Clements Checklist

Updates & Corrections – August 2019

2019 UPDATES and CORRECTIONS, to accompany the eBird/Clements Checklist v2019 spreadsheet
Posted 25 September 2019

The Updates and Corrections are grouped into four sections. Within each section, items are listed in the sequence in which they are encountered in the eBird/Clements Checklist v2019 spreadsheet, although we also continue to reference by page number the relevant entry in the last published edition of the Clements Checklist (6th, 2007).

The four sections are:

1  Species Рgains and losses   (posted 25 September 2019)

2¬† Orders and Families ‚Äď gains, losses, and changes to order or family composition or nomenclature¬†¬† (posted 25 September 2019)

3  Standard Updates and Correction Рall other changes, listed in sequence as they occur in the spreadsheet   (incomplete documentation posted 25 September 2019)

4¬† Groups ‚Äď a list of new groups¬†¬† (posted 25 September 2019)

SPECIES

SPECIES GAINS (splits and newly recognized species)

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Shelduck  Alopochen mauritiana

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Shelduck Alopochen mauritiana, with range “Formerly Mauritius. Extinct; likely extinct since late 1600s”. Insert Mauritius Shelduck following Egyptian Goose Alopochen aegyptiaca.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Shelduck  Alopochen kervazoi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Shelduck Alopochen mauritiana, with range “Formerly R√©union Island. Extinct; likely extinct since late 1600s”. Insert Reunion Shelduck following Egyptian Goose Alopochen aegyptiaca and Mauritius Shelduck Alopochen mauritiana.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Finsch’s Duck¬† Chenonetta finschi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Finsch’s Duck Chenonetta finschi, with range “Formerly New Zealand. Exinct, estimated to have gone extinct around 1760”. Insert Finsch’s Duck following Maned Duck Chenonetta jubata.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Amsterdam Duck  Mareca marecula

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Amsterdam Duck Mareca marecula, with range “Extinct; formerly occurred on Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands; last reported in 1793”. We classify Amsterdam Duck in Mareca (not Anas) following Olson and Jouventin (1996). Insert Amsterdam Duck following Chiloe Wigeon Mareca sibilatrix.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Amsterdam Duck  Mareca marecula

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Amsterdam Duck Mareca marecula, with range “Extinct; formerly occurred on Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands; last reported in 1793”. We classify Amsterdam Duck in Mareca (not Anas) following Olson and Jouventin (1996). Insert Amsterdam Duck following Chiloe Wigeon Mareca sibilatrix.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L., and P. Jouventin. 1996. A new species of small flightless duck from Amsterdam Island, southern Indian Ocean (Anatidae: Aves). Condor 98: 1-9.

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Duck  Anas theodori

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Duck Anas theodori, with range “Extinct; formerly occurred on Mauritius and R√©union Island”. Mauritius Duck likely became extinct between 1700 and 1710. Insert Mauritius Duck following Yellow-billed Teal Anas flavirostris.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 33, White-winged Scoter  Melanitta deglandi

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), Stejneger’s Scoter Melanitta stejnegeri is split from White-winged Scoter Melanitta deglandi, on the basis of color and pattern differences, including bill structure; tracheal differences (Miller 1926); a lack of known hybridization in areas of parapatry and co-occurrence; and a lack of rationale for the original merger by Hartert (1920).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Hartert, E. 1920. Die Vögekl der paläarktischen Fauna: Systematische Übersicht der in Europa, Nord-Asien und der mittelmeerregion vorkommenden Vögel. Heft XI-XII (Bd. II, 5-6). R. Friedländer & Sons, Berlin.

Miller, W. deW. 1926. Structural variations in the scoters. American Museum Novitates number 243.

 

page 67, Long-billed Partridge  Rhizothera longirostris

Long-billed Partridge is split, following Davison (2000), and so each of our two former monotypic groups is recognized as a species: Long-billed Partridge (Long-billed) Rhizothera longirostris longirostris becomes Long-billed Partridge Rhizothera longirostris; and Long-billed Partridge (Hose’s) Rhizothera longirostris dulitensis becomes Dulit Partridge Rhizothera dulitensis. Revise the range description for Dulit Partridge from “N Borneo (Buto Song Mountains and Sarawak)” to “local in montane northern Borneo; reported from Murud, Dulit, and Buto Song in Sarawak, and from Kinabalu in Sabah”.

Reference:

Davison, G.W.H. 2000. Notes on the taxonomy of some Bornean birds. Sarawak Museum Journal 75: 289-299.

 

page 67, Chestnut-naped Francolin  Pternistis castaneicollis

Chestnut-naped Francolin Pternistis castaneicollis is split, following Töpfer et al. (2014). The monotypic group Chestnut-naped Francolin (Chestnut-naped) Pternistis castaneicollis castaneicollis becomes Chestnut-naped Francolin Pternistis castaneicollis, and the monotypic group Chestnut-naped Francolin (Black-fronted) Pternistis castaneicollis atrifrons now is recognized as Black-fronted Francolin Pternistis atrifrons.

Reference:

Töpfer, T., L. Podsiadlowski, and K. Gedeon. 2014. Rediscovery of the Black-fronted Francolin Pternistis (casteneicollis) atrifrons (Conover, 1930) (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae) with notes on biology, taxonomy and conservation. Vertebrate Zoology 64: 261-271.

 

page 72, White Eared-Pheasant  Crossoptilon crossoptilon

White Eared-Pheasant Crossoptilon crossoptilon is split into two species, following Meyer de Schauensee (1984), MacKinnon and Phillips (2000), Rasmussen and Anderton (2005), and Li et al. (2010): the monotypic group White Eared-Pheasant (Tibetan) Crossoptilon crossoptilon harmani now is recognized as Tibetan Eared-Pheasant Crossoptilon harmani; and the polytypic group White Eared-Pheasant (White) Crossoptilon crossoptilon [crossoptilon Group] now is recognized as White Eared-Pheasant Crossoptilon crossoptilon, containing the subspecies drouynii, dolani, crossoptilon, and lichiangense.

References:

Li, X., Y. Zhu, P. Liu, Z. Zhuge, G. Su, and J. Wang. 2010. Assessment of genetic diversity in Chinese Eared Pheasant using fluorescent‚ÄźAFLP markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 429‚Äź433. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.05.024

MacKinnon, J., and K. Phillipps. 2000. A field guide to the birds of China. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Meyer de Schauensee, R. 1984. The birds of China. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Wood-Pigeon  Columba thiriouxi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Wood-Pigeon Columba thiriouxi, with range “Extinct; formerly occurred on Mauritius”. Mauritius Wood-Pigeon probably went extinct after cats and rats were introduced to the island in 1710 and 1735, respectively. Insert Mauritius Wood-Pigeon following Sao Tome Pigeon Columba malherbii.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Pigeon  Nesoenas duboisi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Pigeon Nesoenas duboisi, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island”. Reunion Pigeon may have survived as late as 1674. Insert Reunion Pigeon following Pink Pigeon Nesoenas mayeri.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Turtle-Dove  Nesoenas cicur

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Turtle-Dove Nesoenas cicur, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Mauritius”. Mauritius Turtle-Dove probably went extinct around 1720. Insert Mauritius Turtle-Dove following Pink Pigeon Nesoenas mayeri and Reunion Pigeon Nesoenas duboisi.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Turtle-Dove  Nesoenas rodericanus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Rodrigues Turtle-Dove Nesoenas rodericanus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Rodrigues Island, last observed in 1726” (Cheke 1987, Hume 2011). Insert Rodrigues Turtle-Dove following Pink Pigeon Nesoenas mayeri, Reunion Pigeon Nesoenas duboisi, and Mauritius Turtle-Dove Nesoenas cicur.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 122, Madagascar Green-Pigeon  Treron australis

Madagascar Green-Pigeon Treron australis is split, following Sinclair and Langrand (1998): the monotypic group Madagascar Green-Pigeon (Comoros) Treron australis griveaudi becomes Comoros Green-Pigeon Treron griveaudi; and the polytypic group Madagascar Green-Pigeon (Madagascar) Treron australis australis/xenius becomes Madagascar Green-Pigeon Treron australis, containing the subspecies australis and xenius.

Reference:

Sinclair, I., and O. Langrand. 1998. Birds of the Indian Ocean islands: Madagascar, Mauritius, Réunion, Rodrigues, Seychelles and the Comoros. Struik Publishers, Cape Town.

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Blue-Pigeon  Alectroenas payandeei

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Rodrigues Blue-Pigeon Alectroenas payandeei, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Rodrigues Island; probably went extinct in the late 1600s”. Insert Rodrigues Blue-Pigeon following Mauritius Blue-Pigeon Alectroenas nitidissimus.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 129, Torresian Imperial-Pigeon  Ducula spilorrhoa

Torresian Imperial-Pigeon Ducula spilorrhoa is split, following Dutson (2011) and Beehler and Pratt (2016). The monotypic group Torresian Imperial-Pigeon (Yellowish) Ducula spilorrhoa subflavescens now is recognized as Yellowish Imperial-Pigeon Ducula subflavescens; and the monotypic group Torresian Imperial-Pigeon (Torresian) Ducula spilorrhoa spilorrhoa now is recognized as Torresian Imperial-Pigeon Ducula spilorrhoa.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarcks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page (addition 2019), St. Helena Cuckoo  Nannococcyx psix

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize St. Helena Cuckoo Nannococcyx psix, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on St. Helena Island; probably went extinct in the mid 1700s”. Insert St. Helena Cuckoo following Hispaniolan Lizard-Cuckoo Coccyzus longirostris.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 177, Short-tailed Frogmouth  Batrachostomus poliolophus

Short-tailed Frogmouth Batrachostomus poliolophus is split into two species, based on differences in plumage and vocalizations (Cleere 1998). The monotypic group Short-tailed Frogmouth (Short-tailed) Batrachostomus poliolophus poliolophus now is recognized as Sumatran Frogmouth Batrachostomus poliolophus; and the monotypic group Short-tailed Frogmouth (Bornean) Batrachostomus poliolophus mixtus now is recognized as Bornean Frogmouth Batrachostomus mixtus.

Reference:

Cleere, N. 1998. Nightjars: a guide to the nightjars, nighthawks, and their relatives. Yale University Press. New Haven, Connecticut, and London.

 

page (addition 2019), Blue-throated Hillstar  Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 808B), we recognize a newly described species of hillstar, Blue-throated Hillstar Oreotrochilus cyanolaemus Sornoza-Molina, Freile, Nilsson, Krabbe, and Bonaccorso (Sornoza-Molina et al. 2018), with range “Andes of southwestern Ecuador (Cordillera de Chilla-Tioloma-Fierro Urcu, on the El Oro/Loja border)”. Insert Blue-throated Hillstar following Ecuadorian Hillstar Oreotrochilus chimborazo.

Reference:

Sornoza-Molina, F., J. F. Freile, J. Nilsson, N. Krabbe, and E. Bonaccorso. 2018. A striking, critically endangered, new species of hillstar (Trochilidae: Oreotrochilus) from the southwestern Andes of Ecuador. Auk 135: 1146-1171. https://doi.org/10.1642/AUK-18-58.1

 

page 204, Andean Hillstar  Oreotrochilus estella

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 808), we split Andean Hillstar Oreotrochilus estella into two species, following Sornoza-Molina et al. (2018): a monotypic Green-headed Hillstar Oreotrochilus stolzmanni; and a polytypic Andean Hillstar Oreotrochilus estella, containing the subspecies estella and bolivianus.

Reference:

Sornoza-Molina, F., J. F. Freile, J. Nilsson, N. Krabbe, and E. Bonaccorso. 2018. A striking, critically endangered, new species of hillstar (Trochilidae: Oreotrochilus) from the southwestern Andes of Ecuador. Auk 135: 1146-1171. https://doi.org/10.1642/AUK-18-58.1

 

page 201, Steely-vented Hummingbird  Amazilia saucerottei

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), Blue-vented Hummingbird Amazilia hoffmanni is split from Steely-vented Hummingbird Amazilia saucerottei. Blue-vented Hummingbird is separated from Steely-vented Hummingbird based on differences in vocalizations and behavior (Stiles and Skutch 1989) and on phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences that indicate that Steely-vented Hummingbird as previously constituted was a polyphyletic species (McGuire et al. 2014, Jiménez and Ornelas 2016).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Jiménez, R.A., and J.F. Ornelas. 2016. Historical and current introgression in a Mesoamerican hummingbird species complex: a biogeographic perspective. PeerJ 4: e1556.

McGuire, J.A., C.C. Witt, J.V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D.L. Rabosky, D.L. Altshuler, and R. Dudley. 2014. Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Current Biology 24: 910-916. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016

Stiles, F.G., and A.F. Skutch. 1989. A guide to the birds of Costa Rica. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Rail  Dryolimnas augusti

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Rail Dryolimnas augusti, with

range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island; last report from 1674”. Insert Reunion Rail following White-throated Rail Dryolimnas cuvieri.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Red Rail  Aphanapteryx bonasia

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Red Rail Aphanapteryx bonasia, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Mauritius”. Red Rail probably went extinct around 1700. Insert Red Rail following White-throated Rail Dryolimnas cuvieri and Reunion Rail Dryolimnas augusti.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Rail  Erythromachus leguati

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Rodrigues Rail Erythromachus leguati, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Rodrigues Island; last report from 1726”. Insert Rodrigues Rail following White-throated Rail Dryolimnas cuvieri, Reunion Rail Dryolimnas augusti, and Red Rail Aphanapteryx bonasia.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), St. Helena Crake  Atlantisia podarces

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize St. Helena Crake Atlantisia podarces (Olson 1973), with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on St. Helena Island”. St. Helena Crake probably went extinct shortly after the island was discovered in 1502. Insert St. Helena Crake following Inaccessible Island Rail Atlantisia rogersi.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 1973. Evolution of the rails of the South Atlantic Islands (Aves: Rallidae). Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 152: 1-53. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/5228

 

page (addition 2019), Ascension Crake  Mundia elpenor

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Ascension Crake Mundia elpenor (Olson 1973), with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Ascension Island; may have survived until 1815”. Insert Ascension Crake following Inaccessible Island Rail Atlantisia rogersi and St. Helena Crake Atlantisia podarces.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 1973. Evolution of the rails of the South Atlantic Islands (Aves: Rallidae). Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 152: 1-53. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/5228

 

page (addition 2019), Hawkins’s Rail¬† Diaphorapteryx hawkinsi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Hawkins’s Rail Diaphorapteryx hawkinsi, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Chatham Island; may have survived until 1895”. Insert Hawkin’s Rail following Talaud Rail Gymnocrex talaudensis.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Hodgen’s Waterhen¬† Tribonyx hodgenorum

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Hodgen’s Waterhen Tribonyx hodgenorum, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on New Zealand (North and South Islands).” Insert Hodgen’s Waterhen following Black-tailed Nativehen Tribonyx ventralis.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 85, Tristan Moorhen  Gallinula nesiotis

Tristan Moorhen Gallinula nesiotis is split into two species, based on genetic differences (Groenenberg et al. 2008). The monotypic group Tristan Moorhen (Tristan) Gallinula nesiotis nesiotis, which is extinct, now is recognized as Tristan Moorhen Gallinula nesiotis; and the monotypic group Tristan Moorhen (Gough) Gallinula nesiotis comeri now is recognized as Gough Moorhen Gallinula comeri.

Reference:

Groenenberg, D.S.J., A.J. Beintema, R.W.R.J. Dekker, and E. Gittenberger. 2008. Ancient DNA elucidates the controversy about the Flightless Island Hens (Gallinula sp.) of Tristan da Cunha. PloS ONE 3: e1835.

 

page (addition 2019), Mascarene Coot  Fulica newtonii

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mascarene Coot Fulica newtonii, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island, and possibly Mauritius”. Mascarene Coot was reported in 1672 from R√©union Island and 1693 from Mauritius. Insert Mascarene Coot following Eurasian Coot Fulica atra.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Marquesan Swamphen  Porphyrio paepae

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Marquesan Swamphen Porphyrio paepae, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Hiva Oa and Tahuata (Marquesas Islands)”. The date of extinction of Marquesan Swamphen is not known, but the species may have survived until around 1900. Insert Marquesan Swamphen following Azure Gallinule Porphyrio flavirostris.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), New Caledonian Gallinule  Porphyrio kukwiedei

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize New Caledonian Gallinule Porphyrio kukwiedei, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on New Caledonia” (Balouet and Olson 1989). The year of extinction of New Caledonian Gallinule is unknown, although a possible record from 1860 suggests it may have survived well into the 1800s. Insert New Caledonian Gallinule following Azure Gallinule Porphyrio flavirostris and Marquesan Swamphen Porphyrio paepae.

References:

Balouet, J.C., and S.L. Olson. 1989. Fossil birds from late Quaternary deposits in New Caledonia. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 469. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/5164

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Gallinule  Porphyrio caerulescens

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Gallinule Porphyrio caerulescens, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island; last reported in 1724”. Insert Reunion Gallinule following Azure Gallinule Porphyrio flavirostris, Marquesan Swamphen Porphyrio paepae, and New Caledonian Gallinule Porphyrio kukwiedei.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), St. Helena Rail  Zapornia astrictocarpus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize St. Helena Rail Zapornia astritocarpus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on St. Helena Island” (Olson 1975). St. Helena Rail probably went extinct around after the island was discovered in 1502. Insert St. Helena Rail following Baillon’s Crake Zapornia pusilla.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 1975. Paleornithology of St. Helena Island, South Atlantic Ocean. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleontology 23. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/1952

 

page (addition 2019), Miller’s Rail¬† Zapornia nigra

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Miller’s Rail Zapornia nigra, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Tahiti; last record from 1784”. Insert Miller’s Rail following Hawaiian Rail Zapornia sandwichensis.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 75, Hottentot Buttonquail  Turnix hottentottus

The two monotypic groups of Hottentot Buttonquail Turnix hottentottus are split, following Hockey et al. (2005), based on their “disjunct ranges, different habitat preferences, and different movement patterns”. The monotypic group Hottentot Buttonquail (Black-rumped) Turnix hottentottus nanus now is recognized as Black-rumped Buttontail Turnix nanus; and the monotypic group Hottentot Buttonquail (Hottentot) Turnix hottentottus hottentottus becomes Hottentot Buttonquail Turnix hottentottus.

Reference:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

 

page (addition 2019), Large St. Helena Petrel  Pterodroma rupinarum

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Large St. Helena Petrel Pterodroma rupinarum, with range “Extinct. Formerly bred on St. Helena Island”. Large St. Helena Petrel presumably went extinct shortly after the island was discovered in 1502. Insert Large St. Helena Petrel following Kerguelen Petrel Aphrodroma brevirostris.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Small St. Helena Petrel  Bulweria bifax

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Small St. Helena Petrel Bulweria bifax, with range “Extinct. Formerly bred on St. Helena Island” (Olson 1975). Small St. Helena Petrel presumably went extinct shortly after the island was discovered in 1502. Insert Small St. Helena Petrel following Jouanin’s Petrel Bulweria fallax.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 1975. Paleornithology of St. Helena Island, South Atlantic Ocean. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleontology 23. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/1952

 

page 13, Tropical Shearwater  Puffinus bailloni

The monotypic group Tropical Shearwater (Bannerman’s) Puffinus bailloni bannermani is more closely related to Townsend’s Shearwater Puffinus auricularis, Newell’s Shearwater Puffinus newelli, and Rapa Shearwater Puffinus myrtae than it is to other subspecies of Tropical Shearwater (Kawakami et al. 2018), and so is recognized as a separate species, Bannerman’s Shearwater Puffinus bannermani. Reposition Bannerman’s Shearwater to follow Hutton’s Shearwater Puffinus huttoni.

