, Príncipe, São Tomé and Annobón”.

Revise the range description of subspecies scutata from “Ethiopia and Sudan to Natal and e Cape Province; Comoro Is.” to “Ethiopia and adjacent southeastern Sudan and eastern South Sudan to Angola, northern and eastern Botswana, and eastern South Africa; Comoro Islands”.

 

page 618, African Silverbill Euodice cantans

Revise the range description of nominate cantans from “Senegal to central Sudan” to “Mauritania and Senegal east to central Sudan and northwestern South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies orientalis from “Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and n Tanzania; se Arabia” to “extreme southeastern Egypt, eastern Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia, southeastern South Sudan, Kenya and northern Tanzania; southern Arabian Peninsula (southwestern Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and western Oman)”.

 

page 620, Pin-tailed Whydah Vidua macroura

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to s Chad, s Sudan, s Somalia and South Africa” to “very widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa, from southern Mauritania east to Eritrea, south to South Africa; introduced in the southern United States (California, Florida) and the Caribbean (Puerto Rico)”.

 

page 620, Sahel Paradise-Whydah Vidua orientalis

Revise the range description of nominate orientalis from “Chad to Sudan and Eritrea” to “northern Cameroon and southern Chad east to southern Sudan, northern South Sudan, Eritrea, and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 620, Eastern Paradise-Whydah Vidua paradisaea

Revise the range description from “Angola to se Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya south to ne S Africa” to “southeastern Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia south to northeastern South Africa, also west across southern Africa to Angola and northern Namibia”.

 

page 620, Steel-blue Whydah Vidua hypocherina

Revise the range description from “S Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania” to “southern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, northern Uganda, Kenya, and northern and central Tanzania”.

 

page 620, Straw-tailed Whydah Vidua fischeri

Revise the range description from “Extreme se Sudan to Ethiopia, Somalia, Uganda and Tanzania” to “southeastern South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, northeastern Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania”.

 

page 620, Village Indigobird Vidua chalybeata

Revise the range description of subspecies neumanni from “E Mali and Burkina Faso to s Sudan and Eritrea” to “eastern Mali, northern Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso east to Sudan and South Sudan”.

Revise the range description of subspecies ultramarina from “Ethiopia” to “Eritrea and Ethiopia”.

 

page 621, Wilson’s Indigobird Vidua wilsoni

Revise the range description from “Senegambia to n Democratic Republic of the Congo, s Sudan and nw Ethiopia” to “Senegambia to Guinea, east to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 621, Quailfinch Indigobird Vidua nigeriae

Revise the range description from “Discontinuous in Gambia, Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon and Sudan” to “patchily distributed in Gambia, Mali, Nigeria, northern Cameroon, and southeastern South Sudan”.

 

page 621, Jambandu Indigobird Vidua raricola

Revise the range description from “Sierra Leone to n Nigeria, n Cameroon, n Democratic Republic of the Congo and s Sudan” to “discontinuously distributed from Sierra Leone east to southwestern Sudan, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 621, Baka Indigobird Vidua larvaticola

Revise the range description from “SE Senegal to Cameroon, n Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan and w Ethiopia” to “patchily distributed from Guinea-Bissau and northeastern Ivory Coast east to southwestern and eastern Sudan, northeastern South Sudan, and western Ethiopia”.

 

page 621, Cameroon Indigobird Vidua camerunensis

Revise the range description from “Sierra Leone to e Cameroon, ne Democratic Republic of the Congo and s Sudan” to “discontinuously distributed from Sierra Leone east to northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan”.

GROUPS

GROUPS – newly created groups

 

Yellow-legged Tinamou (zabele) Crypturellus noctivagus zabele

 

Yellow-legged Tinamou (noctivagus) Crypturellus noctivagus noctivagus

 

Bare-faced Curassow (Belem) Crax fasciolata pinima

 

Bare-faced Curassow (Bare-faced) Crax fasciolata fasciolata/grayi

 

Chestnut-necklaced Partridge (Chestnut-necklaced) Arborophila charltonii charltonii/atjenensis

 

Chestnut-necklaced Partridge (Sabah) Arborophila charltonii graydoni

 

Moorland Francolin (Moorland) Scleroptila psilolaema psilolaema

 

Moorland Francolin (Elgon) Scleroptila psilolaema elgonensis

 

Shelley’s Francolin (Shelley’s) Scleroptila shelleyi shelleyi

 

Shelley’s Francolin (Whyte’s) Scleroptila shelleyi whytei

 

Crestless Fireback (Malay) Lophura erythrophthalma erythrophthalma

 

Crestless Fireback (Bornean) Lophura erythrophthalma pyronota

 

Black-shouldered Kite (African) Elanus caeruleus caeruleus

 

Black-shouldered Kite (Asian) Elanus caeruleus [vociferus Group]

 

Variable Goshawk (Lesser Sundas) Accipiter hiogaster sylvestris

 

Variable Goshawk (Variable) Accipiter hiogaster [hiogaster Group]

 

Sharp-shinned Hawk (Madrean) Accipiter striatus madrensis

 

Woodford’s Rail (Bougainville) Nesoclopeus woodfordi tertius

 

Woodford’s Rail (Santa Isabel) Nesoclopeus woodfordi immaculatus

 

Woodford’s Rail (Guadalcanal) Nesoclopeus woodfordi woodfordi

 

Mangrove Rail (Fonseca) Rallus longirostris berryorum

 

Red-breasted Dotterel (Northern) Charadrius obscurus aquilonius

 

Red-breasted Dotterel (Southern) Charadrius obscurus obscurus

 

Three-banded Plover (African) Charadrius tricollaris tricollaris

 

Three-banded Plover (Madagascar) Charadrius tricollaris bifrontatus

 

Painted Buttonquail (New Caledonian) Turnix varius novaecaledoniae

 

Painted Buttonquail (Painted) Turnix varius varius/scintillans

 

Metallic Pigeon (Metallic) Columba vitiensis [vitiensis Group]

 

Metallic Pigeon (Samoan) Columba vitiensis castaneiceps

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Eurasian) Streptopelia decaocto decaocto

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Burmese) Streptopelia decaocto xanthocycla

 

Bronze Ground-Dove (Western) Alopecoenas beccarii beccarii

 

Bronze Ground-Dove (Eastern) Alopecoenas beccarii [johannae Group]

 

Spinifex Pigeon (Rufous-bellied) Geophaps plumifera ferruginea

 

Spinifex Pigeon (White-bellied) Geophaps plumifera plumifera/leucogaster

 

Pheasant Pigeon (Green-naped) Otidiphaps nobilis nobilis

 

Pheasant Pigeon (White-naped) Otidiphaps nobilis aruensis

 

Pheasant Pigeon (Gray-naped) Otidiphaps nobilis cervicalis

 

Pheasant Pigeon (Black-naped) Otidiphaps nobilis insularis

 

Southern Crowned-Pigeon (Sclater’s) Goura scheepmakeri sclaterii

 

Southern Crowned-Pigeon (Scheepmaker’s) Goura scheepmakeri scheepmakeri

 

African Green-Pigeon (African) Treron calvus [calvus Group]

 

African Green-Pigeon (Gray-breasted) Treron calvus delalandii/granti

 

Red-eared Fruit-Dove (Red-eared) Ptilinopus fischeri fischeri/centralis

 