Reference:

Kawakami, K., M. Eda, H. Izumi, K. Horikoshi, and H. Suzuki. 2018. Phylogenetic position of endangered Puffinus lherminieri bannermani. Ornithological Science 17: 11-18. https://doi.org/10.2326/osj.17.11

 

page 13, Little Shearwater  Puffinus assimilis

The monotypic group Little Shearwater (Subantarctic) Puffinus assimilis elegans is elevated to species rank as Subantarctic Shearwater Puffinus elegans, following Holdaway et al. (2001), Austin et al. (2004), and Gill et al. (2010).

References:

Austin, J.J., V. Bretagnolle, and E. Pasquet. 2004. A global molecular phylogeny of the small Puffinus shearwaters and implications for systematics of the Little-Audubon’s shearwater complex. Auk 121: 847-864. ¬†https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2004)121[0847:AGMPOT]2.0.CO;2

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

Holdaway, R.N., T.H. Worthy, and A.J.D. Tennyson. 2001. A working list of breeding bird species of the New Zealand region at first human contact. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 28: 119-187. https://doi.org/10.1080/03014223.2001.9518262

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Night-Heron  Nycticorax duboisi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Night-Heron Nycticorax duboisi, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island; last reported in 1674”. Insert Reunion Night-Heron following Capped Heron Pilherodius pileatus.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Night-Heron  Nycticorax mauritianus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Night-Heron Nycticorax mauritianus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Mauritius; last reported in 1693”. Insert Mauritius Night-Heron following Capped Heron Pilherodius pileatus and Reunion Night-Heron Nycticorax duboisi.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Night-Heron  Nycticorax megacephalus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Rodrigues Night-Heron Nycticorax megacephalus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Rodrigues Island; apparently was extinct by 1761”. Insert Rodrigues Night-Heron following Capped Heron Pilherodius pileatus, Reunion Night-Heron Nycticorax duboisi, and Mauritius Night-Heron Nycticorax mauritianus.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Bermuda Night-Heron  Nyctanassa carcinocatactes

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Bermuda Night-Heron Nyctanassa carcinocatactes, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Bermuda” (Olson and Wingate 2006). Bermuda Night-Heron probably disappeared some time in the 1600s after human colonization. Insert Bermuda Night-Heron following Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Nyctanassa violacea.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L., and D.B. Wingate. 2006. A new species of night-heron (Ardeidae: Nyctanassa) from Quaternary deposits on Bermuda. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 119: 326-337.  https://doi.org/10.2988/0006-324X(2006)119[326:ANSONA]2.0.CO;2

 

page 25, Black-faced Ibis  Theristicus melanopis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 822), Black-faced Ibis Theristicus melanopis is split into two species, in part following Vizcarra (2009, 2010) and Collar and Bird (2011): the monotypic group Black-faced Ibis (melanopis) Theristicus melanopis melanopis now is recognized as Black-faced Ibis Theristicus melanopis; and the monotypic group Black-faced Ibis (branickii) Theristicus melanopis branickii now is recognized as Andean Ibis Theristicus branickii.

References:

Collar, N.J., and J.P. Bird. 2011. Phenotypic discrimination of the Andean Ibis. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 123: 459-463. https://doi.org/10.1676/10-162.1

Vizcarra, J.K. 2009. Observaciones de Theristicus melanopis melanopis y Theristicus melanopis branickii en el Distrito de Ite, sur del Per√ļ. Bolet√≠n Chileno de Ornitolog√≠a 15: 104-110.

Vizcarra, J.K. 2010. Descubrimiento de dos sitios de anidamiento de Theristicus melanopis melanopis en Tacna, sur de Per√ļ. Cotinga 32: 111-112.

 

page 24, Sacred Ibis  Threskiornis aethiopicus

Sacred Ibis Threskiornis aethiopicus is split into two species, following Cramp (1977) and Safford and Hawkins (2013): the monotypic group Sacred Ibis (African) Threskiornis aethiopicus aethiopicus now is recognized as African Sacred Ibis Threskiornis aethiopicus; and the polytypic group Sacred Ibis (Malagasy) Threskiornis aethiopicus bernieri/abbotti now is recognized as Madagascar Sacred Ibis Threskiornis bernieri.

References:

Cramp, S. (chief editor). 1977. Handbook of the birds of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. The birds of the Western Palearctic. Volume 1. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Safford, R., and F. Hawkins (editors). 2013. The birds of Africa. Volume VIII. The Malagasy region. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 35, Barred Honey-buzzard  Pernis celebensis

Genetic evidence indicates that Barred Honey-buzzard Pernis celebensis is not monophyletic (Gamauf and Haring 2005); therefore each of the two monotypic groups is recognized as a separate species: Barred Honey-buzzard (Barred) Pernis celebensis celebensis now is recognized as Sulawesi Honey-buzzard Pernis celebensis; and Barred Honey-buzzard (Steere’s) Pernis celebensis steerei now is recognized as Philippine Honey-buzzard Pernis steerei.

We add a previously overlooked subspecies, winkleri Gamauf and Preleuthner 1998, with range “Philippines (Luzon, Polillo, Catanduanes, Marinduque, and Sibuyan)”. Insert subspecies winkleri immediately following the species heading for Philippine Honey-buzzard.

With the addition of subspecies winkleri, Phiilippine Honey-buzzard no longer is monotypic. Add an entry for the nominate subspecies, and revise the range description for nominate steeri from “Philippine Islands (except Palawan)” to “Philippines (except for Luzon, Polillo, Catanduanes, Marinduque, Sibuyan, Cebu, and Palawan)”.

References:

Gamauf, A., and E. Haring. 2005. Phylogeny of Old World Perninae (Accipitridae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Zoologische Mededelingen 79: 175‚Äď177. https://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/42199

Gamauf, A., and M. Preleuthner. 1998. A new taxon of the Barred Honeybuzzard Pernis celebensis from the Philippines. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 118: 90-101.

 

page 39, Eastern Marsh-Harrier  Circus spilonotus

Eastern Marsh-Harrier Circus spilonotus is split into two species, following Simmons (2000) and Ferguson-Lees and Christie (2001): the monotypic group Eastern Marsh-Harrier (Eastern) Circus spilonotus spilonotus now is recognized as Eastern Marsh-Harrier Circus spilonotus; and the monotypic group Eastern Marsh-Harrier (Papuan) Circus spilonotus spilothorax now is recognized as Papuan Marsh-Harrier Circus spilothorax.

References:

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

Simmons, R.E. 2000. Harriers of the world. Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom.

 

page 39, Reunion Harrier  Circus maillardi

Reunion Harrier Circus maillardi is split into two species, following Simmons (2000), Wink and Sauer-G√ľrth (2000), and Safford and Hawkins (2013). As a result, we now recognize the monotypic group Reunion Harrier (Reunion) Circus maillardi maillardi as Reunion Harrier Circus maillardi; and the monotypic group Reunion Harrier (Malagasy) Circus maillardi macrosceles now is recognized as Madagascar Harrier Circus macrosceles.

References:

Safford, R., and F. Hawkins (editors). 2013. The birds of Africa. Volume VIII. The Malagasy region. Christopher Helm, London.

Simmons, R.E. 2000. Harriers of the world. Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Wink, M., and H. Sauer-G√ľrth. 2000. Advances in the molecular systematics of African raptors. Pages 135-147 in R.D. Chancellor and B.-U. Meyburg (editors), Raptors at risk. Hancock House.

 

page (addition 2019), Bermuda Hawk  Bermuteo avivorus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Bermuda Hawk Bermuteo avivorus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Bermuda”. Probably went extinct some time before 1623. Insert Bermuda Hawk following White-browed Hawk Leucopternis kuhli.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 164, Sulawesi Scops-Owl  Otus manadensis

Sulawesi Scops-Owl Otus manadensis is split into three species. The monotypic group Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Siau) Otus manadensis siaoensis now is recognized as a species, Siau Scops-Owl Otus siaoensis, following Lambert and Rasmussen (1998); and the monotypic group Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Sula) Otus manadensis sulaensis also is recognized as a species, Sula Scops-Owl Otus sulaensis, following Lambert and Rasmussen (1998) and König and Weick (2008). Sulawesi Scops-Owl Otus manadensis now contains three subspecies, each of which is recognized as a monotypic group: Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Sulawesi) Otus manadensis manadensis; Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Banggai) Otus manadensis mendeni; and Sulawesi Scops-Owl (Kalidupa) Otus manadensis kalidupae.

References:

König, C., and F. Weick. 2008. Owls of the world. Second edition. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

Lambert, F.R., and P.C. Rasmussen. 1998. A new scops owl from Sangihe Island, Indonesia. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 118: 204‚Äď217.

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Scops-Owl  Otus grucheti

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize an extinct species of owl from Réunion Island. Previously known as Reunion Owl Mascarenotus grucheti, we add this species as Reunion Scops-Owl Scops grucheti, following Louchart et al. (2018). Reunion Scops-Owl likely went extinct around 1610. Insert Reunion Scops-Owl following Mayotte Scops-Owl Otus mayottensis.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Louchart, A., F. Bastian, M. Baptista, P. Guarino-Vignon, J.P. Hume, C. Jacot-des-Combes, C. Mourer-Chauvir√©, C. H√§nni, and M. Ollivier. 2018. Ancient DNA reveals the origins, colonization histories, and evolutionary pathways of two recently extinct species of giant scops owl from Mauritius and Rodrigues Islands (Mascarene Islands, south‚Äźwestern Indian Ocean). Journal of Biogeography 45: 2678-2689. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13450

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Scops-Owl  Otus murivorus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize an extinct species of owl from Rodrigues Island. Previously known as Rodrigues Owl Mascarenotus murivorus, we add this species as Rodrigues Scops-Owl Scops murivorus, following Louchart et al. (2018). The last record of Rodrigues Scops-Owl is from 1726. Insert Rodrigues Scops-Owl following Mayotte Scops-Owl Otus mayottensis and Reunion Scops-Owl Otus grucheti.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Louchart, A., F. Bastian, M. Baptista, P. Guarino-Vignon, J.P. Hume, C. Jacot-des-Combes, C. Mourer-Chauvir√©, C. H√§nni, and M. Ollivier. 2018. Ancient DNA reveals the origins, colonization histories, and evolutionary pathways of two recently extinct species of giant scops owl from Mauritius and Rodrigues Islands (Mascarene Islands, south‚Äźwestern Indian Ocean). Journal of Biogeography 45: 2678-2689. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13450

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Scops-Owl  Otus sauzieri

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize an extinct species of owl from Mauritius.

Previously known as Mauritius Owl Mascarenotus sauzieri, we add this species as Mauritius Scops-Owl Scops sauzieri, following Louchart et al. (2018). Mauritius Scops-Owl was last reported in 1837. Insert Mauritius Scops-Owl following Mayotte Scops-Owl Otus mayottensis, Reunion Scops-Owl Otus grucheti, and Rodrigues Scops-Owl Otus murivorus.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Louchart, A., F. Bastian, M. Baptista, P. Guarino-Vignon, J.P. Hume, C. Jacot-des-Combes, C. Mourer-Chauvir√©, C. H√§nni, and M. Ollivier. 2018. Ancient DNA reveals the origins, colonization histories, and evolutionary pathways of two recently extinct species of giant scops owl from Mauritius and Rodrigues Islands (Mascarene Islands, south‚Äźwestern Indian Ocean). Journal of Biogeography 45: 2678-2689. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13450

 

page (addition 2019), Bermuda Saw-whet Owl  Aegolius gradyi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Bermuda Saw-whet Owl Aegolius gradyi, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Bermuda” (Olson 2012). Bermuda Saw-whet Owl probably went extinct some time between 1610 and 1623. Insert Bermuda Saw-whet Owl following Northern Saw-whet Owl Aegolius acadicus.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 2012. A new species of small owl of the genus Aegolius (Aves: Strigidae) from Quaternary deposits on Bermuda. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 125: 97-105. https://doi.org/10.2988/11-36.1

 

page 174, Southern Boobook  Ninox novaeseelandiae

Southern Boobook Ninox novaeseelandiae is split into two species, following Schodde and Mason (1997) and Wink et al. (2008). The English name Southern Boobook now applies to Ninox boobook, which includes the monotypic groups Southern Boobook (Alor) Ninox boobook plesseni; Southern Boobook (Rote) Ninox boobook rotiensis; Southern Boobook (Timor) Ninox boobook fusca; and Southern Boobook (Red) Ninox boobook lurida; and the polytypic group Southern Boobook (Boobook) Ninox boobook [boobook Group], containing the subspecies moae, cinnamomina, remigialis, pusilla, ocellata, and boobook. The second species is Morepork Ninox novaeseelandiae, which includes the monotypic group Morepork (Tasmanian) Ninox novaeseelandiae leucopis; and the polytypic group Morepork (novaeseelandiae Group) Ninox novaeseelandiae [novaeseelandiae Group], consisting of the subspecies albaria, undulata, and novaeseelandiae.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Southern Boobook (Alor) from Ninox novaeseelandiae plesseni to Ninox boobook plesseni.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Southern Boobook (Roti) from Ninox novaeseelandiae rotiensis to Ninox boobook rotiensis, and change the English name to Southern Boobook (Rote). Revise the range description from “Roti (Lesser Sundas)” to “Rote (Lesser Sundas)”.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Southern Boobook (Timor) from Ninox novaeseelandiae fusca to Ninox boobook fusca.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Southern Boobook (Boobook) from Ninox novaeseelandiae [boobook Group] to Ninox boobook [boobook Group], and change the English name to Southern Boobook (Australian).

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Southern Boobook (Red) from Ninox novaeseelandiae lurida to Ninox boobook lurida.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Ninox novaeseelandiae leucopsis from Southern Boobook (Tasmanian) to Morepork (Tasmanian).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Ninox novaeseelandiae [novaeseelandiae Group] from Southern Boobook (Morepork) to Morepork (novaeseelandiae Group).

References:

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1997. Aves (Columbidae to Coraciidae). Volume 37.2 in W.W.K. Houston and A. Wells (editors), Zoological Catalogue of Australia. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

Wink, M., P. Heidrich, H. Sauer-G√ľrth, A.-A. Elsayed, and J. Gonzalez. 2008. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of owls (Strigiformes). Pages 42-63 in C. K√∂nig and F. Weick, Owls of the world. Second edition. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

page (addition 2019), St. Helena Hoopoe  Upupa antaios

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize St. Helena Hoopoe Upupa antaios, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on St. Helena Island” (Olson 1975). St. Helena Hoopoe probably went extinct shortly after the island was discovered in 1502. Insert St. Helena Hoopoe following Madagascar Hoopoe Upupa marginata.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 1975.  Paleornithology of St. Helena Island, South Atlantic Ocean. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleontology 23. https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/1952

 

page 223, Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher  Tanysiptera sylvia

Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher Tanysiptera sylvia is split into two species, following Dutson (2011) and Beehler and Pratt (2016). The polytypic group Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher (Buff-breasted) Tanysiptera sylvia sylvia/salvadoriana now is recognized as Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher Tanysiptera sylvia, containing subspecies salvadoriana and sylvia; and the polytypic group Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher (Black-capped) Tanysiptera sylvia nigriceps/leucura now is recognized as Black-capped Paradise-Kingfisher Tanysiptera nigriceps, containing subspecies leucura and nigriceps.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia. The Bismarcks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher Helm, London.

 

page 227, Indian Roller  Coracias benghalensis

Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis is split into two species, following Johansson et al. (2018). The polytypic group Indian Roller (Indian) Coracias benghalensis benghalensis/indicus now is recognized as Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis, containing the subspecies benghalensis and indicus; and the monotypic group Indian Roller (Black-billed) Coracias benghalensis affinis now is recognized as Indochinese Roller Coracias affinis.

Reference:

Johansson, U.S, M. Irestedt, Y. Qu, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2018. Phylogenetic relationships of rollers (Coraciidae) based on complete mitochondrial genomes and fifteen nuclear genes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 17‚Äď22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.030

 

page 239, Golden-throated Barbet  Psilopogon franklinii

Golden-throated Barbet Psilopogon franklinii is split into two species, following Den Tex and Leonard (2013). The polytpic group Golden-throated Barbet (White-eared) Psilopogon franklinii franklinii/ramsayi now is recognized as Golden-throated Barbet Psilopogon franklinii, containing the subspecies franklinii and ramsayi; and the monotypic group Golden-throated Barbet (Violet-eared) Psilopogon franklinii auricularis now is recognized as Necklaced Barbet Psilopogon auricularis, which is monotypic.

Reference:

Den Tex, R.-J., and J.A. Leonard. 2013. A molecular phylogeny of Asian barbets: speciation and extinction in the tropics. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 68: 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2013.03.004

 

page 260, Black-rumped Flameback  Dinopium benghalense

Black-rumped Flameback is split into two species, following Fernando et al. (2016): a polytypic Black-rumped Flameback, containing the subspecies benghalense, dilutum, tehminae, puncticolle, and jaffnense (equivalent to the former polytypic group Black-rumped Flameback (Black-rumped) Dinopium benghalense [benghalense Group], which now is deleted); and a monotypic Red-backed Flameback Dinopium psarodes.

Revise the range description for subspecies dilutum from “Pakistan” to “Pakistan and northwestern India”.

Subspecies tehminae Whistler and Kinnear 1934, previously considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies puncticolle, is recognized, following Ripley (1982) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). Insert tehminae immediately following dilutum, with range “southwestern India (Western Ghats)”.

Revise the range description for subspecies puncticolle from “Central and s India; n Sri Lanka” to “southern India, except for the Western Ghats”.

Subspecies jaffnense Whistler 1944, previously considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies puncticolle, is recognized, following Ripley (1982) and Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). Insert jaffnense immediately following puncticolle, with range “northern Sri Lanka”.

References:

Fernando, S.P., D.E. Irwin, and S.S. Seneveratne. 2016. Phenotypic and genetic analysis support distinct species status of the Red-backed Woodpecker (Lesser Sri Lanka Flameback: Dinopium psarodes) of Sri Lanka. Auk 133: 497-511. https://dx.doi.org/10.1642/AUK-15-233.1

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 259, Eurasian Green Woodpecker  Picus viridis

Eurasian Green Woodpecker Picus viridis is split into two species, following Fuchs et al. (2008), Pons et al. (2011), and Perktas et al. (2011); see also Vaurie (1965). Eurasian Green Woodpecker Picus viridis now consists of the polytypic group Eurasian Green Woodpecker (Eurasian) Picus viridis viridis/karelini, and the monotypic group Eurasian Green Woodpecker (Mesopotamian) Picus viridis innominatus; and the monotypic group Eurasian Green Woodpecker (Iberian) Picus viridis sharpei now is recognized as a separate species, Iberian Green Woodpecker Picus sharpei.

References:

Fuchs, J., J.-M. Pons, P.G.P. Ericson, C. Bonillo, A. Couloux, and E. Pasquet. 2008. Molecular support for a rapid cladogenesis of the woodpecker clade Malarpicini, with further insights into the genus Picus (Piciformes: Picinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48: 34-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2008.03.036

Perktas, U., G.F. Barrowclough, and J.G. Groth. 2011. Phylogeography and species limits in the green woodpecker complex (Aves: Picidae): multiple Pleistocene refugia and range expansion across Europe and the Near East. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 104: 710-723. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2011.01750.x

Pons, J.M., G. Olioso, C. Cruaud, and J. Fuchs. 2011. Phylogeography of the Eurasian green woodpecker (Picus viridis). Journal of Biogeography 38: 311‚Äď325. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2010.02401.x

Vaurie, C. 1965. The birds of the Palearctic fauna. Non-Passeriformes. H.F. & G. Witherby Limited, London.