Red-eared Fruit-Dove (Lompobattang) Ptilinopus fischeri meridionalis

 

Ornate Fruit-Dove (Western) Ptilinopus ornatus ornatus

 

Ornate Fruit-Dove (Eastern) Ptilinopus ornatus gestroi

 

Crimson-crowned Fruit-Dove (Tongan) Ptilinopus porphyraceus porphyraceus

 

Crimson-crowned Fruit-Dove (Samoan) Ptilinopus porphyraceus fasciatus

 

Yellow-bibbed Fruit-Dove (Geelvink) Ptilinopus solomonensis speciosus

 

Yellow-bibbed Fruit-Dove (Yellow-banded) Ptilinopus solomonensis [solomonensis Group]

 

Bare-faced Go-away-bird (Brown-faced) Corythaixoides personatus personatus

 

Bare-faced Go-away-bird (Black-faced) Corythaixoides personatus leopoldi

 

Crested Coua (Crested) Coua cristata [cristata Group]

 

Crested Coua (Chestnut-vented) Coua cristata pyropyga

 

Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Mentawai) Phaenicophaeus curvirostris oeneicaudus

 

Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Chestnut-breasted) Phaenicophaeus curvirostris [curvirostris

Group]

 

Hantu Boobook (Buru) Ninox squamipila hantu

 

Hantu Boobook (Seram) Ninox squamipila squamipila

 

Solomons Boobook (West Solomons) Ninox jacquinoti [jacquinoti Group]

 

Solomons Boobook (Guadalcanal) Ninox jacquinoti granti

 

Solomons Boobook (Malaita) Ninox jacquinoti malaitae

 

Solomons Boobook (Makira) Ninox jacquinoti roseoaxillaris

 

Straight-billed Hermit (bourcieri) Phaethornis bourcieri bourcieri

 

Straight-billed Hermit (major) Phaethornis bourcieri major

 

Gray-chinned Hermit (Gray-chinned) Phaethornis griseogularis griseogularis/zonura

 

Gray-chinned Hermit (Porculla) Phaethornis griseogularis porcullae

 

Wedge-billed Hummingbird (Eastern) Schistes geoffroyi geoffroyi/chapmani

 

Wedge-billed Hummingbird (Western) Schistes geoffroyi albogularis

 

Antillean Mango (Hispaniolan) Anthracothorax dominicus dominicus

 

Antillean Mango (Puerto Rican) Anthracothorax dominicus aurulentus

 

Festive Coquette (Butterfly) Lophornis chalybeus verreauxii/klagesi

 

Festive Coquette (Festive) Lophornis chalybeus chalybeus

 

Bearded Mountaineer (Western) Oreonympha nobilis albolimbata

 

Bearded Mountaineer (Eastern) Oreonympha nobilis nobilis

 

Violet-throated Starfrontlet (Huanuco) Coeligena violifer dichroura

 

Violet-throated Starfrontlet (Apurimac) Coeligena violifer albicaudata

 

Violet-throated Starfrontlet (Cuzco) Coeligena violifer osculans

 

Violet-throated Starfrontlet (Bolivian) Coeligena violifer violifer

 

Booted Racket-tail (White-booted) Ocreatus underwoodii [underwoodii Group]

 

Booted Racket-tail (Peruvian) Ocreatus underwoodii peruanus

 

Booted Racket-tail (Anna’s) Ocreatus underwoodii annae

 

Booted Racket-tail (Adda’s) Ocreatus underwoodii addae

 

White-tailed Hillstar (Rufous-gaped) Urochroa bougueri bougueri

 

White-tailed Hillstar (White-tailed) Urochroa bougueri leucura

 

Black-throated Brilliant (Black-throated) Heliodoxa schreibersii schreibersii

 

Black-throated Brilliant (Black-breasted) Heliodoxa schreibersii whitelyana

 

Brace’s Emerald (Brace’s) Chlorostilbon bracei bracei

 

Brace’s Emerald (Caribbean) Chlorostilbon bracei elegans

 

Gray-breasted Sabrewing (largipennis) Campylopterus largipennis largipennis

 

Gray-breasted Sabrewing (obscurus) Campylopterus largipennis obscurus

 

Gray-breasted Sabrewing (Dry Forest) Campylopterus largipennis calcirupicola

 

Gray-breasted Sabrewing (diamantinensis) Campylopterus largipennis diamantinensis

 

Sapphire-spangled Emerald (Sapphire-spangled) Amazilia lactea lactea/zimmeri

 

Sapphire-spangled Emerald (Spot-vented) Amazilia lactea bartletti

 

Berylline Hummingbird (Northern) Amazilia beryllina beryllina/viola

 

Berylline Hummingbird (Sumichrast’s) Amazilia beryllina [devillei Group]

 

Black Dwarf Hornbill (Western) Horizocerus hartlaubi hartlaubi

 

Black Dwarf Hornbill (Eastern) Horizocerus hartlaubi granti

 

Blue-banded Kingfisher (Malay) Alcedo euryzona peninsulae

 

Blue-banded Kingfisher (Javan) Alcedo euryzona euryzona

 

Banded Kingfisher (Banded) Lacedo pulchella [pulchella Group]

 

Banded Kingfisher (Black-faced) Lacedo pulchella melanops

 

Lilac-cheeked Kingfisher (Sangihe) Cittura cyanotis sanghirensis

 

Lilac-cheeked Kingfisher (Sulawesi) Cittura cyanotis cyanotis

 

Moustached Kingfisher (Bougainville) Actenoides bougainvillei bougainvillei

 

Moustached Kingfisher (Guadalcanal) Actenoides bougainvillei excelsus

 

Green-backed Kingfisher (Blue-headed) Actenoides monachus monachus

 

Green-backed Kingfisher (Black-headed) Actenoides monachus capucinus

 

Scaly-breasted Kingfisher (Scaly-breasted) Actenoides princeps princeps/erythrorhamphus

 

Scaly-breasted Kingfisher (Plain-backed) Actenoides princeps regalis

 

Lilac-breasted Roller (Blue-breasted) Coracias caudatus lorti

 

Lilac-breasted Roller (Lilac-breasted) Coracias caudatus caudatus

 

Pied Puffbird (Lesser) Notharchus tectus subtectus

 

Pied Puffbird (Greater) Notharchus tectus tectus/picatus

 

Crescent-chested Puffbird (Lesser) Malacoptila striata minor

 

Crescent-chested Puffbird (Greater) Malacoptila striata striata

 

Yellow-billed Jacamar (Yellow-billed) Galbula albirostris albirostris

 

Yellow-billed Jacamar (Cerise-crowned) Galbula albirostris chalcocephala

 

Gray-throated Barbet (Gray-throated) Gymnobucco bonapartei bonapartei

 

Gray-throated Barbet (Gray-headed) Gymnobucco bonapartei cinereiceps

 

Naked-faced Barbet (Naked-faced) Gymnobucco calvus calvus/congicus

 

Naked-faced Barbet (Pale-throated) Gymnobucco calvus vernayi

 

White-eared Barbet (White-lined) Stactolaema leucotis leucogrammica

 

White-eared Barbet (White-eared) Stactolaema leucotis leucotis/kilimensis

 

Blue-eared Barbet (Blue-eared) Psilopogon duvaucelii cyanotis/orientalis

 

Blue-eared Barbet (Black-eared) Psilopogon duvaucelii [duvaucelii Group]

 

Lemon-throated Barbet (Lemon-throated) Eubucco richardsoni richardsoni/nigriceps

 

Lemon-throated Barbet (Flame-throated) Eubucco richardsoni aurantiicollis/purusianus

 

Versicolored Barbet (Blue-cowled) Eubucco versicolor steerii

 

Versicolored Barbet (Blue-chinned) Eubucco versicolor glaucogularis

 

Versicolored Barbet (Blue-moustached) Eubucco versicolor versicolor

 

Lettered Aracari (Humboldt’s) Pteroglossus inscriptus humboldti

 

Lettered Aracari (Lettered) Pteroglossus inscriptus inscriptus

 

Red-necked Aracari (Western) Pteroglossus bitorquatus sturmii

 

Red-necked Aracari (Eastern) Pteroglossus bitorquatus bitorquatus/reichenowi

 

Golden-collared Toucanet (Red-billed) Selenidera reinwardtii reinwardtii

 

Golden-collared Toucanet (Green-billed) Selenidera reinwardtii langsdorffii

 

White-throated Toucan (Red-billed) Ramphastos tucanus tucanus

 

White-throated Toucan (Cuvier’s) Ramphastos tucanus cuvieri/inca

 

White-barred Piculet (Marajo) Picumnus cirratus macconnelli/confusus

 

White-barred Piculet (White-barred) Picumnus cirratus [cirratus Group]

 

Crimson-mantled Woodpecker (Crimson-mantled) Colaptes rivolii [rivolii Group]

 

Crimson-mantled Woodpecker (Black-crowned) Colaptes rivolii atriceps

 

Green-barred Woodpecker (Green-barred) Colaptes melanochloros melanochloros/nattereri

 

Green-barred Woodpecker (Golden-breasted) Colaptes melanochloros [melanolaimus Group]

 

Andean Flicker (Northern) Colaptes rupicola cinereicapillus

 

Andean Flicker (Southern) Colaptes rupicola rupicola/puna

 

Lineated Woodpecker (Lineated) Dryocopus lineatus [lineatus Group]

 

Lineated Woodpecker (Dusky-winged) Dryocopus lineatus fuscipennis

 

Checker-throated Woodpecker (Checker-throated) Picus mentalis humii

 

Checker-throated Woodpecker (Javan) Picus mentalis mentalis

 

Buff-rumped Woodpecker (Buff-rumped) Meiglyptes tristis grammithorax

 

Buff-rumped Woodpecker (White-rumped) Meiglyptes tristis tristis

 

Gray-and-buff Woodpecker (Gray-and-buff) Hemicircus concretus sordidus

 

Gray-and-buff Woodpecker (Red-crested) Hemicircus concretus concretus

 

Blue-rumped Parrot (Blue-rumped) Psittinus cyanurus cyanurus/pontius

 

Blue-rumped Parrot (Simeulue) Psittinus cyanurus abbotti

 

Double-eyed Fig-Parrot (Double-eyed) Cyclopsitta diophthalma [diophthalma Group]

 

Double-eyed Fig-Parrot (Coxen’s) Cyclopsitta diophthalma coxeni

 

Large Fig-Parrot (Large) Psittaculirostris desmarestii [desmarestii Group]

 

Large Fig-Parrot (Yellow-naped) Psittaculirostris desmarestii godmani

 

Large Fig-Parrot (Red-faced) Psittaculirostris desmarestii cervicalis

 

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet (Mustard-capped) Trichoglossus flavoviridis meyeri

 

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet (Yellow-and-green) Trichoglossus flavoviridis flavoviridis

 

Festive Parrot (Northern) Amazona festiva bodini

 

Festive Parrot (Southern) Amazona festiva festiva

 

Mealy Parrot (Northern) Amazona farinosa guatemalae/virenticeps

 

Mealy Parrot (Southern) Amazona farinosa farinosa

 

White-bellied Parrot (Black-legged) Pionites leucogaster xanthomerius

 

White-bellied Parrot (Yellow-tailed) Pionites leucogaster xanthurus

 

White-bellied Parrot (Green-thighed) Pionites leucogaster leucogaster

 

Red-shouldered Macaw (Northern) Diopsittaca nobilis nobilis

 

Red-shouldered Macaw (Southern) Diopsittaca nobilis cumanensis/longipennis

 

Black-and-red Broadbill (Irrawaddy) Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos affinis

 

Black-and-red Broadbill (Black-and-red) Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos [macrorhynchos

Group]

 

Silver-breasted Broadbill (Gray-browed) Serilophus lunatus rubropygius

 

Silver-breasted Broadbill (Silver-breasted) Serilophus lunatus [lunatus Group]

 

Banded Broadbill (Banded) Eurylaimus javanicus [harterti Group]

 

Banded Broadbill (Javan) Eurylaimus javanicus javanicus

 

Ivory-breasted Pitta (Ivory-breasted) Pitta maxima maxima

 

Ivory-breasted Pitta (Morotai) Pitta maxima morotaiensis

 

Black-crested Antshrike (Streak-fronted) Sakesphorus canadensis pulchellus

 

Black-crested Antshrike (Black-crested) Sakesphorus canadensis [canadensis Group]

 

Rufous-capped Antshrike (Northern) Thamnophilus ruficapillus [subfasciatus Group]

 

Rufous-capped Antshrike (Southern) Thamnophilus ruficapillus ruficapillus/cochabambae

 

Ornate Antwren (Western) Epinecrophylla ornata [ornata Group]

 

Ornate Antwren (Eastern) Epinecrophylla ornata hoffmannsi

 

Rufous-winged Antwren (Northern) Herpsilochmus rufimarginatus [scapularis Group]

 

Rufous-winged Antwren (Southern) Herpsilochmus rufimarginatus rufimarginatus

 

Dusky Antbird (tyrannina/crepera) Cercomacroides tyrannina tyrannina/crepera

 

Dusky Antbird (saturatior/vicina) Cercomacroides tyrannina saturatior/vicina

 

Chestnut-backed Antbird (Chestnut-backed) Poliocrania exsul [exsul Group]

 

Chestnut-backed Antbird (Short-tailed) Poliocrania exsul maculifer/cassini

 

Collared Crescentchest (Double-collared) Melanopareia torquata bitorquata

 

Collared Crescentchest (Collared) Melanopareia torquata torquata/rufescens

 

Tawny Antpitta (Northern) Grallaria quitensis alticola

 

Tawny Antpitta (Western) Grallaria quitensis quitensis

 

Tawny Antpitta (Southern) Grallaria quitensis atuensis

 

Long-tailed Woodcreeper (Little) Deconychura longicauda [typica Group]

 

Long-tailed Woodcreeper (Northern) Deconychura longicauda longicauda

 

Long-tailed Woodcreeper (Southern) Deconychura longicauda [pallida Group]

 

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (pectoralis Group) Glyphorynchus spirurus [pectoralis Group]

 

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (spirurus Group) Glyphorynchus spirurus [spirurus Group]

 

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (albigularis) Glyphorynchus spirurus albigularis

 

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (cuneatus Group) Glyphorynchus spirurus [cuneatus Group]

 

Cinnamon-throated Woodcreeper (devillei) Dendrexetastes rufigula devillei

 