 

page (addition 2019), Bermuda Flicker  Colaptes oceanicus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Bermuda Flicker Colaptes oceanicus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Bermuda” (Olson 2013). Bermuda Flicker may have survived until at least 1623. Insert Bermuda Flicker following Gilded Flicker Colaptes chrysoides.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L. 2013. Fossil woodpeckers from Bermuda with the description of a new species of Colaptes (Aves: Picidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 126: 17-24. https://doi.org/10.2988/0006-324X-126.1.17

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Kestrel  Falco duboisi

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Reunion Kestrel Falco duboisi, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island; may have survived until the 1670s” (Cowles 1994). Insert Reunion Kestrel following Seychelles Kestrel Falco araeus.

References:

Cowles, G.S. 1994. A new genus, three new species and two new records of extinct Holocene birds from R√©union Island, Indian Ocean. Geobios 27: 87‚Äď93.

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Oceanic Parrot  Eclectus infectus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Oceanic Parrot Eclectus infectus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on the Tonga Archipelago, including Vanuatu and possibly Fiji” (Steadman 2006). Oceanic Parrot perhaps survived until the late 18th century. Insert Oceanic Parrot following Eclectus Parrot Eclectus roratus.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Steadman, D.W. 2006. A new species of extinct parrot (Psittacidae: Eclectus) from Tonga and Vanuatu, South Pacific. Pacific Science 60: 137-145. https://doi.org/10.1353/psc.2005.0061

 

page (addition 2019), Mauritius Gray Parrot  Lophopsittacus bensoni

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Mauritius Gray Parrot Lophopsittacus bensoni, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Mauritius and R√©union Island; last record from 1759”. Insert Mauritius Gray Parrot following Long-tailed Parakeet Psittacula longicauda.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Broad-billed Parrot  Lophopsittacus mauritianus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Broad-billed Parrot Lophopsittacus mauritianus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Mauritius; last record from between 1673-1675”. Insert Broad-billed Parrot following Long-tailed Parakeet Psittacula longicauda and Mauritius Gray Parrot Lophopsittacus bensoni.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Rodrigues Parrot  Necopsittacus rodricanus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Rodrigues Parrot Necropsittacus rodricanus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Rodrigues Island; last observed in 1761”. Insert Rodrigues Parrot following Long-tailed Parakeet Psittacula longicauda, Mauritius Gray Parrot Lophopsittacus bensoni, and Broad-billed Parrot Lophopsittacus mauritianus.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

pages 132-132, Rainbow Lorikeet  Trichoglossus haematodus

Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus is split into the following six species, following Schodde and Mason (1997; see also Braun et al. 2017):

Sunset Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni), including subspecies mitchellii, forsteni, djampeanus, and stresemanni;

a monotypic Leaf Lorikeet Trichiglossus weberi;

Marigold Lorikeet Trichoglossus capistratus, including subspecies fortis, flavotectus, and capistratus;

Coconut Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus, including subspecies rosenbergii, haematodus, nigrogularis, massena, nesophilus, flavicans, and deplanchii;

a monotypic Red-collared Lorikeet Trichoglossus rubritorquis; and

Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus molucannus, including subspecies septentrionalis and molucannus.

The sequence of subspecies of Sunset Lorikeet is revised.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Trichoglossus haematodus rosenbergii from Rainbow Lorikeet (Biak) to Coconut Lorikeet (Biak).

In Rainbow Lorikeet, we recognize subspecies septentrionalis Robinson 1900, following Schodde and Mason (1997); previously we considered this subspecies to be a junior synonym of nominate molucannus. Position septentrionalis immediately following the species heading for Rainbow Lorikeet, with range “northeastern Australia (Cape York Peninsula); also islands in the Torres Strait”.

Revise the range description for nominate moluccanus from “E and se Australia (Cape York to Eyre Pen., South Australia)” to “eastern Australia, from northeastern Queensland (south of the Endeavour-Daintree Rivers) south to Victoria, and west to southeastern South Australia, including the Eyre Peninsula and Kangaroo Island. Introduced in Western Australia (Perth)”.

References:

Braun, M.P., M. Reinschmidt, T. Datzmann, D. Waugh, R. Zamora, A. H√§bich, L. Neves, H. Gerlach, T. Arndt, C. Mettke-Hofmann, H. Sauer-G√ľrth, and M. Wink. 2017. Influences of oceanic islands and the Pleistocene on the biogeography and evolution of two groups of Australian parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes: Eclectus roratus, Trichoglossus haematodus complex). Rapid evolution and implications for taxonomy and conservation. European Journal of Ecology 3: 47-66. https://doi.org/10.1515/eje-2017-0014

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1997. Aves (Columbidae to Coraciidae). Volume 37.2 in W.W.K. Houston and A. Wells (editors), Zoological Catalogue of Australia. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

 

page 141, Brown-necked Parrot  Poicephalus robustus

Brown-necked Parrot Poicephalus robustus is split into two species, following Hockey et al. (2005) and Coetzer et al. (2015): a polytypic Brown-necked Parrot Poicephalus fuscicollis, containing subspecies fuscicollis and suahelicus; and a monotypic Cape Parrot Poicephalus robustus.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Brown-necked Parrot (Brown-necked) from Poicephalus robustus fuscicollis to Poicephalus fuscicollis fuscicollis.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Brown-necked Parrot (Gray-headed) from Poicephalus robustus suahelicus to Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus.

References:

Coetzer, W.G., C.T. Downs, M.R. Perrin, and S. Willows-Munro. 2015. Molecular systematics of the Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus): implications for taxonomy and conservation. PLoS ONE 10: e0133376.

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

 

page (addition 2019), Martinique Parrot  Amazona martinicana

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Martinique Parrot Amazona martinicana,

with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Martinique; last reported in 1779”. Insert Martinique Parrot following Red-necked Parrot Amazona arausiaca.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Guadeloupe Parrot  Amazona violacea

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Guadeloupe Parrot Amazona violacea, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Guadeloupe; last reported in 1779”. Insert Guadeloupe Parrot following Imperial Parrot Amazona imperialis.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 143, Green Parakeet  Psittacara holochlorus

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), the monotypic group Green Parakeet (Socorro) Psittacara holochlorus brevipes now is recognized as a separate species, Socorro Parakeet Psittacara brevipes, based on vocal (Howell and Webb 1995), morphological (Martínez-Gomez et al. 2017), and genetic (Schweizer et al. 2014, Urantowka et al. 2014, Martínez-Gomez et al. 2017) differences.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Howell, S.N.G., and S. Webb. 1995. A guide to the birds of Mexico and northern Central America. Oxford University Press, New York.

Martínez-Gómez, J.E., N. Matías-Ferrer, and P. Escalante-Pliego. 2017. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the Socorro parakeet (Psittacara holochlorus brevipes): recent speciation with minor morphological differentiation. Journal of Ornithology 158: 965-978. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-017-1465-4

Schweizer, M., S. T. Hertwig, and O. Seehausen. 2014. Diversity versus disparity and the role of ecological opportunity in a continental bird radiation. Journal of Biogeography 41: 1301-1312. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12293

Urantowka, A. D., A. M. Kroczak, and T. StrzaŇāa. 2014. Complete mitochondrial genome of endangered Socorro Conure (Aratinga brevipes)-taxonomic position of the species and its relationship with Green Conure. Mitochondrial DNA 25: 365-367. https://doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2013.803095

 

page (addition 2019), Guadeloupe Parakeet  Psittacara labati

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2014), we recognize Guadeloupe Parakeet Psittacara labati, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Guadeloupe; probably became extinct sometime in the late 1700s”. Insert Guadeloupe Parakeet following Puerto Rican Parakeet Psittacara maugei.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 1. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 286, Lesser Woodcreeper  Xiphorhynchus fuscus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 809), Lesser Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus fuscus is split into two species, following Cabanne et al. (2008, 2014) and García et al. (2018): a monotypic Ceara Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus atlanticus, and a polytypic Lesser Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus fuscus, containing the subspecies pintoi, tenuirostris, and fuscus. Note that the English name for Xiphorhynchus atlanticus is provisional, pending adoption of an English name by SACC (see Proposal 834).

References:

Cabanne, G. S., F.M. d’Horta, E.H.R. Sari, F.R. Santos, and C.Y. Miyaki. 2008. Nuclear and mitochondrial phylogeography of the Atlantic forest endemic Xiphorhynchus fuscus (Aves: Dendrocolaptidae): biogeography and systematics implications. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 49: 760-773. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2008.09.013

Cabanne, G.S., N. Trujillo-Arias, L. Calder√≥n, F.M. D’Horta, and C.Y. Miyaki. 2014. Phenotypic evolution of an Atlantic Forest passerine (Xiphorhynchus fuscus): biogeographic and systematic implications. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 113: 1047-1066. https://doi.org/10.1111/bij.12362

García, N.C., L. Naka, and G.S. Cabanne. 2018. Vocal variation in relation to genetic structure in an Atlantic forest woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus fuscus): evolutionary and taxonomic implications. Journal of Ornithology 159: 379-388. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-017-1509-9

 

page 320, Highland Elaenia  Elaenia obscura

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 806 and Proposal 813), Highland Elaenia is split into two species, following Rheindt et al. (2008a) and Tang et al. (2018): Highland Elaenia Elaenia obscura and Small-headed Elaenia Elaenia sordida. Position Small-headed Elaenia to follow Mottle-backed Elaenia Elaenia gigas.

References:

Rheindt, F.E., L. Christidis, and J.A. Norman. 2008a. Habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of a Neotropical flycatcher lineage from forest and open landscapes. BMC Evolutionary Biology 8: 1193.

Tang, Q., S.V. Edwards, and F.E. Rheindt. 2018. Rapid diversification and hybridization have shaped the dynamic history of the genus Elaenia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 127: 522-533. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.05.008

 

page 321, Sierran Elaenia  Elaenia pallatangae

Sierran Elaenia Elaenia pallatangae is split into two species, on the basis of genetic evidence that our two polytypic groups are not sister taxa (Rheindt et al. 2008a, Rheindt et al. 2009, Tang et al. 2009); see also AOS-SACC Proposal 812. The polytypic group Sierran Elaenia (Roraiman) Elaenia pallatangae olivina/davidwillardi now is recognized as Tepui Elaenia Elaenia olivina, containing the subspecies olivina and davidwillardi; and the polytypic group Sierran Elaenia (Andean) Elaenia pallatangae [pallatangae Group] now is recognized as Sierran Elaenia Elaenia pallatangae, containing the subspecies pallatangae, intensa, and exsul. Position Tepui Elaenia to follow Mountain Elaenia Elaenia frantzii.

References:

Rheindt, F.E., L. Christidis, and J.A. Norman. 2008a. Habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of a Neotropical flycatcher lineage from forest and open landscapes. BMC Evolutionary Biology 8: 1193.

Rheindt, F., L. Christidis, and J.A. Norman. 2009. Genetic introgression, incomplete lineage sorting and faulty taxonomy create multiple cases of polyphyly in a montane clade of tyrant-flycatchers (Elaenia, Tyrannidae). Zoologica Scripta 38: 143-153. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00369.x

Tang, Q., S.V. Edwards, and F.E. Rheindt. 2018. Rapid diversification and hybridization have shaped the dynamic history of the genus Elaenia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 127: 522-533. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.05.008

 

page 586, Flame Bowerbird  Sericulus aureus

Flame Bowerbird Sericulus aureus is split, following Beehler and Pratt (2016). The monotypic group Flame Bowerbird (Masked) Sericulus aureus aureus now is recognized as Masked Bowerbird Sericulus aureus; and the monotypic group Flame Bowerbird (Flame) Sericulus aureus ardens now is recognized as Flame Bowerbird Sericulus ardens.

Reference:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 563, Black-faced Friarbird  Philemon moluccensis

Black-faced Friarbird Philemon moluccensis is split into two species, following Rheindt and Hutchinson (2007) and Higgins et al. (2008). The monotypic group Black-faced Friarbird (Black-faced) Philemon moluccensis moluccensis now is recognized as Buru Friarbird Philemon moluccensis; and the monotypic group Black-faced Friarbird (Tanimbar) Philemon moluccensis plumigenis now is recognized as Tanimbar Friarbird Philemon plumigenis.

References:

Rheindt, F.E., and R.O. Hutchinson. 2007. A photospot odyssey through the confused avian taxonomy of Seram and Buru (southern Moluccas). BirdingAsia 7: 18-38.

Higgins, P.J., L. Christidis, and H.A. Ford. 2008. Family Meliphagidae (honeyeaters). Pages 498-691 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 13. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 519, Rufous Fieldwren  Calamanthus campestris

Rufous Fieldwren Calamanthus campestris is split into two species, following Schodde and Mason (1999): a polytypic Rufous Fieldwren Calamanthus campestris, containing subspecies winiam, campestris, rubiginosus, hartogi, dorrie, wayensis, and isabellinus; and a monotypic Western Fieldwren Calamanthus montanellus.

Reference:

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1999. The directory of Australian birds. Passerines. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra.

 

page 514, Blue Jewel-babbler  Ptilorrhoa caerulescens

Blue Jewel-babbler Ptilorrhoa caerulescens is split into two species, following Boles (2007) and Beehler and Pratt (2016): a polytypic Blue Jewel-babbler Ptilorrhoa caerulescens, containing subspecies caerulescens, neumanni, and nigricrissus; and a monotypic Dimorphic Jewel-babbler Ptilorrhoa geislerorum.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Boles, W.E. 2007. Family Eupetidae (jewel-babblers and allies). Pages 348-373 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 374, White-bellied Minivet  Pericrocotus erythropygius

White-bellied Minivet Pericrocotus erythropygius is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005); consequently the monotypic group White-bellied Minivet (White-bellied) Pericrocotus erythropygius erythropygius now is recognized as White-bellied Minivet Pericrocotus erythropygius; and the monoptypic group White-bellied Minivet (Jerdon’s) Pericrocotus erythropygius albifrons now is recognized as Jerdon’s Minivet Pericrocotus albifrons.

Reference:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 370, Ashy Cuckooshrike  Coracina cinerea

Ashy Cuckooshrike Coracina cinerea is split into two species, following Sinclair and Langrand (1998); consequently the monotypic group Ashy Cuckooshrike (Comoros) Coracina cinerea cucullata now is recognized as Comoros Cuckooshrike Coracina cucullata, containing subspecies cucullata and moheliensis; and the polytypic group Ashy Cuckooshrike (Madagascar) Coracina cinerea cinerea/pallida now is recognized as Madagascar Cuckooshrike Coracina cinerea, containing subspecies cinerea and pallida.

We add a previously overlooked subspecies of Comoros Cuckooshrie, moheliensis Benson 1960, with range “Comoro Islands (Moh√©li)”. Insert moheliensis immediately following nominate cucullata.

With the addition of subspecies moheliensis, revise the range description for nominate cucullata from “Comoro Islands (Grand Comoro and Moh√©li)” to “Comoro Islands (Grande Comoro)”.

Reference:

Sinclair, I., and O. Langrand. 1998. Birds of the Indian Ocean islands: Madagascar, Mauritius, Réunion, Rodrigues, Seychelles and the Comoros. Struik Publishers, Cape Town.

 

page 523, Varied Sittella  Daphoenositta chrysoptera

Varied Sittella Daphoenositta chrysoptera is split into two species, following Beehler and Pratt (2016): consequently the polytypic group Varied Sittella (Papuan) Daphoenositta chrysoptera [papuensis Group] now is recognized as Papuan Sittella Daphoenositta papuensis, containing the subspecies papuensis, wahgiensis, toxopeusi, intermedia, alba, and albifrons; and the five monotypic groups, Varied Sittella (White-winged) Daphoenositta chrysoptera leucoptera, Varied Sittella (Striated) Daphoenositta chrysoptera striata, Varied Sittella (White-headed) Daphoenositta chrysoptera leucocephala, Varied Sittella (Orange-winged) Daphoenositta chrysoptera chrysoptera, and Varied Sittella (Black-capped) Daphoenositta chrysoptera pileata, are all retained in a polytypic Varied Sittella Daphoenositta chrysoptera.

Reference:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 487, Little Shrikethrush  Colluricincla megarhyncha

Subspecies melanorhyncha, previously classified as a subspecies of Little Shrikethrush Colluricincla megarhyncha (in the group Little Shrikethrush (Arafura) Colluricincla megarhyncha [megarhyncha Group]), in fact is a whistler (Pachycephala) (Marki et al. 2018; see also Beehler and Pratt 2016). Recognize melanorhyncha as a species, Biak Whistler Pachycephala melanorhyncha, and insert it immediately following Island Whistler Pachycephala phaionota.

Subspecies goodsoni is removed from the polytypic group Little Shrikethrush (Arafura) Colluricincla megarhyncha [megarhyncha Group], and is placed in the polytypic group Little Shrikethrush (Rufous) Colluricincla megarhyncha [rufogaster Group]. Position goodsoni to immediately follow the heading for the group Little Shrikethrush (Rufous).

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Marki, P.Z., J. Fjelds√•, M. Irestedt, and K.A. J√łnsson. 2018. Molecular phylogenetics and species limits in a cryptically coloured radiation of Australo-Papuan passerine birds (Pachycephalidae: Colluricincla). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 124: 100-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.02.029

 

page 488, Variable Pitohui  Pitohui kirhocephalus

Variable Pitohui Pitohui kirhocephalus is split into three species, following Beehler and Pratt (2016), based on Dumbacher et al. (2008): the polytypic group Variable Pitohui (Raja Ampat) Pitohui kirhocephalus cerviniventris/pallidus now is recognized as Raja Ampat Pitohui Pitohui cerviniventris, containing the subspecies cerviniventris and pallidus; the polytypic group Variable Pitohui (Northern) Pitohui kirhocephalus [kirhocephalus Group] now is recognized as Northern Variable Pitohui Pitohui kirhocephalus, containing the subspecies decipiens, kirhocephalus, dohertyi, rubiensis, brunneivertex, jobiensis, meyeri, senex, and brunneicaudus; and the polytypic group Variable Pitohui (Southern) Pitohui kirhocephalus [uropygialis Group] now is recognized as Southern Variable Pitohui uropygialis, containing the subspecies uropygialis, aruensis, nigripectus, brunneiceps, and meridionalis.

Subspecies salvadorii, with range “NW New Guinea (Geelvink Bay region)”, represents a population composed of intergrades between kirhocephalus and dohertyi of Northern Variable Pitohui (Mayr 1967a, Beehler and Pratt 2016), and is deleted. Revise the range description for nominate kirhocephalus from “Coastal ne New Guinea (Vogelkop to Geelvink Bay)” to “coastal northeastern New Guinea (Vogelkop to Geelvink Bay)”.

Subspecies stramineipectus, with range “SW New Guinea (Triton Bay region)”; adiensis, with range “Adi Island (off s coast of Onin Peninsula, sw New Guinea)”; and carolinae, with range “SW New Guinea (Etna Bay region)”, all are considered to be junior synonyms of subspecies rubiensis of Northern Variable Pitohui (Beehler and Pratt 2016), and are deleted. Revise the range description for rubiensis from “NW New Guinea (head of Geelvink Bay)” to “northwestern New Guinea (head of Geelvink Bay south to Triton Bay and Etna Bay); also Adi Island (off southern coast of the Bomberai Peninsula)”.