Cinnamon-throated Woodcreeper (rufigula) Dendrexetastes rufigula rufigula

 

Cinnamon-throated Woodcreeper (paraensis/moniliger) Dendrexetastes rufigula paraensis/moniliger

 

Spot-crowned Woodcreeper (Northern) Lepidocolaptes affinis affinis/lignicida

 

Spot-crowned Woodcreeper (Southern) Lepidocolaptes affinis neglectus

 

Plain Xenops (mexicanus Group) Xenops minutus [mexicanus Group]

 

Plain Xenops (genibarbis Group) Xenops minutus [genibarbis Group]

 

Plain Xenops (White-throated) Xenops minutus minutus

 

Blackish Cinclodes (Black) Cinclodes antarcticus maculirostris

 

Blackish Cinclodes (Blackish) Cinclodes antarcticus antarcticus

 

Pale-browed Treehunter (Pale-tailed) Cichlocolaptes leucophrus leucophrus

 

Pale-browed Treehunter (Rufous-tailed) Cichlocolaptes leucophrus holti

 

Buff-throated Foliage-gleaner (turdinus) Automolus ochrolaemus turdinus

 

Buff-throated Foliage-gleaner (ochrolaemus) Automolus ochrolaemus ochrolaemus

 

Buff-throated Foliage-gleaner (auricularis) Automolus ochrolaemus auricularis

 

White-throated Barbtail (White-throated) Premnoplex tatei tatei

 

White-throated Barbtail (Paria) Premnoplex tatei pariae

 

Marcapata Spinetail (Pale-crowned) Cranioleuca marcapatae weskei

 

Marcapata Spinetail (Rufous-crowned) Cranioleuca marcapatae marcapatae

 

Light-crowned Spinetail (White-crowned) Cranioleuca albiceps albiceps

 

Light-crowned Spinetail (Buffy-crowned) Cranioleuca albiceps discolor

 

Greater Antillean Elaenia (Jamaican) Elaenia fallax fallax

 

Greater Antillean Elaenia (Hispaniolan) Elaenia fallax cherriei

 

Highland Elaenia (Highland) Elaenia obscura obscura

 

Highland Elaenia (Brazilian) Elaenia obscura sordida

 

Olive-striped Flycatcher (Olive-streaked) Mionectes olivaceus olivaceus

 

Olive-striped Flycatcher (Olive-striped) Mionectes olivaceus [galbinus Group]

 

Slaty-capped Flycatcher (transandinus) Leptopogon superciliaris transandinus

 

Ornate Flycatcher (Western) Myiotriccus ornatus ornatus/stellatus

 

Ornate Flycatcher (Eastern) Myiotriccus ornatus phoenicurus/aureiventris

 

Bronze-olive Pygmy-Tyrant (annectens/berlepschi) Pseudotriccus pelzelni annectens/berlepschi

 

Bronze-olive Pygmy-Tyrant (pelzelni/peruvianus) Pseudotriccus pelzelni pelzelni/peruvianus

 

Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant (Tawny-crowned) Euscarthmus meloryphus meloryphus/paulus

 

Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant (Tawny-fronted) Euscarthmus meloryphus fulviceps

 

Olivaceous Flatbill (Western) Rhynchocyclus olivaceus [aequinoctialis Group]

 

Olivaceous Flatbill (Eastern) Rhynchocyclus olivaceus [olivaceus Group]

 

White-throated Spadebill (Western) Platyrinchus mystaceus [albogularis Group]

 

White-throated Spadebill (Eastern) Platyrinchus mystaceus [mystaceus Group]

 

Cliff Flycatcher (Cliff) Hirundinea ferruginea ferruginea/sclateri

 

Cliff Flycatcher (Swallow) Hirundinea ferruginea bellicosa/pallidior

 

Greater Pewee (Mexican) Contopus pertinax pertinax

 

Greater Pewee (Central American) Contopus pertinax minor

 

Riverside Tyrant (Riverside) Knipolegus orenocensis orenocensis/xinguensis

 

Riverside Tyrant (Sclater’s) Knipolegus orenocensis sclateri

 

White-winged Black-Tyrant (White-rumped) Knipolegus aterrimus heterogyna

 

White-winged Black-Tyrant (White-winged) Knipolegus aterrimus aterrimus/anthracinus

 

Brown-backed Chat-Tyrant (Brown-backed) Ochthoeca fumicolor [fumicolor Group]

 

Brown-backed Chat-Tyrant (Rufous-browed) Ochthoeca fumicolor superciliosa

 

Green Manakin (Choco) Cryptopipo holochlora litae/suffusa

 

Green Manakin (Green) Cryptopipo holochlora holochlora/viridior

 

Black-tailed Tityra (Eastern) Tityra cayana braziliensis

 

Black-tailed Tityra (Western) Tityra cayana cayana

 

Gray-collared Becard (Eastern) Pachyramphus major [major Group]

 

Gray-collared Becard (Western) Pachyramphus major uropygialis

 

Dusky Myzomela (Red-brown) Myzomela obscura rubrobrunnea

 

Dusky Myzomela (Obi) Myzomela obscura rubrotincta

 

Dusky Myzomela (Moluccan) Myzomela obscura simplex/mortyana

 

Dusky Myzomela (Dusky) Myzomela obscura [obscura Group]

 

Red Myzomela (Red) Myzomela cruentata cruentata/coccinea

 

Red Myzomela (Reddish) Myzomela cruentata [erythrina Group]

 

Sulawesi Myzomela (Sulawesi) Myzomela chloroptera [chloroptera Group]

 

Sulawesi Myzomela (Bacan) Myzomela chloroptera batjanensis

 

Wakolo Myzomela (Seram) Myzomela wakoloensis elisabethae

 

Wakolo Myzomela (Buru) Myzomela wakoloensis wakoloensis

 

Red-collared Myzomela (Red-collared) Myzomela rosenbergii rosenbergii/wahgiensis

 

Red-collared Myzomela (Long-billed) Myzomela rosenbergii longirostris

 

Blue-faced Honeyeater (White-quilled) Entomyzon cyanotis albipennis

 

Blue-faced Honeyeater (Blue-faced) Entomyzon cyanotis [cyanotis Group]

 

Fan-tailed Gerygone (Fan-tailed) Gerygone flavolateralis [flavolateralis Group]

 

Fan-tailed Gerygone (Rennell) Gerygone flavolateralis citrina

 

Crested Satinbird (Red) Cnemophilus macgregorii sanguineus

 

Crested Satinbird (Yellow) Cnemophilus macgregorii macgregorii

 

Spotted Berrypecker (Thick-billed) Melanocharis crassirostris crassirostris

 

Spotted Berrypecker (Spotted) Melanocharis crassirostris piperata/viridescens

 

Crested Berrypecker (Eastern) Paramythia montium montium/brevicauda

 

Crested Berrypecker (Western) Paramythia montium olivacea/alpina

 

Western Whipbird (Black-throated) Psophodes nigrogularis nigrogularis/oberon

 

Western Whipbird (White-bellied) Psophodes nigrogularis leucogaster/lashmari

 

Gray-chinned Minivet (Gray-chinned) Pericrocotus solaris [solaris Group]

 

Gray-chinned Minivet (Gray-throated) Pericrocotus solaris montanus/cinereigula

 

Large Cuckooshrike (Indian) Coracina macei macei/layardi

 

Large Cuckooshrike (Large) Coracina macei [nipalensis Group]

 

Large Cuckooshrike (Malay) Coracina macei larutensis

 

Bar-bellied Cuckooshrike (Bar-bellied) Coracina striata [striata Group]

 

Bar-bellied Cuckooshrike (Visayan) Coracina striata panayensis

 

Black-and-white Triller (Northern) Lalage melanoleuca melanoleuca

 

Black-and-white Triller (Southern) Lalage melanoleuca minor

 

Solomons Cuckooshrike (Solomon) Edolisoma holopolium holopolium/tricolor

 

Solomons Cuckooshrike (New Georgia) Edolisoma holopolium pygmaeum

 

Rusty-breasted Whistler (Salayar) Pachycephala fulvotincta teysmanni

 

Rusty-breasted Whistler (Rusty-breasted) Pachycephala fulvotincta [fulvotincta Group]

 

Chinese Gray Shrike (Chinese) Lanius sphenocercus sphenocercus

 

Chinese Gray Shrike (Giant) Lanius sphenocercus giganteus

 

Scrub Greenlet (Yellow-green) Hylophilus flavipes viridiflavus/xuthus

 

Scrub Greenlet (Scrub) Hylophilus flavipes [flavipes Group]

 

Scrub Greenlet (Tobago) Hylophilus flavipes insularis

 

Lemon-chested Greenlet (Lemon-chested) Hylophilus thoracicus griseiventris/aemulus

 

Lemon-chested Greenlet (Rio de Janeiro) Hylophilus thoracicus thoracicus

 

Slaty-capped Shrike-Vireo (Pale-legged) Vireolanius leucotis mikettae

 

Slaty-capped Shrike-Vireo (Slaty-capped) Vireolanius leucotis [leucotis Group]

 

Tawny-crowned Greenlet (Rufous-fronted) Tunchiornis ochraceiceps ferrugineifrons/viridior

 

Tawny-crowned Greenlet (Olive-crowned) Tunchiornis ochraceiceps luteifrons

 

Timor Oriole (Timor) Oriolus melanotis melanotis

 

Timor Oriole (Wetar) Oriolus melanotis finschi

 

Black-and-crimson Oriole (Black-and-crimson) Oriolus cruentus [consanguineus Group]

 

Black-and-crimson Oriole (Javan) Oriolus cruentus cruentus

 

Hair-crested Drongo (Hair-crested) Dicrurus hottentottus [hottentottus Group]

 

Hair-crested Drongo (Short-tailed) Dicrurus hottentottus striatus/samarensis

 

Northern Fantail (Seram) Rhipidura rufiventris cinerea

 

Northern Fantail (Banda Sea) Rhipidura rufiventris hoedti

 

Northern Fantail (Biak) Rhipidura rufiventris kordensis

 

Northern Fantail (Northern) Rhipidura rufiventris isura

 

Rusty-bellied Fantail (Sulawesi) Rhipidura teysmanni teysmanni/toradja

 

Rusty-bellied Fantail (Taliabu) Rhipidura teysmanni sulaensis

 

Arafura Fantail (Supertramp) Rhipidura dryas [semicollaris Group]

 

Arafura Fantail (Arafura) Rhipidura dryas dryas

 

Brown Fantail (Bougainville) Rhipidura drownei drownei

 

Brown Fantail (Guadalcanal) Rhipidura drownei ocularis

 

Streaked Fantail (Vanuatu) Rhipidura verreauxi spilodera

 

Streaked Fantail (Fiji) Rhipidura verreauxi layardi/erythronota

 

Streaked Fantail (Taveuni) Rhipidura verreauxi rufilateralis

 

Streaked Fantail (New Caledonia) Rhipidura verreauxi verreauxi

 

African Crested-Flycatcher (Eastern) Trochocercus cyanomelas [bivittatus Group]

 

African Crested-Flycatcher (Southern) Trochocercus cyanomelas cyanomelas/segregus

 

Rufous Paradise-Flycatcher (Northern) Terpsiphone cinnamomea unirufa

 

Rufous Paradise-Flycatcher (Southern) Terpsiphone cinnamomea cinnamomea/talautensis

 

Black-tailed Monarch (Djaul) Symposiachrus verticalis ateralbus

 

Black-tailed Monarch (Black-tailed) Symposiachrus verticalis verticalis

 

Dull Flycatcher (Mussau) Myiagra hebetior hebetior

 

Dull Flycatcher (Velvet) Myiagra hebetior eichhorni

 

Dull Flycatcher (Djaul) Myiagra hebetior cervinicolor

 

Black Magpie (Malay) Platysmurus leucopterus leucopterus

 

Black Magpie (Bornean) Platysmurus leucopterus aterrimus

 

Black-collared Jay (Black-collared) Cyanolyca armillata armillata/meridana

 

Black-collared Jay (Quindio) Cyanolyca armillata quindiuna

 

Paradise-crow (Halmahera) Lycocorax pyrrhopterus pyrrhopterus/morotensis

 

Paradise-crow (Obi) Lycocorax pyrrhopterus obiensis

 

Torrent Flycatcher (Torrent) Monachella muelleriana muelleriana

 

Torrent Flycatcher (New Britain) Monachella muelleriana coultasi

 

Lemon-bellied Flycatcher (Lemon-bellied) Microeca flavigaster [flavigaster Group]

 

Lemon-bellied Flycatcher (Kimberley) Microeca flavigaster tormenti

 

Pacific Robin (Pacific) Petroica multicolor [pusilla Group]

 

Pacific Robin (Norfolk) Petroica multicolor multicolor

 

Dunn’s Lark (African) Eremalauda dunni dunni

 

Dunn’s Lark (Arabian) Eremalauda dunni eremodites

 

Common House-Martin (Western) Delichon urbicum urbicum/meridionale

 

Common House-Martin (Eastern) Delichon urbicum lagopodum

 

Plain-tailed Wren (Plain-tailed) Pheugopedius euophrys [euophrys Group]

 

Plain-tailed Wren (Gray-browed) Pheugopedius euophrys schulenbergi

 

Chestnut-breasted Wren (Northern) Cyphorhinus thoracicus dichrous

 

Chestnut-breasted Wren (Southern) Cyphorhinus thoracicus thoracicus

 

Musician Wren (Imeri) Cyphorhinus arada transfluvialis

 

Musician Wren (Gray-eared) Cyphorhinus arada salvini

 

Musician Wren (Musician) Cyphorhinus arada arada

 

Musician Wren (Gray-flanked) Cyphorhinus arada griseolateralis

 

Musician Wren (Rondonia) Cyphorhinus arada interpositus

 

Musician Wren (Ferruginous) Cyphorhinus arada modulator

 

Stripe-throated Bulbul (Pale-eyed) Pycnonotus finlaysoni davisoni

 

Stripe-throated Bulbul (Stripe-throated) Pycnonotus finlaysoni finlaysoni/eous

 

Puff-throated Bulbul (Gray-crowned) Alophoixus pallidus griseiceps

 

Puff-throated Bulbul (Puff-throated) Alophoixus pallidus [pallidus Group]

 

Ochraceous Bulbul (Ochraceous) Alophoixus ochraceus [ochraceus Group]

 