Subspecies tibialis, with range “NW New Guinea (western half of Vogelkop Peninsula)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate uropygialis of Southern Variable Pitohui (Beehler and Pratt 2016), and is deleted. Revise the range description for nominate uropygialis from “Salawati and Misool islands (New Guinea)” to “northwestern New Guinea (western half of the Bird’s Head Peninsula, and Salawati and Misool islands to the west)”.

References:

Beehler, B.M., and T.K. Pratt. 2016. Birds of New Guinea: distribution, taxonomy, and systematics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Dumbacher, J.P., K. Deiner, L. Thompson, and R.C. Fleischer. 2008. Phylogeny of the avian genus Piohui and the evolution of toxicity in birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 49: 774-781. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2008.09.018

Mayr, E. 1967. Subfamily Pachycephalinae, whistlers or thickheads. Pages 3-51 in R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editor), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XII. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

page 467, Black-headed Batis  Batis minor

Black-headed Batis Batis minor is split into two species, following Louette (2005): a polytypic Western Black-headed Batis Batis erlangeri, containing the subspecies erlangeri and congoensis; and a polytypic Eastern Black-headed Batis Batis minor, containing the subspecies minor and suahelica.

Following Louette (2005), we recognize subspecies congoensis Newmann 1907, previously considered to be a junior synonym of nominate erlangeri of Western Black-headed Batis, with range “Gabon and southern Congo south to northern Angola, and east to southwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo”. Position congoensis immediately following nominate erlangeri.

With the addition of subspecies congoensis, revise the range description for nominate erlangeri from “Ethiopian Plateau and Somalia to Cameroon and Angola” to “southeastern Nigeria and Cameroon east to southern Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia, and south to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, northwestern Tanzania, and western Kenya”.

Reference:

Louette, M. 2005. Western Black-headed Batis Batis erlangeri: a separate species consisting of two subspecies. Bulletin of the African Bird Club 12: 99-105.

 

page 577, Square-tailed Drongo  Dicrurus ludwigii

Square-tailed Drongo Dicrurus ludwigii is split into three species (one of which is newly described). Subspecies sharpei, with range “Senegal to northwestern Angola, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern South Sudan, Uganda and western Kenya”, is more closely related to Shining Drongo Dicrurus atripennis than to other subspecies of Square-tailed Drongo (Fuchs et al. 2017, 2018c). In turn, sharpei includes two deeply divergent genetic lineages (Fuchs et al. 2017, 2018c). The western lineage is described as a new species, Western Square-tailed Drongo Dicrurus occidentalis Fuchs, Douno, Bowie, and Fjelds√• (Fuchs et al. 2018c), with range “Senegal to Nigeria (west of the Niger River)”. The populations in the remainder of the range of sharpei are recognized as Sharpe’s Drongo Dicrurus sharpei, with range “central Africa, from Nigeria (east of the Niger River, south of the Benue River) east to Uganda, South Sudan, and western Kenya, and south to northwestern Angola and southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo”. The third species is Common Square-tailed Drongo Dicrurus ludwigii, which contains the subspecies saturnus, muenzneri, tephrogaster, and ludwigii. As a result, the polytypic groups Square-tailed Drongo (Saturnine) Dicrurus ludwigii sharpei/saturnus and Square-tailed Drongo (Square-tailed) Dicrurus ludwigii [ludwigii Group] are deleted.

References:

Fuchs, J., J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2017. Diversification across major biogeographic breaks in the African Shining/Square-tailed Drongos complex (Passeriformes: Dicruridae). Zoologica Scripta 46: 27-41. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12191

Fuchs, J., M. Douno, R.C.K. Bowie, and J. Fjeldså. 2018c. Taxonomic revision of the Square-tailed Drongo species complex (Passeriformes: Dicruridae) with description of a new species from western Africa. Zootaxa 4438: 105-127. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4438.1.4

 

page 578, Fork-tailed Drongo  Dicrurus adsimilis

Fork-tailed Drongo Dicrurus adsimilis is split into two species, following Fuchs et al. (2017, 2018a): Fork-tailed Drongo Dicrurus adsimilis, which consists of the subspecies apivorus, jubaensis (newly recognized), fugax, and adsimilis; and the monotypic group Fork-tailed Drongo (Glossy-backed) Dicrurus adsimilis divaricatus now is recognized as Glossy-backed Drongo Dicrurus divaricatus, containing nominate divaricatus and the newly recognized subspecies lugubris.

Revise the range description for subspecies apivorus, of Fork-tailed Drongo, from “Angola, s Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia, Namibia, Botswana, and n Cape Prov.” to “southeastern Gabon and adjacent Republic of the Congo, southern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, northern and western Zambia, Namibia, Botswana, and northern South Africa (northern Northern Cape to Limpopo)”.

Following Fuchs et al. (2018a), we recognize subspecies jubaensis van Someren 1931, of Fork-tailed Drongo, with range “Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia”. Insert jubaensis immediately following the heading for the group Fork-tailed Drongo (adsimilis Group) Dicrurus adsimilis [adsimilis Group].

Revise the range of nominate divaricatus, of Glossy-backed Drongo, from “southwestern Mauritania, Senegal, and Gambia east to northern Cameroon, Chad, Central African Republic, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southern Sudan, South Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, northern Uganda, and northern Kenya” to “southwestern Mauritania south to Guinea, east to southeastern Niger and northeastern Nigeria (Lake Chad)”.

Following Fuchs et al. (2018a), the name lugubris, previously considered to be a junior synonym of divaricatus of Glossy-backed Drongo, now is applied to the populations from “southwestern Chad (Lake Chad) east to Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia, south to northern Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Uganda, and northern Kenya”.

References:

Fuchs, J., J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2017. Diversification across major biogeographic breaks in the African Shining/Square-tailed Drongos complex (Passeriformes: Dicruridae). Zoologica Scripta 46: 27-41. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12191

Fuchs, J., D.H. De Swardt, G. Oatley, J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2018a. Habitat-driven diversificaton, hybridization and cryptic diversity in the Fork-tailed Drongo (Passeriformes: Dicruridae: Dicrurus adsimilis). Zoologica Scripta 47: 266-284. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12274

 

page 578, Velvet-mantled Drongo  Dicrurus modestus

Velvet-mantled Drongo is split into two species, following Fuchs et al. (2017, 2018a, 2018c): a monotypic Fanti Drongo Dicrurus atactus, and a polytypic Velvet-mantled Drongo Dicrurus modestus, containing the subspecies modestus and coracinus.

References:

Fuchs, J., J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2017. Diversification across major biogeographic breaks in the African Shining/Square-tailed Drongos complex (Passeriformes: Dicruridae). Zoologica Scripta 46: 27-41. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12191

Fuchs, J., D.H. De Swardt, G. Oatley, J. Fjeldså, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2018a. Habitat-driven diversificaton, hybridization and cryptic diversity in the Fork-tailed Drongo (Passeriformes: Dicruridae: Dicrurus adsimilis). Zoologica Scripta 47: 266-284. https://doi.org/10.1111/zsc.12274

 

page 475, Black-throated Shrikebill  Clytorhynchus nigrogularis

Black-throated Shrikebill Clytorhynchus nigrogularis is split into two species, following Dutson (2006). Consequently the monotypic group Black-throated Shrikebill (Black-throated) Clytorhynchus nigrogularis nigrogularis now is recognized as Black-throated Shrikebill Clytorhynchus nigrogularis; and the monotypic group Black-throated Shrikebill (Santa Cruz) Clytorhynchus nigrogularis sanctaecrucis now is recognized as Santa Cruz Shrikebill Clytorhynchus sanctaecrucis.

Reference:

Dutson G. 2006. The Pacific shrikebills (Clytorhynchus) and the case for species status for the form sanctaecrucis. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 126: 299-308.

 

page 593, Slender-billed Crow  Corvus enca

The monotypic group Slender-billed Crow (Violet) Corvus enca violaceus is elevated to species rank as Violet Crow Corvus violaceus, based on genetic evidence that it is not closely related to other subspecies of Slender-billed Crow (J√łnsson et al. 2012b).

Reference:

J√łnsson, K.A., P.-H. Fabre, and M. Irestedt. 2012b. Brains, tools, innovation and biogeography in crows and ravens. BMC Evolutionary Biology 12: 72.

 

page 480, New Zealand Robin  Petroica australis

New Zealand Robin Petroica australis is split into two species, following Miller and Lambert (2006) and Gill et al. (2010). Consequently the monotypic group New Zealand Robin (North I.) Petroica australis longipes now is recognized as North Island Robin Petroica longipes; and the polytypic group New Zealand Robin (South I.) Petroica australis australis/rakiura now is recognized as a polytypic South Island Robin Petroica australis, containing the subspecies australis and rakiura.

References:

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

Miller, H.C., and D.M. Lambert. 2006. A molecular phylogeny of New Zealand’s Petroica (Aves: Petroicidae) species based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 40: 844-855. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2006.04.012

 

page 480, Pacific Robin  Petroica multicolor

Pacific Robin Petroica multicolor is split into two species, based on evidence that nominate multicolor is not closely related to the other subspecies of Pacific Robin (Kearns et al. 2016, 2019). Consequently the polytypic group Pacific Robin (Pacific) Petroica multicolor [pusilla Group] now is recognized as a polytypic Pacific Robin Petroica pusilla, containing the subspecies septentrionalis, kulambangrae, dennisi, polymorpha, soror, ambrynensis, feminina, cognata, tannensis, similis, kleinschmidti, taveunensis, becki, and pusilla; and the monotypic group Pacific Robin (Norfolk) Petroica multicolor multicolor now is recognized as a monotypic Norfolk Robin Petroica multicolor.

We recognize three new groups in Pacific Robin: a polytypic group Pacific Robin (Solomons) Petroica pusilla [polymorpha Group], containing the subspecies septentrionalis, kulambangrae, dennisi, and polymorpha; a polymorphic group Pacific Robin (Vanuatu) Petroica pusilla [pusilla Group], containing the subspecies soror, ambrynensis, feminina, cognata, tannensis, similis, kleinschmidti, taveunensis, becki, and pusilla; and a monotypic group Pacific Robin (Samoan) Petroica pusilla pusilla.

We add a recently described subspecies, tannensis Kearns and Omland 2015, with range “Vanuatu (Tanna)” (Kearns et al. 2015). Insert subspecies tannensis immediately following subspecies cognata.

With the addition of subspecies tannensis, revise the range description for subspecies similis from “Vanuatu (Tanna and Aneityum)” to “Vanuatu (Aneityum)”.

References:

Kearns, A.M., L.C. White, J.J. Austin, and K.E. Omland. 2015. Distinctiveness of Pacific Robin subspecies in Vanuatu revealed from disparate patterns of sexual dichromatism, plumage colouration, morphometrics and ancient DNA. Emu 115: 89-98. https://doi.org/10.1071/MU14076

Kearns, A.M., L. Joseph, L.C. White, J.J. Austin, C. Baker, A.C. Driskell, J.F. Malloy, and K.E. Omland. 2016. Norfolk Island Robins are a distinct endangered species: ancient DNA unlocks surprising relationships and phenotypic discordance within the Australo-Pacific Robins. Conservation Genetics 17: 321-335. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-015-0783-4

Kearns, A.M., J.F. Malloy, M.K. Gobbert, A. Theirry, L. Joseph, A.C. Driskell, and K.E. Omland. 2019. Nuclear introns help unravel the diversification history of the Austalo-Pacific Petroica robins. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution: 131: 48-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.10.024

 

page 353, Blanford’s Lark¬† Calandrella blanfordi

The polytypic group Blanford’s Lark (eremica/daaroodensis) Calandrella blanfordi eremica/daaroodensis is split, following Stervander et al. (2016), and now is recognized as Rufous-capped Lark Calandrella eremica, with subspecies eremica and daaroodensis.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Calandrella blanfordi blanfordi from Blanford’s Lark (blanfordi) to Blanford’s Lark (Blanford’s). Revise the range description for this group from “Highlands of Ethiopia” to “Eritrea and northern Ethiopia”.

Reference:

Stervander, M., P. Alstr√∂m, U. Olsson, U. Ottosson, B. Hansson, and Staffan Bensch. 2016. Multiple instances of paraphyletic species and cryptic taxa revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear RAD data for Calandrella larks (Aves: Alaudidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 102: 233‚Äď245. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.05.032

 

page 424, Miombo Wren-Warbler  Calamonastes undosus

Miombo Wren-Warbler Calamonastes undosus is split into two species, following Hockey et al. (2005) and Ryan (2006). We now recognize the polytypic group Miombo Wren-Warbler (Miombo) Calamonastes undosus [undosus Group] as Miombo Wren-Warbler Calamonastes undosus, containing the subspecies cinereus, katangae, huilae, and undosus; and we recognize the polytypic group Miombo Wren-Warbler (Stierling’s) Calamonastes undosus [stierlingi Group] as Stierling’s Wren-Warbler Calamonastes stierlingi, containing the subspecies stierlingi, olivascens, irwini, and pintoi.

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Ryan, P.G. 2006. Family Cisticolidae (cisticolas and allies). Pages 378-490 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 424, Green-backed Camaroptera  Camaroptera brachyura

The monotypic group Green-backed Camaroptera (Hartert’s) Camaroptera brachyura harterti is elevated to species rank as Hartert’s Camaroptera Camaroptera harteri, following Ryan et al. (2006).

Reference:

Ryan, P.G. 2006. Family Cisticolidae (cisticolas and allies). Pages 378-490 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 422, Bar-throated Apalis  Apalis thoracica

Bar-throated Apalis Apalis thoracica is split into four species, following Ryan (2006). The monotypic group Bar-throated Apalis (Taita) Apalis thoracica fuscigularis now is recognized as Taita Apalis Apalis fuscigularis; the monotypic group Bar-throated Apalis (Yellow-throated) Apalis thoracica flavigularis now is recognized as Yellow-throated Apalis Apalis flavigularis; and the monotypic group Bar-throated Apalis (Namuli) Apalis thoracica lynesi now is recognized as Namuli Apalis Apalis lynesi. With the removal of these three groups from Bar-throated Apalis, the polytypic group Bar-throated Apalis (Bar-throated) Apalis thoracica [thoracica Group] no longer is needed, and is deleted.

Reference:

Ryan, P.G. 2006. Family Cisticolidae (cisticolas and allies). Pages 378-490 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 423, Chestnut-throated Apalis  Apalis porphyrolaema

Chestnut-throated Apalis Apalis porphyrolaema is split into two species, following Ryan (2006). We now recognize the monotypic group Chestnut-throated Apalis (Kabobo) Apalis porphyrolaema kaboboensis as Kabobo Apalis Apalis kaboboensis, and the polytypic group Chestnut-throated Apalis (Chestnut-throated) Apalis porphyrolaema porphyrolaema/affinis now is recognized as Chestnut-throated Apalis Apalis porphyrolaema, containing the subspecies affinis and porphyrolaema.

Reference:

Ryan, P.G. 2006. Family Cisticolidae (cisticolas and allies). Pages 378-490 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 416, Winding Cisticola  Cisticola galactotes

Winding Cisticola Cisticola galactotes is split into five species, following Hockey et al. (2005) and Ryan (2006). The polytypic group Winding Cisticola (Winding) Cisticola galactotes [marginatus Group] now is recognized as Winding Cisticola Cisticola marginatus, containing the subspecies amphilectus, zalingei, marginatus, nyansae, and suahelicus; the monotypic group Winding Cisticola (Ethiopian) Cisticola galactotes lugubris now is recognized as Ethiopian Cisticola Cisticola lugubris; the monotypic group Winding Cisticola (Coastal) Cisticola galactotes haematocephala now is recognized as Coastal Cisticola Cisticola haematocephalus (note the change in the spelling of the species name); the monotypic group Winding Cisticola (Luapula) Cisticola galactotes luapula now is recognized as Luapula Cisticola Cisticola luapula; and the polytypic group Winding Cisticola (Rufous-winged) Cisticola galactotes [galactotes Group] now is recognized as Rufous-winged Cisticola Cisticola galactotes, containing the subspecies isodactylus (newly recognized) and galactotes.

Subspecies schoutedeni, with range “W Zambia”, and subspecies stagnans, with range “Caprivi Strip and adjacent s Zambia and w Zimbabwe”, both of which we previously included in the group Winding Cisticola (Rufous-winged) Cisticola galactotes [galactotes Group], are considered to be junior synonyms of Luapula Cisticola Cisticola luapula (Ryan 2006), and are deleted. Revise the range description for Luapula Cisticola from “N Zambia (Lake Mweru and Lake Bangweulu basin)” to “northern and northeastern Namibia, eastern Angola, southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, Zambia (except the northeast), northern Botswana, and northwestern Zimbabwe”.

We add a previously overlooked subspecies of Rufous-winged Cisticola, isodactylus Peters 1868, with range “southern Malawi, Mozambique, and extreme southeastern Zimbabwe”. Insert isodactylus immediately following the heading for the species.

Revise the range description for nominate galactotes (Rufous-winged Cisticola) from “SE Zimbabwe and South Africa” to “southern Mozambique and the east coast of South Africa”.

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Ryan, P.G. 2006. Family Cisticolidae (cisticolas and allies). Pages 378-490 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 11. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 442, Tawny Grassbird  Megalurus timoriensis

As is detailed below (under Standard Updates and Corrections), Tawny Grassbird is reassigned to the genus Cincloramphus. Also, Tawny Grassbird is split into two species, following Schodde and Mason (1999). Consequently the polytypic group Tawny Grassbird (Tawny) [timoriensis Group] Megalurus timoriensis [timoriensis Group] now is recognized as Tawny Grassbird Cincloramphus timoriensis, containing the subspecies tweeddalei, mindorensis, alopex, crex, celebensis, amboinensis, inquirendus, timoriensis, muscalis, and alisteri; and the polytypic group Tawny Grassbird (Papuan) [macrurus Group] Megalurus timoriensis [macrurus Group] now is recognized as Papuan Grassbird Cincloramphus macrurus, containing the subspecies mayri, interscapularis, stresemanni, harterti, wahgiensis, alpinus, and macrurus.

Subspecies montanus, of Papuan Grassbird, with range “Central Highlands of New Guinea (Mt. Hagen and Mt. Wilhelm)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies alpinus (Dickinson and Christidis 2014), and is deleted. Revise the range description for alpinus from “Alpine grasslands of Snow Mountains to se New Guinea” to “alpine grasslands in west central and eastern New Guinea, including the Snow Mountains, the Telefomin area, the Central Highlands (Mt. Giluwe, Mt. Hagen, and Mt, Wilhelm) and the Wharton Range”.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1999. The directory of Australian birds. Passerines. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra.

 

page 379, Eastern Mountain-Greenbul  Arizelocichla nigriceps

Eastern Mountain-Greenbul Arizelocichla nigriceps is split into four species, following Roy et al. (1998) and Sinclair and Ryan (2003). Eastern Mountain Greenbul (note that we drop the hyphen) now is restricted to the monotypic group Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Olive-breasted) Arizelocichla nigriceps kikuyuensis and the polytypic group Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Mountain) Arizelocichla nigriceps [nigriceps Group], containing the subspecies nigriceps and usambarae; the monotypic group Eastern Mountain-Greenbul (Uluguru) Arizelocichla nigriceps neumanni now is recognized as Uluguru Mountain Greenbul Arizelocichla neumanni; the monotypic group Eastern Mountain-Greenbul (Yellow-throated) Arizelocichla nigriceps chlorigula now is recognized as Yellow-throated Mountain Greenbul Arizelocichla chlorigula; and the monotypic group Eastern Mountain-Greenbul (Black-browed) Arizelocichla nigriceps fusciceps now is recognized as Black-browed Mountain Greenbul Arizelocichla fusciceps.

Subspecies kungwensis, formerly included in the group Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Mountain) Arizelocichla nigriceps [nigriceps Group], instead belongs with Shelley’s Greenbul Arizelocichla masukuensis (Turner and Pearson 2015).

Delete the hypen in the English name Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Olive-breasted) for the monotypic group Arizelocichla nigriceps kikuyuensis.

Delete the hypen in the English name Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Mountain), and change the scientific name from Arizelocichla nigriceps [nigriceps Group] to Arizelocichla nigriceps nigriceps/usambarae.

References:

Roy, M.S., P. Arctander, and J. Fjeldså. 1998. Speciation and taxonomy of montane greenbuls of the genus Andropadus (Aves: Pycnonotidae). Steenstrupia 24: 51-66.

Sinclair, I., and P. Ryan. 2003. Birds of Africa south of the Sahara. Struik Nature, Cape Town.

Turner, D.A., and D.J. Pearson. 2015. Systematic and taxonomic issues concerning some East African bird species, notably those where treatment varies between authors. Scopus 34: 1-23.

 

page 377, Orange-spotted Bulbul  Pycnonotus bimaculatus

Orange-spotted Bulbul Pycnonotus bimaculatus is split into two species, following Eaton and Collar (2015) and Eaton et al. (2016): Aceh Bulbul Pycnonotus snouckaerti, which is monotypic; and Orange-spotted Bulbul Pycnonotus bimaculatus, which contains the subspecies bimaculatus and tenggerensis.

References:

Eaton, J.A., and N.J. Collar. 2015. The taxonomic status of Pycnonotus bimaculatus snouckaerti. Forktail 31: 107‚Äď110.

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Cream-eyed Bulbul  Pycnonotus pseudosimplex

We add a recently described species, Cream-eyed Bulbul Pycnonotus pseudosimplex Shakya, Lim, Moyle, Rahman, Lakim, and Sheldon 2019, with range “Borneo (confirmed from Sarawak, Sabah, and northeastern Kalimantan, but probably is more widespread)” (Skakya et al. 2019). Position Cream-eyed Bulbul immediately following Ashy-fronted Bulbul Pycnonotus cinereifrons.

Reference:

Shakya, S.B., H.C. Lim, R.G. Moyle, M.A. Rahman, M. Lakim, and F.H. Sheldon. 2019. A cryptic new species of bulbul from Borneo. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 139: 46-55.

 

page 384, Ashy Bulbul  Hemixos flavala

Ashy Bulbul Hemixos flavala is split into two species, following Fishpool and Tobias (2005) and Shakya and Sheldon (2017). Consequently the polytypic group Ashy Bulbul (Ashy) Hemixos flavala [flavala Group] now is recognized as Ashy Bulbul Hemixos flavala, containing the subspecies flavala, hildebrandi, davisoni, bourdellei, and remotus (note this is a revised sequence for these subspecies); and the two monotypic groups Ashy Bulbul (Cinereous) Hemixos flavala cinereus and Ashy Bulbul (Green-winged) Hemixos flavala connectens, are recognized as a separate species, Cinereous Bulbul Hemixos cinereus, with two monotypic groups, Cinereous Bulbul (Cinereous) Hemixos cinereus cinereus and Cinereous Bulbul (Green-winged) Hemixos cinereus connectens.

Subspecies remotus is removed from the polytypic group Ashy Bulbul (Ashy) Hemixos flavala [flavala Group] and now is recognized as a new monotypic group, Ashy Bulbul (Brown-backed) Hemixos flavala remotus.

References:

Fishpool, L.D.C., and J.A. Tobias. 2005. Family Pycnonotidae (bulbuls). Pages 124-250 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 10. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Shakya, S.B., and F.H. Sheldon. 2018. The phylogeny of the world’s bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) inferred using a supermatrix approach. Ibis 159: 498-509. https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12464

 

page (addition 2019), Rote Leaf Warbler  Phylloscopus rotiensis

We add a recently described species, Rote Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus rotiensis Ng, Prawiradilaga, Ng, Suparno, Ashari, Trainor, Verbelen, and Rheindt 2018, with range “Rote (Lesser Sundas)” (Ng et al. 2018). Position Rote Leaf Warbler immediately following Timor Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus presbytes.

Reference:

Ng, N.S.R., D.M. Prawiradilaga, E.Y.X. Ng, Suparno, H. Ashari, C. Trainor, P. Verbelen, and F.R. Rheindt. 2018. A striking new species of leaf warbler from the Lesser Sundas as uncovered through morphology and genomics. Scientific Reports 8: 15646. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-34101-7

 

page 496, African Hill Babbler  Sylvia abyssinica

The monotypic group African Hill Babbler (Rwenzori) Sylvia abyssinica atriceps is elevated to species rank as Rwenzori Hill Babbler Sylvia atriceps, following Collar and Robson (2007).

Reference:

Collar, N.J., and C. Robson. 2007. Family Timaliidae (babblers). Pages 70-291 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 12. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 550, Abyssinian White-eye  Zosterops abyssinicus

Abyssinian White-eye Zosterops abyssinicus is split into two species, following Cox et al. (2014; see also Pearson and Turner 2017): a polytypic Abyssinian White-eye Zosterops abyssinicus, containing the subspecies arabs, abyssinicus, omoensis, and socotranus; and a polytypic Pale White-eye Zosterops flavilateralis, containing the subspecies flavilateralis and jubaensis.

The polytypic group Abyssinian White-eye (Abyssinian) Zosterops abyssinicus [abyssinicus Group] is partitioned into two groups: a polytypic group Abyssinian White-eye (Abyssinian) Zosterops abyssinicus [abyssinicus Group], containing the subspecies arabs, abyssinicus, and omoensis; and a monotypic group Abyssinian White-eye (Socotra) Zosterops abyssinicus socotranus.

References:

Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys‚ÄźJones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day. 2014. Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white‚Äźeyes (Aves: Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology 23: 4103-4118. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12840

Pearson, D.J., and D.A. Turner. 2017. A taxonomic review of the genus Zosterops in East Africa, with a revised list of species occurring in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Scopus 37: 1-13.                                https://www.ajol.info/index.php/scopus/article/view/150534

 

page 550, Broad-ringed White-eye   Zosterops poliogastrus

Broad-ringed White-eye Zosterops poliogastrus is split into six species, following Cox et al. (2014; see also Pearson and Turner 2017): a monotypic Mbulu White-eye Zosterops mbuluensis; a monotypic Taita White-eye Zosterops silvanus; a monotypic South Pare White-eye Zosterops winifredae; a polytypic Heuglin’s White-eye Zosterops poliogastrus, containing the subspecies poliogastrus, kaffensis, and kulalensis (each of which also is recognized as a separate monotypic group); a monotypic Kikuyu White-eye Zosterops kikuyuensis; and a monotypic Kilimanjaro White-eye Zosterops eurycricotus.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Zosterops poliogastrus poliogastrus from Broad-ringed White-eye (Ethiopian) to Heuglin’s White-eye (Ethiopian).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Zosterops poliogastrus kaffensis from Broad-ringed White-eye (Kaffa) to Heuglin’s White-eye (Kaffa).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Zosterops poliogastrus kulalensis from Broad-ringed White-eye (Kulal) to Heuglin’s White-eye (Kulal).

References:

Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys‚ÄźJones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day. 2014. Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white‚Äźeyes (Aves: Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology 23: 4103-4118. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12840

Pearson, D.J., and D.A. Turner. 2017. A taxonomic review of the genus Zosterops in East Africa, with a revised list of species occurring in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Scopus 37: 1-13.                                https://www.ajol.info/index.php/scopus/article/view/150534

 

page 551, Oriental White-eye  Zosterops palpebrosus

page 551, Everett’s White-eye¬† Zosterops everetti

page 552, Ashy-bellied White-eye  Zosterops citrinella

As is detailed below, five subspecies ‚Äď melanurus, buxtoni, williamsoni, unicus, and auriventer ‚Äď are removed from Oriental White-eye; thus, Zosterops palpebrosus is restricted to subspecies occidentis, palpebrosus, nilgiriensis, salimalii, egregius, siamensis, and nicobaricus. Following the removal of the eastern subspecies from Zosterops palpebrosus, change the English name of Zosterops palpebrosus from Oriental White-eye to Indian White-eye. The ranges and sequence of subspecies of Indian White-eye are revised, although the subspecies ranges should be considered provisional, pending a proper review of geographic variation in this species.

We recognize subspecies occidentis Ticehurst 1927, with range “northeastern Afghanistan east to western Himalayas, and northern and central India”, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) and Dickinson and Christidis (2014). Insert subspecies occidentus immediately following the species heading for Indian White-eye.

Subspecies joannae La Touche 1921, with range “SW China”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate palpebrosus (van Balen 2008), and is deleted. Revise the range description for nominate palpebrosus from “Nepal to se Tibet, sw China, Myanmar, n Thailand and Indochina” to “central and eastern Himalayas east to southern China (Sichuan, Yunnan) and Myanmar; isolated populations on Mahawt Island, Oman, and in southern Iran have been assigned to nominate palpebralis, although this requires confirmation “.

Revise the range description for subspecies nilgiriensis from “S India (Nilgiri and Palani hills)” to “western India (Western Ghats); most populations elsewhere in southern peninsular India are more or less similar”.

Revise the range description for subspecies egregius from “Afghanistan to Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka and Laccadive Is.” to “Sri Lanka”.

Subspecies siamensis Blyth 1867, which we previously considered to be a junior synonym of nominate palpebrosus, is reinstated (van Balen 2008), with range “southern Myanmar east through Indochina”.

—–

Subspecies auriventer, previously assigned to Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus, with range “southern Myanmar, west coast and southeastern coast of Thai-Malay Peninsula, Natuna and Bangka Islands, and western Borneo”, is restricted to southeastern Myanmar (Wells 2017a). Other taxa that are similar to auriventer, and are inferred to be conspecfic (Wells 2017b), are subspecies wetmorei and tahanensis, previously classified as subspecies of Everett’s White-eye Zosterops everetti, and medius, previously considered to be a junior synonym of tahanensis (Wells 2017b). These four taxa are recognized as a separate species, Hume’s White-eye Zosterops auriventer (Wells 2017a, 2017b). Thus Everett’s White-eye now contains only subspecies everetti, basilanicus, boholensis, siquijorensis, mandibularis, and babelo, and is restricted to the Philippines (including the Sulu Archipelago) and the Talaud Islands.

Make the following revisions to the subspecies of Hume’s White-eye:

Revise the range description of nominate auriventer from “southern Myanmar, west coast and southeastern coast of Thai-Malay Peninsula, Natuna and Bangka Islands, and western Borneo” to “poorly known; documented only from southeastern Myanmar”.

Change the scientific name of wetmorei from Zosterops everetti wetmorei to Zosterops auriventer wetmorei. Revise the range description for subspecies wetmorei from “S Thailand” to “southern Thailand and the northern Thai-Malay Peninsula”. Reposition wetmorei to precede, rather than follow, tahanensis.

Change the scientific name of tahanensis from Zosterops everetti tahanensis to Zosterops auriventer tahanensis. Revise the range description for subspecies tahanensis from “Thai-Malay Peninsula and northern Borneo” to “southern Thai-Malay Peninsula”.

We add subspecies medius Robinson and Kloss 1923, with range “Borneo” (Wells 2017b); previously medius was considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies tahanensis.

—–

Subspecies melanurus and buxtoni are sister to one another, but are not related to other subspecies of Zosterops palpebrosus (“Oriental White-eye”, now Indian White-eye); these two subspecies are split as a separate species, Sangkar White-eye Zosterops melanurus (Lim et al. 2019).

Change the scientific name of buxtoni from Zosterops palpebrosus buxtoni to Zosterops melanurus buxtoni. Subspecies sumatranus, previously classified as a subspecies of Zosterops palpebrosus, is considered to be a junior synonym of buxtoni (Mayr 1967b), and is deleted. Note, however, that although sumatranus was described from Sumatra, Lim et al. (2019) question whether buxtoni in fact occurs on Sumatra; rather, they suspect that the population on Sumatra may be more closely related to Hume’s White-eye. Revise the range description for buxtoni from “Mts. of e Sumatra and w Java” to “western Java; a population on Sumatra also has been assigned to buxtoni, but the identification of Sumatran birds as buxtoni has been questioned”.

Change the scientific name of melanurus from Zosterops palpebrosus melanurus to Zosterops melanurus melanurus.

—–

Subspecies williamsoni in turn is related to populations included in another newly recognized species, Swinhoe’s White-eye Zosterops simplex (Round et al. 2017; see also Lim et al. 2019), and is transferred to that species. More information on Swinhoe’s White-eye is presented below, in the account for Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus.

—–

Subspecies unicus of Zosterops palpebrosus (“Oriental White-eye”, now Indian White-eye) is closely related to Ashy-bellied White-eye Zosterops citrinella (Lim et al. 2019), and is transferred to that species. Position unicus immediately following the heading for the species Ashy-bellied White-eye. Change the scientific name from Zosterops palpebrosus unicus to Zosterops citrinella unicus.

In the range description of nominate citrinella, change the spelling of Roti to Rote.

Reposition subspecies harterti to precede (rather than follow) subspecies albiventris.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Lim, B.T.M., K.R. Sadanandan, C. Dingle, Y.Y. Leung, D.M. Prawiradilaga, M. Irham, H. Ashari, J.G.H. Lee, and F.R. Rheindt. 2019. Molecular evidence suggests radical revision of species limits in the great speciator white-eye genus Zosterops. Journal of Ornithology 160: 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1583-7

Mayr, E. 1967b. Family Zosteropidae, White-eyes. Indo-Australian taxa. Pages 289-326 in R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editor), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume XII. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Round, P.D., S. Manawattana, J. Khudamrongsawat, S. Thunhikorn, M. Safoowong, and T. Bhummakasikara. 2017. Disentangling avian diversity: South-East Asian mainland Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus constitutes two distinct lineages. Forktail 33: 103-115.

van Balen, S. 2008. Family Zosteropidae (white-eyes). Pages 402-485 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 13. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Wells, D.R. 2017a. Zosterops white-eyes in continental South-East Asia. 1: proposed refinements to the regional definition of Oriental White-eye Z. palpebrosus. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 137: 100-109.

Wells, D.R. 2017b. Zosterops white-eyes in continental South-East Asia. 2: what is Zosterops auriventer Hume? Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 137: 110-116.

 

page 551, Japanese White-eye  Zosterops japonicus

page 551, Enggano White-eye  Zosterops salvadorii

page 552, Mountain White-eye  Zosterops montanus

Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus contains two unrelated genetic groups (Round et al. 2017, Lim et al. 2019), and so is split into two species, Zosterops japonicus and Zosterops simplex. Furthermore, the polytypic Mountain White-eye Zosterops montanus is embedded within one of these species (Lim et al. 2019), and the monotypic Enggano White-eye Zosterops salvadorii is embedded within the second (Lim et al. 2019).

Change the English name of Zosterops japonicus from Japanese White-eye to Warbling White-eye; this species now includes subspecies japonicus, stejnegeri, insularis, loochooensis, alani, and daitoensis of Japanese White-eye, and subspecies obstinatus, montanus, difficilis, parkesi, whiteheadi, diuatae, vulcani, pectoralis, and halconensis of Mountain White-eye. (Subspecies gilli, previously classified as a subspecies of Mountain White-eye, now is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate meyeni Lowland White-eye, following Mees 2006, and is deleted.)

Assign the English name Swinhoe’s White-eye to Zosterops simplex; this species consists of subspecies simplex and hainanus, formerly of Zosterops japonicus, as well as subspecies williamsoni (previously Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus williamsoni), newly recognized subspecies erwini (previously considered to be a junior synonym of auriventer, now Hume’s White-eye Zosterops auriventer), and subspecies salvadorii (previously Enganno White-eye).

Make the following changes to the subspecies of Warbling White-eye Zosterops japonicus:

Subspecies yesoensis, with range “Hokkaido (n Japan)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate japonicus (van Balen 2008), and is deleted. Revise the range description for nominate japonicus from “Main Japanese islands (Honshu to Kyushu)” to “southern Sakhalin Island, Japan, and the southern Korean Peninsula; partially migratory, withdrawing from Sakhalin Island and northern Japan in the nonbreeding season”.

Change the scientific name of subspecies obstinatus from Zosterops montanus obstinatus to Zosterops japonicus obstinatus.

Change the scientific name of subspecies montanus from Zosterops montanus montanus to Zosterops japonicus montanus.

Change the scientific name of subspecies difficilis from Zosterops montanus difficilis to Zosterops japonicus difficilis.

Change the scientific name of subspecies parkesi from Zosterops montanus parkesi to Zosterops japonicus parkesi.

Change the scientific name of subspecies whiteheadi from Zosterops montanus whiteheadi to Zosterops japonicus whiteheadi.

Change the scientific name of subspecies diuatae from Zosterops montanus diuatae to Zosterops japonicus diuatae.

Change the scientific name of subspecies vulcani from Zosterops montanus vulcani to Zosterops japonicus vulcani.

Change the scientific name of subspecies pectoralis from Zosterops montanus pectoralis to Zosterops japonicus pectoralis.

Change the scientific name of subspecies halconensis from Zosterops montanus halconensis to Zosterops japonicus halconensis.

Make the following changes to the subspecies of Swinhoe’s White-eye Zosterops simplex:

Change the scientific name of subspecies simplex from Zosterops japonicus simplex to Zosterops simplex simplex. Revise the range description from “W China to Myanmar, n Vietnam and Taiwan; winters to Hainan” to “breeds in eastern China (from extreme southern Gansu east to Jiangsu, south to eastern Yunnan, Guangxi, Guangdong and Fujian), Taiwan, and northeastern Vietnam; northern populations migratory, wintering from southeastern China to Thailand and central Indochina”.

Change the scientific name of subspecies hainanus from Zosterops japonicus hainanus to Zosterops simplex hainanus.

Subspecies williamsoni, previously classified as a subspecies of Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus, instead belongs to a group of white-eyes restricted to coastal habitats (Wells 2017a), which in turn are closely related to Swinhoe’s White-eye (Round et al. 2017; see also Lim et al. 2019). Repostion williamsoni to immedately follow Zosterops simplex hainanus, and change the scientific name from Zosterops palpebrosus williamsoni to Zosterops simplex williamsoni.

White-eyes occupying most of the range formerly attributed to subspecies auriventer (previously Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus auriventer, now Hume’s White-eye Zosterops auriventer auriventer), belong to a different taxon, for which the oldest available name is erwini Chasen 1935 (Wells 2017a). Subspecies erwini is a member of the simplex group (Round et al. 2017, Lim et al. 2019). Therefore insert erwini immediately following Zosterops simplex williamsoni. The range of erwini is “coastal forests of the western and southeastern Thai-Malay Peninsula, of Sumatra, the Riau Islands, Bangka, and the Natuna Islands; population of coastal western Borneo provisionally assigned here, but possibly a distinct taxon”.

Enggano White-eye Zosterops salvadorii is embedded within Swinhoe’s White-eye Zosterops simplex (Lim et al. 2019). Reposition salvadorii to immediately follow Zosterops simplex erwini, and change the scientific name from Zosterops salvadorii to Zosterops simplex salvadorii.

References:

Lim, B.T.M., K.R. Sadanandan, C. Dingle, Y.Y. Leung, D.M. Prawiradilaga, M. Irham, H. Ashari, J.G.H. Lee, and F.R. Rheindt. 2019. Molecular evidence suggests radical revision of species limits in the great speciator white-eye genus Zosterops. Journal of Ornithology 160: 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1583-7

Mees, G.F. 2006. The avifauna of Flores (Lesser Sunda Islands). Zoologische Mededelingen 80: 1-261.