Ochraceous Bulbul (Chestnut-vented) Alophoixus ochraceus ruficrissus/fowleri

 

Gray-cheeked Bulbul (Gray-cheeked) Alophoixus bres tephrogenys/gutturalis

 

Gray-cheeked Bulbul (Brown-cheeked) Alophoixus bres bres/balicus

 

Sula Golden-Bulbul (Banggai) Alophoixus longirostris harterti

 

Sula Golden-Bulbul (Sula) Alophoixus longirostris longirostris

 

Gray-eyed Bulbul (Gray-eyed) Iole propinqua [propinqua Group]

 

Gray-eyed Bulbul (innectens) Iole propinqua innectens

 

Olive Bulbul (Olive) Iole viridescens viridescens/lekhakuni

 

Olive Bulbul (Baker’s) Iole viridescens cinnamomeoventris

 

Yellowish Bulbul (Yellowish) Hypsipetes everetti everetti/samarensis

 

Yellowish Bulbul (Sulu) Hypsipetes everetti haynaldi

 

Yellowish Bulbul (Camiguin) Hypsipetes everetti catarmanensis

 

Ashy Bulbul (Cinereous) Hemixos flavala cinereus

 

Ashy Bulbul (Green-winged) Hemixos flavala connectens

 

Sunda Bulbul (Sumatran) Ixos virescens sumatranus

 

Sunda Bulbul (Javan) Ixos virescens virescens

 

Scrub Warbler (Western) Scotocerca inquieta saharae/theresae

 

Scrub Warbler (Eastern) Scotocerca inquieta [inquieta Group]

 

Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Brownish-flanked) Horornis fortipes [fortipes Group]

 

Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Taiwan) Horornis fortipes robustipes

 

Aberrant Bush Warbler (Aberrant) Horornis flavolivaceus [flavolivaceus Group]

 

Aberrant Bush Warbler (Perplexing) Horornis flavolivaceus intricatus/oblitus

 

Sulawesi Leaf Warbler (Sulawesi) Phylloscopus sarasinorum nesophilus

 

Sulawesi Leaf Warbler (Lompobattang) Phylloscopus sarasinorum sarasinorum

 

Timor Leaf Warbler (Flores) Phylloscopus presbytes floris

 

Timor Leaf Warbler (Timor) Phylloscopus presbytes presbytes

 

Sunda Warbler (Sumatran) Seicercus grammiceps sumatrensis

 

Sunda Warbler (Javan) Seicercus grammiceps grammiceps

 

Papyrus Yellow-Warbler (Papyrus) Calamonastides gracilirostris gracilirostris

 

Papyrus Yellow-Warbler (Zambian) Calamonastides gracilirostris bensoni

 

Eurasian Reed Warbler (Siwa) Acrocephalus scirpaceus ammon

 

Fernbird (New Zealand) Megalurus punctatus [punctatus Group]

 

Fernbird (Snares) Megalurus punctatus caudatus

 

Chestnut-backed Bush Warbler (Sulawesi) Locustella castanea castanea

 

Chestnut-backed Bush Warbler (Buru) Locustella castanea disturbans

 

Chestnut-backed Bush Warbler (Seram) Locustella castanea musculus

 

Guadalcanal Thicketbird (Santo) Megalurulus whitneyi whitneyi

 

Guadalcanal Thicketbird (Guadalcanal) Megalurulus whitneyi turipavae

 

Black-throated Prinia (Black-throated) Prinia atrogularis atrogularis

 

Black-throated Prinia (Rufous-crowned) Prinia atrogularis khasiana

 

Yellow-bellied Prinia (Yellow-bellied) Prinia flaviventris [flaviventris Group]

 

Yellow-bellied Prinia (Chinese) Prinia flaviventris sonitans

 

Lesser Whitethroat (curruca/blythi) Sylvia curruca curruca/blythi

 

Lesser Whitethroat (halimodendri) Sylvia curruca halimodendri

 

Brown-winged Parrotbill (Yunnan) Sinosuthora brunnea ricketti

 

Brown-winged Parrotbill (Brown-winged) Sinosuthora brunnea brunnea/styani

 

White-breasted White-eye (Abyssinian) Zosterops abyssinicus [abyssinicus Group]

 

White-breasted White-eye (Kenya) Zosterops abyssinicus flavilateralis/jubaensis

 

Bridled White-eye (Bridled) Zosterops conspicillatus conspicillatus

 

Bridled White-eye (Saipan) Zosterops conspicillatus saypani

 

Cream-throated White-eye (Morotai) Zosterops atriceps dehaani

 

Cream-throated White-eye (Helmahera) Zosterops atriceps fuscifrons

 

Cream-throated White-eye (Bacan) Zosterops atriceps atriceps

 

Black-fronted White-eye (Black-fronted) Zosterops minor [chrysolaemus Group]

 

Black-fronted White-eye (Green-fronted) Zosterops minor minor/rothschildi

 

Gray-throated White-eye (Bougainville) Zosterops ugiensis hamlini

 

Gray-throated White-eye (Gray-throated) Zosterops ugiensis ugiensis/oblitus

 

Gray-cheeked Tit-Babbler (Gray-cheeked) Mixornis flavicollis flavicollis

 

Gray-cheeked Tit-Babbler (Kangean) Mixornis flavicollis prillwitzi

 

Chestnut-winged Babbler (Chestnut-winged) Cyanoderma erythropterum [erythropterum

Group]

 

Chestnut-winged Babbler (Gray-hooded) Cyanoderma erythropterum bicolor/rufum

 

Pale-breasted Illadopsis (Pale-breasted) Illadopsis rufipennis rufipennis/extrema

 

Pale-breasted Illadopsis (Gray-breasted) Illadopsis rufipennis distans/pugensis

 

Black-capped Babbler (Black-capped) Pellorneum capistratum [nigrocapitatum Group]

 

Black-capped Babbler (Rufous-browed) Pellorneum capistratum capistratum

 

Limestone Wren-Babbler (Grayish) Turdinus crispifrons crispifrons/annamensis

 

Limestone Wren-Babbler (Rufous) Turdinus crispifrons calcicola

 

Jungle Babbler (Jungle) Turdoides striata [striata Group]

 

Jungle Babbler (Black-winged) Turdoides striata somervillei

 

Moustached Laughingthrush (Western) Ianthocincla cineracea cineracea/strenua

 

Moustached Laughingthrush (Eastern) Ianthocincla cineracea cinereiceps

 

Black-throated Laughingthrush (Black-throated) Ianthocincla chinensis [chinensis Group]

 

Black-throated Laughingthrush (Hainan) Ianthocincla chinensis monachus

 

Silver-eared Mesia (Silver-eared) Leiothrix argentauris [argentauris Group]

 

Silver-eared Mesia (Sumatran) Leiothrix argentauris laurinae/rookmakeri

 

Spectacled Barwing (Eastern) Actinodura ramsayi radcliffei/yunnanensis

 

Spectacled Barwing (Western) Actinodura ramsayi ramsayi

 

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Asian) Irena puella [puella Group]

 

Asian Fairy-bluebird (Palawan) Irena puella tweeddalii

 

Brown-streaked Flycatcher (Brown-streaked) Muscicapa williamsoni williamsoni

 

Brown-streaked Flycatcher (Umber) Muscicapa williamsoni umbrosa

 

Oriental Magpie-Robin (Oriental) Copsychus saularis [saularis Group]

 

Oriental Magpie-Robin (Black) Copsychus saularis [amoenus Group]

 

White-rumped Shama (Barusan) Copsychus malabaricus [melanurus Group]

 

Blue-breasted Flycatcher (Blue-breasted) Cyornis herioti herioti

 

Blue-breasted Flycatcher (Rufous-breasted) Cyornis herioti camarinensis

 

Pale Blue Flycatcher (Unicolored) Cyornis unicolor unicolor

 

Pale Blue Flycatcher (Diao Luo) Cyornis unicolor diaoluoensis

 

Pale Blue Flycatcher (Hartert’s) Cyornis unicolor harterti

 

Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher (Tickell’s) Cyornis tickelliae tickelliae/jerdoni

 

Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher (Indochinese) Cyornis tickelliae [sumatrensis Group]

 

Flores Jungle-Flycatcher (Russet-backed) Cyornis oscillans oscillans

 

Flores Jungle-Flycatcher (Sumba) Cyornis oscillans stresemanni

 

Chestnut-tailed Jungle-Flycatcher (Philippine) Cyornis ruficauda [ruficauda Group]

 

Chestnut-tailed Jungle-Flycatcher (Sulu) Cyornis ruficauda ocularis

 

Chestnut-tailed Jungle-Flycatcher (Crocker) Cyornis ruficauda ruficrissa/isola

 

Vivid Niltava (Large) Niltava vivida oatesi

 

Vivid Niltava (Small) Niltava vivida vivida

 

Indigo Flycatcher (Rufous-vented) Eumyias indigo ruficrissa/cerviniventris

 

Indigo Flycatcher (Javan) Eumyias indigo indigo

 

Great Shortwing (Minahasa) Heinrichia calligyna simplex

 

Great Shortwing (Great) Heinrichia calligyna calligyna/picta

 

White-browed Shortwing (Himalayan) Brachypteryx montana cruralis

 

White-browed Shortwing (Chinese) Brachypteryx montana sinensis

 

White-browed Shortwing (Taiwan) Brachypteryx montana goodfellowi

 

White-browed Shortwing (Philippine) Brachypteryx montana [poliogyna Group]

 

White-browed Shortwing (Bornean) Brachypteryx montana erythrogyna

 

White-browed Shortwing (Sumatran) Brachypteryx montana saturata

 

White-browed Shortwing (Javan) Brachypteryx montana montana

 

White-browed Shortwing (Flores) Brachypteryx montana floris

 

Japanese Robin (Japanese) Larvivora akahige akahige/rishirensis

 

Japanese Robin (Izu) Larvivora akahige tanensis

 

Ryukyu Robin (Ryukyu) Larvivora komadori komadori/subrufus

 

Ryukyu Robin (Okinawa) Larvivora komadori namiyei

 

White-crowned Forktail (White-crowned) Enicurus leschenaulti [frontalis Group]

 

White-crowned Forktail (Javan) Enicurus leschenaulti leschenaulti

 

White-tailed Robin (White-tailed) Myiomela leucura leucura/montium

 

White-tailed Robin (Cambodian) Myiomela leucura cambodiana

 

Sunda Robin (Sumatran) Myiomela diana sumatrana

 

Sunda Robin (Javan) Myiomela diana diana

 

Red-breasted Wheatear (Buff-breasted) Oenanthe bottae bottae

 

Red-breasted Wheatear (Rusty-breasted) Oenanthe bottae frenata

 

Orange-headed Thrush (Orange-headed) Geokichla citrina [citrina Group]

 

Orange-headed Thrush (White-throated) Geokichla citrina cyanota

 

Orange-headed Thrush (Plain-winged) Geokichla citrina albogularis/andamanensis

 

Orange-headed Thrush (Buff-throated) Geokichla citrina [aurimacula Group]

 

Andean Solitaire (plumbeiceps) Myadestes ralloides plumbeiceps

 

Andean Solitaire (venezuelensis/candelae) Myadestes ralloides venezuelensis/candelae

 

Andean Solitaire (ralloides) Myadestes ralloides ralloides

 

Spotted Nightingale-Thrush (Gould’s) Catharus dryas dryas/ovandensis

 

Spotted Nightingale-Thrush (Sclater’s) Catharus dryas maculatus/blakei

 

Rufous-brown Solitaire (Chestnut-throated) Cichlopsis leucogenys chubbi

 

Rufous-brown Solitaire (Peruvian) Cichlopsis leucogenys peruviana

 

Rufous-brown Solitaire (Guianan) Cichlopsis leucogenys gularis

 

Rufous-brown Solitaire (Rufous-brown) Cichlopsis leucogenys leucogenys

 

Black-billed Thrush (Pantepui) Turdus ignobilis murinus

 

White-necked Myna (Northern) Streptocitta albicollis torquata

 

White-necked Myna (Southern) Streptocitta albicollis albicollis

 

Asian Pied Starling (Asian) Gracupica contra [contra Group]

 

Asian Pied Starling (Javan) Gracupica contra jalla

 

Vinous-breasted Starling (Burmese) Acridotheres burmannicus burmannicus

 

Vinous-breasted Starling (Vinous-breasted) Acridotheres burmannicus leucocephalus

 

Black-winged Starling (Black-winged) Acridotheres melanopterus melanopterus

 

Black-winged Starling (Gray-backed) Acridotheres melanopterus tricolor

 

Black-winged Starling (Gray-rumped) Acridotheres melanopterus tertius

 

Blue-winged Leafbird (Blue-winged) Chloropsis cochinchinensis [moluccensis Group]

 

Blue-winged Leafbird (Javan) Chloropsis cochinchinensis cochinchinensis

 

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Orange-bellied) Chloropsis hardwickii hardwickii/malayana

 

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Grayish-crowned) Chloropsis hardwickii lazulina/melliana

 

Flame-crowned Flowerpecker (Yellow-crowned) Dicaeum anthonyi anthonyi

 

Flame-crowned Flowerpecker (Flame-crowned) Dicaeum anthonyi kampalili/masawan

 

Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (Fire-breasted) Dicaeum ignipectus [ignipectus Group]

 

Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (Cambodian) Dicaeum ignipectus cambodianum

 

Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (Fire-throated) Dicaeum ignipectus [luzoniense Group]

 

Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (Sumatran) Dicaeum ignipectus beccarii

 

Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Blood-breasted) Dicaeum sanguinolentum

sanguinolentum/rhodopygiale

 

Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Sumba) Dicaeum sanguinolentum wilhelminae

 

Blood-breasted Flowerpecker (Timor) Dicaeum sanguinolentum hanieli

 

Mistletoebird (Pink-breasted) Dicaeum hirundinaceum keiense/fulgidum

 

Mistletoebird (Aru) Dicaeum hirundinaceum ignicolle

 

Mistletoebird (Mistletoebird) Dicaeum hirundinaceum hirundinaceum

 

Purple-throated Sunbird (Purple-throated) Leptocoma sperata [sperata Group]

 

Purple-throated Sunbird (Orange-lined) Leptocoma sperata juliae

 

Miombo Sunbird (Western) Cinnyris manoensis pintoi

 

Miombo Sunbird (Eastern) Cinnyris manoensis manoensis/amicorum

 