Round, P.D., S. Manawattana, J. Khudamrongsawat, S. Thunhikorn, M. Safoowong, and T. Bhummakasikara. 2017. Disentangling avian diversity: South-East Asian mainland Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus constitutes two distinct lineages. Forktail 33: 103-115.

van Balen, S. 2008. Family Zosteropidae (white-eyes). Pages 402-485 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 13. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Wells, D.R. 2017a. Zosterops white-eyes in continental South-East Asia. 1: proposed refinements to the regional definition of Oriental White-eye Z. palpebrosus. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 137: 100-109.

 

page 497, Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler  Napothera danjoui

Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler Napothera danjoui is split into two species, following Renner et al. (2018). The monotypic group Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler (Naung Mung) Napothera danjoui naungmungensis now is recognized (again) as Naung Mung Scimitar-Babbler Napothera naungmungensis, which restores the status it had a species in Clements Checklist from version 6.0 (Clements 2007) through version 6.6 (2011). The polytypic group Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler (Short-tailed) Napothera danjoui danjoui/parvirostris now is recognized as Short-tailed Scimitar-Babbler Napothera danjoui, containing the subspecies danjoui and parvirostris.

Reference:

Renner, S.C., J.H. Rappole, M. Kyaw, C.M. Milensky, and M. Päckert. 2018. Genetic confirmation of the species status of Jabouilleia naungmungensis. Journal of Ornithology 159: 63-71. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-017-1493-0

 

page 505, Chinese Babax  Ianthocincla lanceolata

Chinese Babax Ianthocincla lanceolata is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005). We now recognize the polytypic group Chinese Babax (Chinese) Ianthocincla lanceolata lanceolata/latouchei as Chinese Babax Ianthocincla lanceolata, including the subspecies bonvaloti, lanceolata, and latouchei; and we now recognize the monotypic group Chinese Babax (Mt. Victoria) Ianthocincla lanceolata woodi as Mount Victoria Babax Ianthocincla woodi.

We recognize subspecies bonvaloti Oustalet 1892, following Vaurie (1959) and Traylor (1967); this subspecies previously was considered to be a junior synonym of nominate lanceolata (Deignan 1964). Insert bonvaloti immediately following the heading for the species, with range “southern China (southeastern Xizang to west central Sichuan and northwestern Yunnan)”.

With the recognition of subspecies bonvaloti, revise the range description of nominate lanceolata from “Mountains of se Tibet to se Assam, sw China and ne Myanmar” to “central and southern China (from southern Gansu, southern Shaanxi, and western Hubei south to central and northern Yunnan, central and eastern Sichuan and northern Guizhou) and northeastern and central Myanmar”.

References:

Deignan, H.G. 1964. Subfamily Timaliinae, Babblers. Pages 240-427 in E. Mayr and R.A. Paynter, Jr. (editors), Check-list of birds of the world. Volume X. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Traylor, M.A., Jr. 1967. A collection of birds from Szechwan. Fieldiana: Zoology 53: 1-67.

Vaurie, C. 1959. The birds of the Palearctic fauna. Passeriformes. H.F. & G. Witherby Limited, London.

 

page 445, Long-billed Gnatwren  Ramphocaenus melanurus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 790), the polytypic group Long-billed Gnatwren (Chattering) Ramphocaenus melanurus sticturus/obscurus is elevated to species rank, based on vocal and genetic differences (Harvey et al. 2014, Smith et al. 2018), and is recognized as Chattering Gnatwren Ramphocaenus sticturus, containing the subspecies sticturus and obscurus.

References:

Harvey, M.G., D.F. Lane, J. Hite, R.S. Terrill, S. Figueroa R., B.T. Smith, J. Klicka, and W. Vargas C. 2014. Notes on bird species in bamboo in northern Madre de Dios, Peru including the first Peruvian record of Acre Tody-Tyrant (Hemitriccus cohnhafti). Occasional Papers of the Louisiana State University Museum of Natural Science 81: 1-38.

Smith, B.T., R.W. Bryson, Jr., W.M. Mauck III, J. Chaves, M.B. Robbins, A. Aleixo, and J. Klicka. 2018. Species delimitation and biogeography of the gnatcatchers and gnatwrens (Aves: Polioptilidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 45-57.          https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.012

 

pages 445-446, White-lored Gnatcatcher  Polioptila albiloris

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), the monotypic group White-lored Gnatcatcher (Yucatan) Polioptila albiloris albiventris is elevated to species rank and is recognized as a separate species, Yucatan Gnatcatcher Polioptila albiventris, based on differences in vocalizations (Davis 1972) and genetic evidence that Yucatan Gnatcatcher is more closely related to Tropical Gnatcatcher Polioptila plumbea than it is to other subspecies of White-lored Gnatcatcher (Smith et al. 2018). As a result, the polytypic group White-lored Gnatcatcher (White-lored) Polioptila albiloris albiloris/vanrossemi no longer is necessary, and is deleted.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Davis, L.I. 1972. A field guide to the birds of Mexico and Central America. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas.

Smith, B.T., R.W. Bryson, Jr., W.M. Mauck III, J. Chaves, M.B. Robbins, A. Aleixo, and J. Klicka. 2018. Species delimitation and biogeography of the gnatcatchers and gnatwrens (Aves: Polioptilidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 45-57.          https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.012

 

page 446, Guianan Gnatcatcher  Polioptila guianensis

page 446, Slate-throated Gnatcatcher  Polioptila schistaceigula

page 446, Iquitos Gnatcatcher  Polioptila clementsi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 751), Guianan Gnatcatcher Polioptila guianensis is split into four monotypic species, following Whitney and Alvarez Alonso (2005), Whittaker et al. (2013), and Smith et al. (2018): Guianan Gnatcatcher Polioptila guianensis; Inambari Gnatcatcher Polioptila attenboroughi; Rio Negro Gnatcatcher Polioptila facilis; and Klage’s Gnatcatcher Polioptila paraensis.

Reposition Slate-throated Gnatcatcher Polioptila schistaceigula to follow Guianan Gnatcatcher Polioptila guianensis.

Reposition Iquitos Gnatcatcher Poloptila clementsi to follow Slate-throated Gnatcatcher Polioptila schistaceigula.

Position Inambari Gnatcatcher Polioptila attenboroughi, Rio Negro Gnatcatcher Polioptila facilis, and Klage’s Gnatcatcher Polioptila paraensis to follow Iquitos Gnatcatcher.

Revise the range description for Rio Negro Gnatcatcher from “S Venezuela (Amazonas) to extreme ne Brazil (upper Rio Negro)” to “eastern Colombia (Vaup√©s, Guain√≠a) and southern Venezuela (Amazonas) to extreme northern Brazil (northern Amazonas and west central Roraima)”.

References:

Smith, B.T., R.W. Bryson, Jr., W.M. Mauck III, J. Chaves, M.B. Robbins, A. Aleixo, and J. Klicka. 2018. Species delimitation and biogeography of the gnatcatchers and gnatwrens (Aves: Polioptilidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 45-57.          https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.012

Whitney, B.M., and J. Alvarez Alonso. 2005. A new species of gnatcatcher from white-sand forests of northern Amazonian Peru with revision of the Polioptila guianensis complex. Wilson Bulletin 117: 113-127. https://doi.org/10.1676/04-064

Whittaker, A., A. Aleixo, B.M. Whitney, B.T. Smith, and J. Klicka. 2013. A distinctive new species of gnatcatcher in the Polioptila guianensis complex (Aves: Polioptilidae) from western Amazonian Brazil. Pages 301-305 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, J. Sargatal, and D. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Special volume. New species and global index. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page (addition 2019), Raiatea Starling  Aplonis ulietensis

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2016), we recognize Raiatea Starling Aplonis ulietensis, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Raiatea (Society Islands); known from a specimen, now lost, collected in 1774”.¬† The affinities of this species are not clear; it originally was described as a thrush, but now is believed by some to have been a starling. Insert Raiatea Starling following Norfolk Starling Aplonis fusca.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 2. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 404, Scaly Thrush  Zoothera dauma

Scaly Thrush Zoothera dauma is split into two species, following Ishihara (1986) and Brazil (1991): a polytypic Scaly Thrush Zoothera dauma, containing subspecies dauma, horsfieldi, and iriomotensis; and a monotypic Amami Thrush Zoothera major.

We add a previously overlooked subspecies of Scaly Thrush, iriomotensis Nishiumi and Morioka 2009, with range “Iriomotejima (southern Ryukyu Islands)”. We also recognize this subspecies as a new monotypic group, Scaly Thrush (Iriomotejima) Zoothera dauma iriomotensis. Insert iriomotensis immediately following subspecies horsfieldi.

References:

Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Ishihara, T. 1986. [The Amami Ground Thrush distinct from the White’s Ground Thrush]. Strix 5: 60-61.

Nishiumi, I., and H. Morioka. 2009. A new subspecies of Zoothera dauma (Aves, Turdidae) from Iriomotejima, southern Ryukyus, with comments on Z. d. toratugumi. Bulletin of the National Museum of Nature and Science Series A 35: 113-124.

 

pages 411-412, Black-billed Thrush  Turdus ignobilis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 814), Black-billed Thrush Turdus ignobilis is split into three species, following Cerqueira et al. (2016), Avenda√Īo et al. (2017), and Stiles and Avenda√Īo (2019): the polytypic group Black-billed Thrush (Drab) Turdus ignobilis ignobilis/goodfellowi and the monotypic group Black-billed Thrush (Amazonian) Turdus ignobilis debilis remain in Black-billed Thrush Turdus ignobilis; the monotypic group Black-billed Thrush (Pantepui) Turdus ignobilis murinus now is recognized as Pantepui Thrush Turdus murinus; and the monotypic group Black-billed Thrush (Campina) Turdus ignobilis arthuri now is recognized as Campina Thrush Turdus arthuri. Pantepui Thrush is more closely related to Lawrence’s Thrush Turdus lawrencii than it is to Black-billed and Campina thrushes; reposition Pantepui Thrush to immediately follow Lawrence’s Thrush.

Revise the range description of Campina Thrush from “southern Venezuela and Guyana south locally to central Amazonian Brazil, from the east bank of the Rio Madeira to the east bank of the Rio Tapaj√≥s” to “eastern Colombia east to southern Venezuela and Guyana, south locally to central Amazonian Brazil, from the east bank of the Rio Madeira to the east bank of the Rio Tapaj√≥s”.

References:

Avenda√Īo, J.E., E. Arbel√°ez-Cort√©s, and C.D. Cadena. 2017. On the importance of geographic and taxonomic sampling in phylogeography: a reevaluation of diversification and species limits in a Neotropical thrush (Aves, Turdidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 111: 87‚Äď97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2017.03.020

Cerqueira, P.V., M.P.D. Santos, and A. Aleixo. 2016. Phylogeography, inter-specific limits and diversification of Turdus ignobilis (Aves: Turdidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 97: 177‚Äď186. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.01.005

Stiles, F.G., and J.E. Avenda√Īo. 2019. Distribution and status of Turdus thrushes in white-sand areas of eastern Colombia, with a new subspecies of T. leucomelas. Zootaxa 4567: 161-175.¬† http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4567.1.9

 

page 414, Fire-crested Alethe  Alethe castanea

Fire-crested Alethe Alethe diademata is split into two species, following Collar (2005). We now recognize the monotypic group Fire-crested Alethe (White-tailed) Alethe diademata diademata as White-tailed Alethe Alethe diademata; and we recognize the polytypic group Fire-crested Alethe (Fire-crested) Alethe diademata castanea/woosnami as Fire-crested Alethe Alethe castanea, containing the subspecies castanea and woosnami.

Reference:

Collar, N.J. 2005. Family Turdidae (thrushes). Pages 514-807 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 10. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 454, Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher¬† Cyornis tickelliae

Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae is split into two species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005; see also Gwee et al. 2019): the polytypic group Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae now is recognized as Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae, containing the subspecies tickelliae and jerdoni; and the polytypic group Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher (Indochinese) Cyornis tickelliae [sumatrensis Group] now is recognized as Indochineses Blue Flycatcher Cyornis sumatrensis, including the subspecies indochina, sumatrensis, and lamprus.

Reposition subspecies indochina to precede, rather than to follow, subspecies sumatrensis.

References:

Gwee, C.Y., J.A. Eaton, K.M. Garg, P. Alström, S. Van Balen, R.O. Hutchinson, D.M. Prawiradilaga, M.H. Le, and F.E. Rheindt. 2019. Cryptic diversity in Cyornis (Aves: Muscicapidae) jungle-flycatchers flagged by simple bioacoustic approaches. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 186: 725-741. https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz003

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 413, White-browed Shortwing  Brachypteryx montana

White-browed Shortwing Brachypteryx montana is split into four species, following Alström et al. (2018c). As a result, the monotypic group White-browed Shortwing (Himalayan) Brachypteryx montana cruralis now is recognized as Himalayan Shortwing Brachypteryx cruralis; the monotypic group White-browed Shortwing (Chinese) Brachypteryx montana sinensis now is recognized as Chinese Shortwing Brachypteryx sinensis; the monotypic group White-browed Shortwing (Taiwan) Brachypteryx montana goodfellowi now is recognized as Taiwan Shortwing Brachypteryx goodfellowi; and White-browed Shortwing Brachypteryx montana contains subspecies poliogyna, andersoni, mindorensis, brunneiceps, mindanensis, malindangensis, sillimani, erythrogyna, saturata, montana, and floris.

Revise the range description for Chinese Shortwing from “Mountains of se China (nw Fujian and Guangxi)” to “southeastern China (southern Shaanxi south to Guizhou and Guangxi, east to Jiangxi and northwestern Fujian)”.

Reference:

Alström, P., P.C. Rasmussen, C. Xia, M. Gelang, Y. Liu, G. Chen, M. Zhao, Y. Hao, C. Zhao, J. Zhao, C. Yao, J.A. Eaton, R. Hutchinson, F. Lei and U. Olsson. 2018c. Taxonomy of the White-browed Shortwing (Brachypteryx montana) complex on mainland Asia and Taiwan: an integrative approach supports recognition of three instead of one species. Avian Research 9: 34.

 

page 464, Red-tailed Wheatear  Oenanthe xanthoprymna

Each of the two monotypic groups of Red-tailed Wheatear Oenanthe xanthoprymna is recognized as a species, following Rasmussen and Anderton (2005) and Shirihai and Svensson (2018): the group Red-tailed Wheatear (Kurdistan) Oenanthe xanthoprymna xanthoprymna becomes Kurdish Wheatear Oenanthe xanthoprymna, and the group Red-tailed Wheatear (Red-tailed) Oenanthe xanthoprymna chrysopygia becomes Persian Wheatear Oenanthe chrysopygia.

Revise the range description for Kurdish Wheatear from “Mts. of se Turkey to sw Iran; > Sinai, e Egypt and Sudan” to “breeds in southeastern Turkey, extreme northeastern Iraq, and western Iran; winters in eastern Egypt (in the Nile Valley and near the Red Sea), northeastern Sudan, and on the western Arabian Peninsula, locally also in southern Israel”.

Revise the range description for Persian Wheatear from “Transcaucasia to Afghanistan; > to Pakistan and nw India” to “breeds from northeastern Turkey, southern Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran east to southern Turkmenistan, southern Tajikistan (Pamir range), Afghanistan, and extreme northwestern Pakistan; winters from the southern Arabian Peninsula and southern Iraq east to Pakistan and northwestern India”.

References:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Shirihai, H., and L. Svensson. 2018. Handbook of Western Palaearctic birds. Volume 1. Helm, London.

 

pages 534-535, Plain-throated Sunbird  Anthreptes malacensis

Plain-throated Sunbird Anthreptes malacensis is split into two species, following Cheke and Mann (2008). The polytypic group Plain-throated Sunbird (Brown-throated) [malacensis Group] now is recognized as Brown-throated Sunbird Anthreptes malacensis, containing the subspecies malacensis, mjobergi, borneensis, chlorigaster, heliolusius, cagayanensis, paraguae, wiglesworthi, iris, heliocalus, celebensis, extremus, convergens, rubrigena, and anambae; and the polytypic group Plain-throated Sunbird (Gray-throated) Anthreptes malacensis griseigularis/birgitae now is recognized as Gray-throated Sunbird Anthreptes griseigularis, containing the subspecies griseigularis and birgitae.

Reference:

Cheke, R.A., and C.F. Mann. 2008. Family Nectarinidae (sunbirds). Pages 196-320 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 13. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 538, Miombo Sunbird  Cinnyris manoensis

Miombo Sunbird Cinnyris manoensis is split into two species, following Irwin et al. (2014). The monotypic group Miombo Sunbird (Western) Cinnyris manoensis pintoi now is recognized as Western Miombo Sunbird Cinnyris gertrudis (note that the name pintoi is replaced by the older available name gertrudis); and the polytypic group Miombo Sunbird (Eastern) Cinnyris manoensis manoensis/amicorum now is recognized as Eastern Miombo Sunbird Cinnyris manoensis, containing the subspecies manoensis and amicorum.

Reference:

Irwin, M.P.S., P.M. Leonard, and J.F.R. Colebrook-Robjent. 2014. There are two distinct, not immediately related species of Miombo Double-collared Sunbirds: Cinnyris manoensis and C. gertrudis. Honeyguide 60: 54-61.

 

page 539, Eastern Double-collared Sunbird  Cinnyris mediocris

Eastern Double-collared Sunbird Cinnyris mediocris is split into three species, following Bowie et al. (2004b). The monotypic group Eastern Double-collared Sunbird (Eastern) Cinnyris mediocris mediocris now is recognized as Eastern Double-collared Sunbird Cinnyris mediocris; the monotypic group Eastern Double-collared Sunbird (Usambara) Cinnyris mediocris usambaricus now is recognized as Usambara Double-collared Sunbird Cinnyris usambaricus; and the polytypic group Eastern Double-collared Sunbird (Forest) Cinnyris mediocris fuelleborni/bensoni now is recognized as Forest Double-collared Sunbird Cinnyris fuelleborni, containing subspecies fuelleborni and bensoni.

Reference:

Bowie, R.C.K., J. Fjelds√•, S.J. Hackett, and T.M. Crowe. 2004b. Systematics and biogeography of Double-collared Sunbirds from the Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania. Auk 121: 660‚Äď681. https://doi.org/10.2307/4090305

 

page 609, Red-headed Fody  Foudia eminentissima

The monotypic group Red-headed Fody (Aldabra) Foudia eminentissima aldabrana is not closely related to other subspecies of Red-headed Fody (Warren et al. 2012, Safford and Hawkins 2013), and is recognized as a separate species, Aldabra Fody Foudia aldabrana.

The polytypic Red-headed Fody (Comoros) Foudia eminentissima [eminentissima Group] is partitioned into two groups: a monotypic group Red-headed Fody (Grand Comoro) Foudia eminentissima consobrina; and a polytypic group Red-headed Fody (Southern Comoros) Foudia eminentissima [eminentissima Group], containing the subspecies anjuanensis, eminentissima, and algondae.

References:

Safford, R., and F. Hawkins (editors). 2013. The birds of Africa. Volume VIII. The Malagasy region. Christopher Helm, London.

Warren, B.H., E. Bermingham, Y. Bourgeois, L.K. Estep, R.P. Prys-Jones, D. Strasberg, and C. Thébaud. 2012. Hybridization and barriers to gene flow in an island bird radiation. Evolution 66: 1490-1505. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01550.x

 

page (addition 2019), Reunion Fody  Foudia delloni

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2016), we recognize Reunion Fody Foudia delloni, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on R√©union Island; probably went extinct some time before 1700”. Insert Reunion Fody following Forest Fody Foudia omissa.

Reference:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 2. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 612, Swee Waxbill  Coccopygia melanotis

Swee Waxbill Coccopygia melanotis is split into two species, following Hockey et al. (2005) and Payne (2010b). The monotypic group Swee Waxbill (Angola) Coccopygia melanotis bocagei now is recognized as Angola Waxbill Coccopygia bocagei; and the monotypic group Swee Waxbill (Swee) Coccopygia melanotis melanotis now is recognized as Swee Waxbill Coccopygia melanotis.

References:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Payne, R.B. 2010b. Family Estrildidae (waxbills). Pages 234-377 in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D.A. Christie (editors), Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 15. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 603, Desert Sparrow  Passer simplex

Desert Sparrow Passer simplex is split into two species, following Kirwan et al. (2009) and Sangster et al. (2013). The polytypic group Desert Sparrow (Desert) Passer simplex simplex/saharae now is recognized as Desert Sparrow Passer simplex, containing the subspecies saharae and simplex; and the monotypic group Desert Sparrow (Zarudny’s) Passer simplex zarudnyi now is recognized as Zarudny’s Sparrow Passer zarudnyi.

References:

Kirwan, G.M., M. Schweizer, R. Ayé, and A. Grieve. 2009. Taxonomy, identification and status of Desert Sparrows. Dutch Birding 31: 139-158.

Sangster. G., J.M. Collinson, P.-A. Crochet, A.G. Knox, D.T. Parkin, and S.C. Votier. 2013. Taxonomic recommendations for Western Palearctic birds: ninth report. Ibis 155: 898-907.

 

page 626, Blue Chaffinch  Fringilla teydea

Blue Chaffinch Fringilla teydea is split into two species, following Sangster et al. (2016b) and Lifjeld et al. (2016): the monotypic group Blue Chaffinch (Tenerife) Fringilla teydea teydea now is recognized as Tenerife Blue Chaffinch Fringilla teydea, and the monotypic group Blue Chaffinch (Gran Canaria) Fringilla teydea polatzeki now is recognized as Gran Canaria Blue Chaffinch Fringilla polatzeki.

References:

Lifjeld, J.T., J.A. Anmarkrud, P. Calabuig, J.E.J. Cooper, L.E. Johannessen, A. Johnsen, A.M. Kearns, R.F. Lachlan, T. Laskemoen, G. Marthinsen, E. Stensrud, and E. Garcia-del-Rey. 2016. Species-level divergences in multiple functional traits between the two endemic subspecies of Blue Chaffinches Fringilla teydea in Canary Islands. BMC Zoology 1: 4.

Sangster, G., J.M. Collinson, P.-A. Crochet, G.M. Kirwan, A.G. Knox, D.T. Parkin, and S.C. Votier. 2016b. Taxonomic recommendations for Western Palaearctic birds: 11th report. Ibis 158: 206-212.

 

page 628, Golden-winged Grosbeak  Rhynchostruthus socotranus

Golden-winged Grosbeak Rhynchostruthus socotranus is split into two species, following Kirwan and Grieve (2007). The monotypic group Golden-winged Grosbeak (Arabian) Rhynchostruthus socotranus percivali now is recognized as Arabian Grosbeak Rhynchostruthus percivali; and the monotypic group Golden-winged Grosbeak (Socotra) Rhynchostruthus socotranus socotranus now is recognized as Socotra Grosbeak Rhynchostruthus socotranus.

Reference:

Kirwan, G.M., and A. Grieve. 2007. Studies of Socotran birds II. One, two or three species: towards a rational taxonomy for the Golden-winged Grosbeak Rhynchostruthus socotranus. Bulletin of the African Bird Club 14: 159-169.

 

page 636, Streaky-headed Seedeater  Crithagra gularis

Streaky-headed Seedeater Crithagra gularis is split into two species, following Wolters (1979) and Prigogine (1985). The polytypic group Streaky-headed Seedeater (West African) Crithagra gularis [canicapilla Group] now is recognized as West African Seedeater Crithagra canicapilla, containing the subspecies canicapilla, montanorum, and elgonensis; and the polytypic group Streaky-headed Seedeater (Streaky-headed) Crithagra gularis [gularis Group] now is recognized as Streaky-headed Seedeater Crithagra gularis, containing the subspecies benguellensis, mendosa, gularis, endemion, and humilis.

References:

Prigogine, A. 1985. Recently recognized bird species in the Afrotropical region – a critical review. Pages 91-114 in K.-L. Schuchmann (editor), Proceedings of the International Symposium on African vertebrates: systematics, phylogeny and evolutionary ecology. Zoologisches Forschungsinstitut und Museum Alexander Koenig, Bonn.

Wolters, H.E. 1979. Die Vogelarten der Erde. 4. Paul Parey, Hamburg.

 

page (addition 2019), Bermuda Towhee  Pipilo naufragus

Following del Hoyo and Collar (2016), we recognize Bermuda Towhee Pipilo naufragus, with range “Extinct. Formerly occurred on Bermuda; apparently survived until at least 1611” (Olson and Wingate 2012). Insert Bermuda Towhee following Eastern Towhee Pipilo erythrophthalmus.

References:

del Hoyo, J., and N.J. Collar. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International illustrated checklist of the birds of the world. Volume 2. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Olson, S.L., and D.B. Wingate. 2012. A new species of towhee (Aves: Emberizidae: Pipilo) from Quaternary deposits on Bermuda. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 125: 85-96. https://doi.org/10.2988/11-21.1

 

 

SPECIES LOSSES (lumps and other deletions)

 

page 6, Chaco Nothura  Nothura chacoensi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 782), Chaco Nothura Nothura chacoensis is lumped with Spotted Nothura Nothura maculosa, following Hayes et al. (2018). As chacoensis is not field identifiable, other than by range, we do not recognize it as a group. Insert chacoensis following subspecies major.

Reference:

Hayes, F.E., O. Rodr√≠guez, E.R. Thalman, E.A. Castellanos, and J. Sterling. 2018. Taxonomic status of Paraguay’s only endemic bird, the Chaco Nothura Nothura chacoensis (Aves: Tinamidae). Zootaxa 4392: 347-360. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4392.2.7

 

page 129, Norfolk Island Pigeon  Hemiphaga spadicea

The extinct Norfolk Island Pigeon Hemiphaga spadicea is lumped with New Zealand Pigeon Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae (Goldberg et al. 2011), and now is recognized as New Zealand Pigeon (Norfolk) Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae spadicea. Position spadicea immediately following the species heading for New Zealand Pigeon.

With the lump of Norfolk Island Pigeon Hemiphaga spadicea into New Zealand Pigeon Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae, the latter no longer is monophyletic; hence we add an entry for nominate novaeseelandiae, immediately following spadicea. We also recognize nominate novaeseelandiae as a new monotypic group, New Zealand Pigeon (New Zealand) Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae.

Reference:

Goldberg, J., S.A. Trewick, and R.G. Powlesland. 2011. Population structure and biogeography of Hemiphaga pigeons (Aves: Columbidae) on islands in the New Zealand region. Journal of Biogeography 38: 285‚Äď298. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2010.02414.x

 

page 206, Royal Sunangel  Heliangelus regalis

Bogota Sunangel Heliangelus zusii, with range “Formerly Colombian Andes. Extinct; last reported 1909”, is known only from a single specimen, which now is believed to represent a hybrid between Long-tailed Sylph Aglaiocercus kingii and an as yet unidentified second species of hummingbird (P√©rez-Em√°n et al. 2018). Therefore Bogota Sunangel is not a valid species, and is deleted; note, however, that Bogota Sunangel still is recognized by AOS-SACC.

Reference:

Pérez-Emán, J.L., J. Perdigón Ferreira, N. Gutiérrez-Pinto, A.M. Cuervo, L.N. Céspedes, C.C. Witt, and C.D. Cadena. 2018. An extinct hummingbird species that never was: a cautionary tale about sampling issues in molecular phylogenetics. Zootaxa 4442: 491-497. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4442.3.11

 

page addition (2009), Forbes’s Snipe¬† Coenocorypha chathamica

Forbes’s Snipe Coenocorypha chathamica, with range “formerly Chatham Islands; extinct”, is deleted. This species is known only from fossil remains (Gill et al. 2010), with no confirmation that it survived until 1500, and it does not meet the criteria for inclusion in the checklist.

Reference:

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

 

page 102, Red-billed Gull  Chroicocephalus scopulinus

Red-billed Gull Chroicocephalus scopulinus is lumped with Silver Gull Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae, following Gill et al. (2010). We now recognize two groups in Silver Gull, a polytypic Silver Gull (Siver) Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae novaehollandiae/forsteri, and a monotypic Silver Gull (Red-billed) Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae scopulinus.

Reference:

Gill, B.J., B.D. Bell, C.K. Chambers, D.G. Medway, R.L. Palma, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, and T.H. Worthy (Checklist Committee, Ornithological Society of New Zealand). 2010. Checklist of the birds of New Zealand. Te Papa Press and the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.

 

page 48, Changeable Hawk-Eagle  Nisaetus limnaeetus

Changeable Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus limnaeetus is lumped with Crested Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus cirrhatus (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001; see also Gamauf et al. 2005); the combined species is known as Changeable Hawk-Eagle Nisaetus cirrhatus. We retain each of the two former species as polytypic groups: Changeable Hawk-Eagle (Crested) Nisaetus cirrhatus cirrhatus/ceylanensis; and Changeable Hawk-Eagle (Changeable) Nisaetus cirrhatus [limnaetus Group].

References:

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

Gamauf, A., J.O. Gjershaug, N. R√łv, K. Kval√ły, and E. Haring. 2005. Species or subspecies? The dilemma of taxonomic ranking of some South‚ÄźEast Asian hawk‚Äźeagles (genus Spizaetus). Bird Conservation International 15: 99‚Äź117. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0959270905000080

 

page 213, Orange-bellied Trogon  Trogon aurantiiventris

page 213, Collared Trogon  Trogon collaris

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), Orange-bellied Trogon Trogon aurantiiventris is lumped with Collared Trogon Trogon collaris, based on vocal similarities (Stiles and Skutch 1989) and genetic evidence that Orange-bellied Trogon is embedded within Collared Trogon (DaCosta and Klicka 2008).

Subspecies extimus, previously included in the polytypic group Collared Trogon (Bar-tailed) Trogon collaris puella/extimus, properly belongs with the group Collared Trogon (Collared) Trogon collaris [collaris Group]. Consequently the group Collared Trogon (Bar-tailed) becomes monotypic; change the scientific name to Trogon collaris puella, and change the English name to Collared Trogon (Xalapa). Reposition extimus to immediately follow the heading for Collared Trogon (Collared) Trogon collaris [collaris Group].

Subspecies flavidior, with range “W Panama (extreme e Chiriqu√≠ on Cerro Flores)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of aurantiirostris (Wetmore 1968), and is deleted. Revise the range description of aurantiirostris from “Humid montane forests of central Costa Rica to w Panama” to “highlands of central and southern Costa Rica to western Panama”.

With the deletion of subspecies flavidior, change the scientific name for the group Collared Trogon (Orange-bellied) from Trogon collaris [aurantiiventris Group] to Trogon collaris aurantiiventris/underwoodi.

Reposition subspecies exoptatus to immediately follow subspecies subtropicalis.

Revise the range description for nominate collaris from “E Colombia to Bolivia, Venezuela and the Guianas” to “eastern South America north of the Andes, from Colombia east to the Guianas”.

Subspecies eytoni, with range “E Brazil”, is considered to be a junior synonym of subspecies castaneus (Zimmer 1948), and is deleted. Revise the range description for castaneus from “Tropical e Colombia to nw Brazil, e Peru and n Bolivia” to “central South America south of the Amazon, from Peru and Bolivia east to Par√°; and eastern Brazil from Bahia to Rio de Janeiro”.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

DaCosta, J.M., and J. Klicka. 2008. The Great American Interchange in birds: a phylogenetic perspective with the genus Trogon. Molecular Ecology 17: 1328-1343. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03647.x

Stiles, F.G., and A.F. Skutch. 1989. A guide to the birds of Costa Rica. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.

Wetmore, A. 1968. The birds of the Republic of Panama. Part 2. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections volume 150, part 2.

Zimmer, J.T. 1948. Studies of Peruvian birds. No. 53. The family Trogonidae. American Museum Novitates number 1380.

 

page 238, Gold-faced Barbet  Psilopogon chrysopsis

Gold-faced Barbet Psilopogon chrysopsis is lumped with Gold-whiskered Barbet Psilopogon chrysopogon, following Eaton et al. (2016); the combined species is known as Gold-whiskered Barbet Psilopogon chrysopogon. We retain each of the two former species as groups: a polytypic Gold-whiskered Barbet (Gold-whiskered) Psilopogon chrysopogon chrysopogon/laetus, containing the subspecies laetus and chrysopogon; and a monotypic Gold-whiskered Barbet (Gold-faced) Psilopogon chrysopogon chrysopsis.

Reference:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

 

page 295, Fulvous-throated Antwren  Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota

page 295, Rufous-backed Antwren  Epinecrophylla haematonota

page 295, Brown-backed Antwren  Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla haematonota from Rufous-backed Antwren to Rufous-backed Stipplethroat; change the English name of Fulvous-throated Antwren Epinecrophylla pyrrhonota to Rio Negro Stipplethroat; and change the English name of Brown-backed Antwren Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai to Yasuni Stipplethroat. Also in accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 817), Rio Negro Stipplethroat and Yasuni Stipplethroat both are lumped with Rufous-backed Stipplethroat, following Isler and Whitney (2018). Each taxon, however, continues to be recognized as a monotypic group: Rufous-backed Stipplethroat (Rio Negro) Epinecrophylla haematonota pyrrhonota; Rufous-backed Stipplethroat (Yasuni) Epinecrophylla haematonota fjeldsaai; and Rufous-backed Stipplethroat (Rufous-backed) Epinecrophylla haematonota haematonota.

Reference:

Isler, M.L. and B.M. Whitney. 2018. Reevaluation of the taxonomic positions of members of the Epinecrophylla haemantonota (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) antwren complex including E. fjeldsaai based on vocalizations. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 130: 908-914. https://doi.org/10.1676/1559-4491.130.4.908

 

page 353, Erlanger’s Lark¬† Calandrella erlangeri

Erlanger’s Lark Calandrella erlangeri is lumped with Blanford’s Lark Calandrella blanfordi, following Stervander et al. (2016); it continues to be recognized as a monotypic group, Blandford’s Lark (Erlanger’s) Calandrella blandordi erlangeri.

Reference:

Stervander, M., P. Alstr√∂m, U. Olsson, U. Ottosson, B. Hansson, and Staffan Bensch. 2016. Multiple instances of paraphyletic species and cryptic taxa revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear RAD data for Calandrella larks (Aves: Alaudidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 102: 233‚Äď245. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2016.05.032

 

page 443, Desert Whitethroat  Sylvia minula

page 443, Hume’s Whitethroat¬† Sylvia althaea

page 443, Margelanic Whitethroat  Sylvia margelanica

Desert Whitethroat Sylvia minula, Hume’s Whitethroat Sylvia althaea, and Margelanic Whitethroat Sylvia margelanica all are lumped back into Lesser Whitethroat Sylvia curruca, following Shirihai and Svensson (2018). Each is retained, however, as a separate monotypic group: Lesser Whitethroat (Desert) Sylvia curruca minula; Lesser Whitethroat (Hume’s) Sylvia curruca althaea; and Lesser Whitethroat (Gansu) Sylvia curruca margelanica.

Reference:

Shirihai, H., and L. Svensson. 2018. Handbook of Western Palaearctic birds. Volume 1. Helm, London.

 

page 552, Mountain White-eye  Zosterops montanus

Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus contains two unrelated genetic groups (Round et al. 2017, Lim et al. 2019), and so is split into two species, Warbling White-eye Zosterops japonicus and Swinhoe’s White-eye Zosterops simplex. Furthermore, the polytypic Mountain White-eye Zosterops montanus is embedded within one of these species, Warbling White-eye (Lim et al. 2019). Warbling White-eye now includes subspecies japonicus, stejnegeri, insularis, loochooensis, alani, and daitoensis of Japanese White-eye, and subspecies obstinatus, montanus, difficilis, parkesi, whiteheadi, diuatae, vulcani, pectoralis, and halconensis of Mountain White-eye. (Subspecies gilli, previously classified as a subspecies of Mountain White-eye, now is considered to be a junior synonym of nominate meyeni Lowland White-eye, following Mees 2006, and is deleted.)

References:

Lim, B.T.M., K.R. Sadanandan, C. Dingle, Y.Y. Leung, D.M. Prawiradilaga, M. Irham, H. Ashari, J.G.H. Lee, and F.R. Rheindt. 2019. Molecular evidence suggests radical revision of species limits in the great speciator white-eye genus Zosterops. Journal of Ornithology 160: 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1583-7

Mees, G.F. 2006. The avifauna of Flores (Lesser Sunda Islands). Zoologische Mededelingen 80: 1-261.

Round, P.D., S. Manawattana, J. Khudamrongsawat, S. Thunhikorn, M. Safoowong, and T. Bhummakasikara. 2017. Disentangling avian diversity: South-East Asian mainland Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus constitutes two distinct lineages. Forktail 33: 103-115.

 

page 551, Enggano White-eye  Zosterops salvadorii

Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus contains two unrelated genetic groups (Round et al. 2017, Lim et al. 2019), and so is split into two species, Warbling White-eye Zosterops japonicus and Swinhoe’s White-eye Zosterops simplex. Furthermore, the monotypic Enggano White-eye Zosterops salvadorii is embedded within one of these species, Swinhoe’s White-eye (Lim et al. 2019). Reposition salvadorii to immediately follow Zosterops simplex erwini, and change the scientific name from Zosterops salvadorii to Zosterops simplex salvadorii.

References:

Lim, B.T.M., K.R. Sadanandan, C. Dingle, Y.Y. Leung, D.M. Prawiradilaga, M. Irham, H. Ashari, J.G.H. Lee, and F.R. Rheindt. 2019. Molecular evidence suggests radical revision of species limits in the great speciator white-eye genus Zosterops. Journal of Ornithology 160: 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1583-7

Round, P.D., S. Manawattana, J. Khudamrongsawat, S. Thunhikorn, M. Safoowong, and T. Bhummakasikara. 2017. Disentangling avian diversity: South-East Asian mainland Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosus constitutes two distinct lineages. Forktail 33: 103-115.

 

page 554, Lord Howe White-eye  Zosterops tephropleurus

Lord Howe White-eye Zosterops tephropleurus is lumped with Silvereye Zosterops lateralis (Schodde and Mason 1999). Positions tephropleurus following subspecies flaviceps. Revise the range description from “Lord Howe I. (off New Zealand)” to “Lord Howe Island”.

Reference:

Schodde, R., and I.J. Mason. 1999. The directory of Australian birds. Passerines. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra.

 

page 403, Kivu Ground-Thrush  Geokichla tanganjicae

Kivu Ground-Thrush Geokichla tanganjicae is lumped with Abyssinian Ground-Thrush Geokichla piaggiae (Urban et al. 1997). Each former species now is recognized as a separate group: a polytypic group Abyssinian Ground-Thrush (Abyssinian) Geokichla piaggiae [piaggiae Group], containing the subspecies piaggiae, hadii, ruwenzorii, kilimensis, and rowei; and a monotypic group Abyssinian Ground-Thrush (Kivu) Geokichla piaggiae tanganjicae.