Beautiful Sunbird (Beautiful) Cinnyris pulchellus pulchellus

 

Beautiful Sunbird (Gorgeous) Cinnyris pulchellus melanogastrus

 

Shining Sunbird (Shining) Cinnyris habessinicus [habessinicus Group]

 

Shining Sunbird (Arabian) Cinnyris habessinicus hellmayri/kinneari

 

Madagascar Sunbird (Grand Comoro) Cinnyris notatus moebii

 

Madagascar Sunbird (Moheli) Cinnyris notatus voeltzkowi

 

Madagascar Sunbird (Long-billed) Cinnyris notatus notatus

 

Fork-tailed Sunbird (Fork-tailed) Aethopyga christinae latouchii/sokolovi

 

Fork-tailed Sunbird (Hainan) Aethopyga christinae christinae

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (flavissima) Motacilla flava flavissima

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (lutea) Motacilla flava lutea

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (flava) Motacilla flava flava

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (beema) Motacilla flava beema

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (iberiae) Motacilla flava iberiae

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (cinereocapilla) Motacilla flava cinereocapilla

 

Western Yellow Wagtail (pygmaea) Motacilla flava pygmaea

 

Hylocitrea (Northern) Hylocitrea bonensis bonensis

 

Hylocitrea (Southern) Hylocitrea bonensis bonthaina

 

Olive-crowned Yellowthroat (Baird’s) Geothlypis semiflava bairdi

 

Olive-crowned Yellowthroat (Olive-crowned) Geothlypis semiflava semiflava

 

Citrine Warbler (Northern) Myiothlypis luteoviridis [luteoviridis Group]

 

Citrine Warbler (Peruvian) Myiothlypis luteoviridis striaticeps

 

Citrine Warbler (Bolivian) Myiothlypis luteoviridis euophrys

 

Golden-fronted Redstart (Golden-fronted) Myioborus ornatus chrysops

 

Golden-fronted Redstart (Yellow-fronted) Myioborus ornatus ornatus

 

Ringed Warbling-Finch (Ringed) Microspingus torquatus torquatus

 

Ringed Warbling-Finch (Black-breasted) Microspingus torquatus pectoralis

 

Scarlet-bellied Mountain-Tanager (Scarlet-bellied) Anisognathus igniventris [lunulatus Group]

 

Scarlet-bellied Mountain-Tanager (Fire-bellied) Anisognathus igniventris igniventris

 

Blue-winged Mountain-Tanager (Blue-winged) Anisognathus somptuosus [somptuosus Group]

 

Blue-winged Mountain-Tanager (Bolivian) Anisognathus somptuosus flavinucha

 

Blue-and-yellow Tanager (Green-mantled) Pipraeidea bonariensis darwinii

 

Blue-and-yellow Tanager (Blue-and-yellow) Pipraeidea bonariensis [bonariensis Group]

 

Orange-eared Tanager (Orange-eared) Chlorochrysa calliparaea calliparaea/bourcieri

 

Orange-eared Tanager (Blue-throated) Chlorochrysa calliparaea fulgentissima

 

Golden-naped Tanager (Golden-naped) Tangara ruficervix [ruficervix Group]

 

Golden-naped Tanager (Rusty-naped) Tangara ruficervix [fulvicervix Group]

 

Black-headed Tanager (Black-headed) Tangara cyanoptera cyanoptera

 

Black-headed Tanager (Black-hooded) Tangara cyanoptera whitelyi

 

Lesser Antillean Tanager (St. Vincent) Tangara cucullata versicolor

 

Lesser Antillean Tanager (Grenada) Tangara cucullata cucullata

 

Blue-and-black Tanager (Blue-and-black) Tangara vassorii vassorii/branickii

 

Blue-and-black Tanager (Spot-bellied) Tangara vassorii atrocoerulea

 

Flame-faced Tanager (Flame-faced) Tangara parzudakii parzudakii/urubambae

 

Flame-faced Tanager (Yellow-faced) Tangara parzudakii lunigera

 

Cinereous Conebill (Ochraceous) Conirostrum cinereum fraseri

 

Cinereous Conebill (Cinereous) Conirostrum cinereum cinereum/littorale

 

Orange-billed Sparrow (aurantiirostris Group) Arremon aurantiirostris [aurantiirostris Group]

 

Orange-billed Sparrow (erythrorhynchus) Arremon aurantiirostris erythrorhynchus

 

Orange-billed Sparrow (spectabilis) Arremon aurantiirostris spectabilis

 

Black-capped Sparrow (Black-capped) Arremon abeillei abeillei

 

Black-capped Sparrow (Marañon) Arremon abeillei nigriceps

 

Pectoral Sparrow (Yellow-mandibled) Arremon taciturnus axillaris

 

Pectoral Sparrow (Pectoral) Arremon taciturnus taciturnus/nigrirostris

 

White-eared Ground-Sparrow (Gray-crowned) Melozone leucotis occipitalis

 

White-eared Ground-Sparrow (White-eared) Melozone leucotis leucotis/nigrior

 

Rose-breasted Chat (Rose-breasted) Granatellus pelzelni pelzelni

 

Rose-breasted Chat (Rose-bellied) Granatellus pelzelni paraensis

 

Russet-backed Oropendola (Russet-backed) Psarocolius angustifrons [angustifrons Group]

 

Russet-backed Oropendola (Green-billed) Psarocolius angustifrons oleagineus

 

Olive Oropendola (Amazonian) Psarocolius bifasciatus yuracares/neivae

 

Olive Oropendola (Para) Psarocolius bifasciatus bifasciatus

 

Blue Chaffinch (Tenerife) Fringilla teydea teydea

 

Blue Chaffinch (Gran Canaria) Fringilla teydea polatzeki

 

Antillean Euphonia (Hispaniolan) Euphonia musica musica

 

Antillean Euphonia (Puerto Rican) Euphonia musica sclateri

 

Antillean Euphonia (Lesser) Euphonia musica flavifrons

 

Brown Bullfinch (Brown) Pyrrhula nipalensis [nipalensis Group]

 

Brown Bullfinch (Malay) Pyrrhula nipalensis waterstradti

 

Reichard’s Seedeater (Stripe-breasted) Crithagra reichardi striatipectus

 

Reichard’s Seedeater (Reichard’s) Crithagra reichardi reichardi

 

Mountain Serin (Mountain) Chrysocorythus estherae [estherae Group]

 

Mountain Serin (Mindanao) Chrysocorythus estherae mindanensis

 

European Goldfinch (European) Carduelis carduelis [carduelis Group]

 

European Goldfinch (Eastern) Carduelis carduelis [caniceps Group]

 

Red-headed Weaver (Northern) Anaplectes rubriceps leuconotos

 

Red-headed Weaver (Red) Anaplectes rubriceps jubaensis

 

Red-headed Weaver (Southern) Anaplectes rubriceps rubriceps

 

Katanga Masked-Weaver (Upemba) Ploceus katangae upembae

 

Katanga Masked-Weaver (Katanga) Ploceus katangae katangae

 

Red-collared Widowbird (Red-cowled) Euplectes ardens laticauda/suahelicus

 

Red-collared Widowbird (Red-collared) Euplectes ardens ardens

 

Crimson Finch (White-bellied) Neochmia phaeton evangelinae

 

Crimson Finch (Black-bellied) Neochmia phaeton phaeton