Reference:

Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry, and S. Keith. 1997. The birds of Africa. Volume V. Academic Press, London.

 

page 459, African Scrub-Robin  Cercotrichas minor

African Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas minor is lumped with Rufous-tailed Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas galactotes (Keith et al. 1992). Each former species now is recognized as a separate polytypic group: Rufous-tailed Scrub-Robin (Rufous-tailed) Cercotrichas galactotes [galactotes Group], containing the subspecies galactotes, syriaca, and familiaris; and Rufous-tailed Scrub-Robin (African) Cercotrichas galactotes minor/hamertoni, containing the subspecies minor and hamertoni.

Reference:

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 615, Black-faced Quailfinch  Ortygospiza atricollis

page 615, Black-chinned Quailfinch  Ortygospiza gabonensis

page 616, African Quailfinch  Ortygospiza fuscocrissa

Black-faced Quailfinch Ortygospiza atricollis, Black-chinned Quailfinch Ortygospiza gabonensis, and African Quailfinch Ortygospiza fuscocrissa are lumped into a single species, Quailfinch Ortygospiza atricollis, following Payne and Sorenson (2007). Each of the former species is retained as a polytypic group: Quailfinch (Black-faced) Ortygospiza atricollis [atricollis Group], containing the subspecies atricollis, ansorgei, and ugandae; Quailfinch (Black-chinned) Ortygospiza atricollis [gabonensis Group], containing the subspecies gabonensis, fuscata, and dorsostriata; and Quailfinch (Spectacled) Ortygospiza atricollis [fuscocrissa Group], containing the subspecies fuscocrissa, muelleri, smithersi, pallida, and digressa. Note the change of the English name of the fuscocrissa group, from African to Spectacled.

Reposition subspecies ansorgei to precede (rather than to follow) subspecies ugandae.

Reference:

Payne, R.B., and M.D. Sorenson. 2007. Integrative systematics at the species level: plumage, songs and molecular phylogeny of quailfinches Ortygospiza. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 127: 4-26.

 

page 363, Jackson’s Pipit¬† Anthus latistriatus

Jackson’s Pipit Anthus latistriatus is lumped with African Pipit Anthus cinnamomeus (Keith et al. 1992). This taxon continues to be recognized as a monotypic group, African Pipit (Jackson’s) Anthus cinnamomeus latistriatus. Position this group following subspecies rufuloides.

Reference:

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 636, Damara Canary  Serinus leucolaemus

Damara Canary Serinus leucolaemus is lumped with Black-headed Canary Serinus alario (Hockey et al. 2005). We now recognize two new monotypic groups, Black-headed Canary (Damara) Serinus alario leucolaemus, and Black-headed Canary (Black-headed) Serinus alario alario.

Reference:

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

 

ORDERS AND FAMILIES

FAMILIES (lumps)

pages 581-582,  Bellmagpies and Allies  Cracticidae

The family Cracticidae (Bellmagpies and Allies) is merged into Artamidae (Norman et al. 2009, J√łnsson et al. 2011a, Aggerbeck et al. 2014, Oliveros et al. 2019). Change the English name of Artamidae from Woodswallows to Woodswallows, Bellmagpies, and Allies.

References:

Aggerbeck, M., J. Fjelds√•, L. Christidis, P.-H. Fabre, and K.A. J√łnsson. 2014. Resolving deep lineage divergences in core corvoid passerine birds supports a proto-Papuan island origin. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 70: 272-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2013.09.027

J√łnsson, K.A., P.-H. Fabre, R.E. Ricklefs, and J. Fjelds√•. 2011a. Major global radiation of corvoid birds originated in the proto-Papuan archipelago. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 108: 2328‚Äď2333. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1018956108

Norman, J.A., P.G.P. Ericson, K.A. J√łnsson, J. Fjelds√•, and L. Christidis. 2009. A multi-gene phylogeny reveals novel relationships for aberrant genera of Australo-Papuan core Corvoidea and polyphyly of the Pachycephalidae and Psophodidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 52: 488-497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.03.019

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

 

pages 419, 443, 503, 507-508, 510-513, Paradoxornithidae  Parrotbills, Wrentit, and Allies

Paradoxornithidae (Parrotbills, Wrentit, and Allies) is merged into Sylviidae (e.g., Fregin et al 2012, Moyle et al. 2012, Alström et al. 2013b, Olsson et al. 2013a, Oliveros et al. 2019). Change the English name for Sylviidae from Sylviid Warblers to Sylviid Warblers, Parrotbills, and Allies.

References:

Alstr√∂m, P., U. Olsson, and F. Lei. 2013b. A review of the recent advances in the systematics of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Chinese Birds 4: 99‚Äď131. https://doi.org/10.5122/cbirds.2013.0016

Fregin, S., M. Haase, U. Olsson, and P. Alström. 2012. New insights into family relationships within the avian superfamily Sylvioidea (Passeriformes) based on seven molecular markers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 12: 157.

Moyle, R.G., M.J. Andersen, C.H. Oliveros, F.D. Steinheimer, and S. Reddy. 2012. Phylogeny and biolgeography of the core Babblers (Aves: Timaliidae). Systematic Biology 61: 631-651. https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/sys027

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Olsson, U., M. Irestedt, G. Sangster, P.G.P. Ericson, and P. Alström. 2013a. Systematic revision of the avian family Cisticolidae based on a multi-locus phylogeny of all genera. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 790-799. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.11.004

FAMILIES (composition)

page 78, Gray-throated Rail  Canirallus oculeus

Genetic evidence indicates that Gray-throated Rail Canirallus oculeus is misplaced in Sarothruridae (Flufftails), but instead belongs in Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, and Coots) (Boast et al. 2019). Reposition Gray-throated Rail to follow Roviana Rail Gallirallus rovianae.

Reference:

Boast, A.P., B. Chapman, M.B. Herrera, T.H. Worthy, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, P. Houde, M. Bunce, A. Cooper, and K.J. Mitchell. 2019. Mitochondrial genomes from New Zealand’s extinct adzebills (Aves: Aptornithidae: Aptornis) support a sister-taxon relationship with the Afro-Madagascan Sarothruridae. Diversity 11: 24.  https://doi.org/10.3390/d11020024

 

page 331, Royal Flycatcher  Onychorhynchus coronatus

page 333, Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher  Terenotriccus erythrurus

page 333, Tawny-breasted Flycatcher  Myiobius villosus

page 332, Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher  Myiobius sulphureipygius

page 332, Black-tailed Flycatcher  Myiobius atricaudus

Royal Flycatcher Onychorhynchus coronatus, Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher Terenotriccus erythrurus, and the three species of Myiobius flycatchers are closely related to each other (Ohlson et al. 2008, Rheindt et al. 2008b, Tello et al. 2009), but are not members of Tyrannidae (Tyrant Flycatchers); rather, these species are more closely related to Sharpbill Oxyrunchus cristatus (Tello et al. 2009, Ohlson et al. 2012, Oliveros et al. 2019). Therefore we transfer these species to Oxyruncidae. Change the English name for Oxyruncidae from Sharpbill to Sharpbill, Royal Flycatcher, and Allies.

Reposition Royal Flycatcher to a position immediately following Sharpbill.

Reposition Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher to a position immediately following Sharpbill and Royal

Flycatcher.

Reposition the three species of Myiobius to a position immediately following Sharpbill, Royal Flycatcher, and Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher.

References:

Ohlson, J.I., J. Fjelds√•, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2008. Tyrant flycatchers coming out in the open: phylogeny and ecological radiation of Tyrannidae (Aves, Passeriformes). Zoologica Scripta 37: 315‚Äď335. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00325.x

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, J. Fjeldså, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. Nuclear DNA from a 180-year old study skin reveals the phylogenetic position of the Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata (Passeriformes: Tyrannides). Ibis 154: 533-541. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-919X.2012.01243.x

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Rheindt, F.E., J.A. Norman, and L. Christidis. 2008b. Phylogenetic relationships of tyrant-flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae), with an emphasis on the elaeniine assemblage. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 46: 88‚Äď101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2007.09.011

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009. Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-0031.2009.00254.x

 

page 318, Wing-barred Piprites  Piprites chloris

page 318, Gray-headed Piprites  Piprites griseiceps

page 318, Black-capped Piprites  Piprites pileata

The three species of piprites Piprites are not members of Pipridae (Manakins), but instead are more closely related to Tyrannidae (Tyrant Flycatchers) (Ohlson et al. 2008, 2012, 2013, Tello et al. 2009, Oliveros et al. 2019). Reposition Piprites at the beginning of Tyrannidae, immediately following Black-tailed Flycatcher Myiobius atricaudus.

References:

Ohlson, J.I., J. Fjelds√•, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2008. Tyrant flycatchers coming out in the open: phylogeny and ecological radiation of Tyrannidae (Aves, Passeriformes). Zoologica Scripta 37: 315‚Äď335. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00325.x

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, J. Fjeldså, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. Nuclear DNA from a 180-year old study skin reveals the phylogenetic position of the Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata (Passeriformes: Tyrannides). Ibis 154: 533-541. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-919X.2012.01243.x

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, P.G.P. Ericson, and J. Fjeldså. 2013b. Phylogeny and classification of the New World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes). Zootaxa 3613: 1-35. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3613.1.1

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009. Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-0031.2009.00254.x

 

page 508, Ludlow’s Fulvetta¬† Alcippe ludlowi

Ludlow’s Fulvetta is a true fulvetta (genus Fulvetta), not a member of Alcippeidae (Price et al. 2014, Cai et al. 2019). Change the scientific name from Alcippe ludlowi to Fulvetta ludlowi; transfer Ludlow’s Fulvetta to Sylviidae (Sylviid Warblers, Parrotbills, and Allies); and position it following Chinese Fulvetta Fulvetta striaticollis.

References:

Cai, T., A. Cibois, P. Alstr√∂m, R.G. Moyle, J.D. Kennedy, S. Shao, R. Zhang, M. Irestedt, P.G.P. Ericson, M. Gelang, Y. Qu, F. Lei, and J. Fjelds√•. 2019. Near-complete phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the world‚Äôs babblers (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 130: 346‚Äď356. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.10.010

Price, T.D., D.M. Hooper, C.D. Buchanan, U.S. Johansson, D.T. Tietze, P. Alströn, U. Olsson, M. Ghosh-Harihar, F. Ishtiaq, S.K. Gupta, J. Martens, B. Harr, P. Singh, and D. Mohan. 2014. Niche filling slows the diversification of Himalayan songbirds. Nature 509: 222-225. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13272

 

 

FAMILIES (sequence)

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2018a), the sequence of families of the Tyrannoidea is revised, following Ohlson et al. (2008, 2012, 2013a, 2013b), Rheindt et al. (2008b), Tello et al. (2009), and Oliveros et al. (2019). Revise the sequence of these families to

 

Pipridae                                          Manakins

Cotingidae                                      Cotingas

Tityridae                                         Titryas and Allies

Oxyruncidae                                   Sharpbill, Royal Flycatcher, and Allies

Tyrannidae                                      Tyrant Flycatchers

 

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, B.M. Winger, and K. Winker. 2018. Fifty-ninth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 135: 798-813.

Ohlson, J.I., J. Fjelds√•, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2008. Tyrant flycatchers coming out in the open: phylogeny and ecological radiation of Tyrannidae (Aves, Passeriformes). Zoologica Scripta 37: 315‚Äď335. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00325.x

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, J. Fjeldså, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2012. Nuclear DNA from a 180-year old study skin reveals the phylogenetic position of the Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata (Passeriformes: Tyrannides). Ibis 154: 533-541. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-919X.2012.01243.x

Ohlson, J., J. Fjelds√•, and P.G.P. Ericson. 2013a. Molecular phylogeny of the manakins (Aves: Passeriformes: Pipridae), with a new classification and the description of a new genus. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 69: 796‚Äď804. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2013.06.024

Ohlson, J.I., M. Irestedt, P.G.P. Ericson, and J. Fjeldså. 2013. Phylogeny and classification of the New World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes). Zootaxa 3613: 1-35. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3613.1.1

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Rheindt, F.E., J.A. Norman, and L. Christidis. 2008b. Phylogenetic relationships of tyrant-flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae), with an emphasis on the elaeniine assemblage. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 46: 88‚Äď101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2007.09.011

Tello, J.G., R.G. Moyle, D.J. Marchese, and J. Cracraft. 2009. Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the tyrant flycatchers, cotingas, manakins, and their allies (Aves: Tyrannides). Cladistics 25: 429-467. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-0031.2009.00254.x

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the corvoid oscines is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., Norman et al. 2009, J√łnsson et al. 2011a, Aggerbeck et al. 2014, Barker 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of these families is

 

Campephagidae          Cuckooshrikes

Mohouidae                  Whiteheads

Neosittidae                  Sittellas

Psophodidae                Whipbirds and Wedgebills

Eulacestomatidae        Ploughbill

Oreoicidae                  Australo-Papuan Bellbirds

Falcunculidae             Shrike-tit

Paramythiidae             Tit Berrypecker and Crested Berrypecker

Vireonidae                  Vireos, Shrike-Babblers, and Erpornis

Pachycephalidae         Whistlers and Allies

Oriolidae                     Old World Orioles

Machaerirhynchidae   Boatbills

Artamidae                   Woodswallows, Bellmagpies, and Allies

Rhagologidae              Mottled Berryhunter

Platysteiridae              Wattle-eyes and Batises

Vangidae                     Vangas, Helmetshrikes, and Allies

Pityriasidae                 Bristlehead

Aegithinidae               Ioras

Malaconotidae            Bushshrikes and Allies

Rhipiduridae               Fantails

Dicruridae                   Drongos

Paradisaeidae              Birds-of-Paradise

Ifritidae                       Ifrita

Monarchidae               Monarch Flycatchers

Corcoracidae               White-winged Chough and Apostlebird

Melampittidae             Melampittas

Platylophidae              Crested Shrikejay

Laniidae                      Shrikes

Corvidae                     Crows, Jays, and Magpies

 

References:

Aggerbeck, M., J. Fjelds√•, L. Christidis, P.-H. Fabre, and K.A. J√łnsson. 2014. Resolving deep lineage divergences in core corvoid passerine birds supports a proto-Papuan island origin. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 70: 272-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2013.09.027

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 8.

J√łnsson, K.A., P.-H. Fabre, R.E. Ricklefs, and J. Fjelds√•. 2011a. Major global radiation of corvoid birds originated in the proto-Papuan archipelago. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 108: 2328‚Äď2333. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1018956108

Norman, J.A., P.G.P. Ericson, K.A. J√łnsson, J. Fjelds√•, and L. Christidis. 2009. A multi-gene phylogeny reveals novel relationships for aberrant genera of Australo-Papuan core Corvoidea and polyphyly of the Pachycephalidae and Psophodidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 52: 488-497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.03.019

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the basal passerids is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., J√łnsson et al. 2011, Aggerbeck et al. 2014, Barker 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of these families is

Cnemophilidae            Satinbirds

Melanocharitidae        Berrypeckers and Longbills

Callaeidae                   Wattlebirds

Notiomystidae            Stitchbird

Petroicidae                  Australasian Robins

Picathartidae               Rockfowl

Chaetopidae                Rockjumpers

Eupetidae                    Rail-babbler

 

References:

Aggerbeck, M., J. Fjelds√•, L. Christidis, P.-H. Fabre, and K.A. J√łnsson. 2014. Resolving deep lineage divergences in core corvoid passerine birds supports a proto-Papuan island origin. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 70: 272-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2013.09.027

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 8.

J√łnsson, K.A., P.-H. Fabre, R.E. Ricklefs, and J. Fjelds√•. 2011a. Major global radiation of corvoid birds originated in the proto-Papuan archipelago. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 108: 2328‚Äď2333. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1018956108

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the sylvioid oscines is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., Treplin et al. 2008, Fjeldså et al. 2010, Fregin et al. 2012, Alström et al. 2013b, Barker 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of families is

 

Hyliotidae                   Hyliotas

Stenostiridae               Fairy Flycatchers

Paridae                                    Tits, Chickadees, and Titmice

Remizidae                   Penduline-Tits

Alaudidae                    Larks

Panuridae                    Bearded Reedling

Nicatoridae                 Nicators

Macrosphenidae          African Warblers

Cisticolidae                 Cisticolas and Allies

Acrocephalidae           Reed Warblers and Allies

Locustellidae              Grassbirds and Allies

Donacobiidae              Donacobius

Bernieridae                 Malagasy Warblers

Pnoepygidae               Cupwings

Hirundinidae               Swallows

Pycnonotidae              Bulbuls

Phylloscopidae            Leaf Warblers

Scotocercidae             Bush Warblers and Allies

Aegithalidae                Long-tailed Tits

Sylviidae                     Sylviid Warblers, Parrobtills, and Allies

Zosteropidae               White-eyes, Yuhinas, and Allies

Timaliidae                   Tree-Babblers, Scimitar-Babblers, and Allies

Pellorneidae                Ground Babblers and Allies

Leiothrichidae             Laughingthrushes and Allies

Regulidae                    Kinglets

 

References:

Alstr√∂m, P., U. Olsson, and F. Lei. 2013b. A review of the recent advances in the systematics of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea. Chinese Birds 4: 99‚Äď131. https://doi.org/10.5122/cbirds.2013.0016

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 8.

Fjeldså, J., M. Irestedt, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2010. The Cinnamon Ibon Hypocryptadius cinnamomeus is a forest canopy sparrow. Ibis 152: 747-760. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-919X.2010.01053.x

Fregin, S., M. Haase, U. Olsson, and P. Alström. 2012. New insights into family relationships within the avian superfamily Sylvioidea (Passeriformes) based on seven molecular markers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 12: 157.

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Treplin, S., R. Siegert, C. Bleidorn, H.S. Thompson, R. Fotso, and R. Tiedemann. 2008. Molecular phylogeny of songbirds (Aves: Passeriformes) and the relative utility of common nuclear marker loci. Cladistics 24: 328-349. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-0031.2007.00178.x

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the certhioid oscines is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., Barker 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Barker 2017, Zhao et al. 2017, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of families is

 

Tichodromidae            Wallcreeper

Sittidae                        Nuthatches

Certhiidae                   Treecreepers

Polioptilidae               Gnatcatchers

Troglodytidae             Wrens

 

References:

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Barker, F.K. 2017. Molecular phylogenetics of the wrens and allies (Passeriformes: Certhioidea), with comments on the relationships of Ferminia. American Museum Novitates number 3887. https://doi.org/10.1206/3887.1

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Zhao, M., P. Alström, U. Olsson, Y. Qu, and F. Lei. 2016. Phylogenetic position of the Wallcreeper Tichodroma muraria. Journal of Ornithology 157: 913-918. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-016-1340-8

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the muscicapoid oscines is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., Alström et al. 2014, Barker 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Zhao et al. 2016, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of families is

 

Cinclidae                     Dippers

Buphagidae                 Oxpeckers

Sturnidae                     Starlings

Mimidae                      Mockingbirds and Thrashers

Turdidae                      Thrushes and Allies

Muscicapidae              Old World Flycatchers

 

References:

Alström, P., D.M. Hooper, Y. Liu, U. Olsson, D. Mohan, M. Gelang, H.L. Manh, J. Zhao, F. Lei, and T.D. Price. 2014. Discovery of a relict lineage and monotypic family of passerine birds. Biology Letters 10: 20131067. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2013.1067

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 8.

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

Zhao, M., P. Alström, U. Olsson, Y. Qu, and F. Lei. 2016. Phylogenetic position of the Wallcreeper Tichodroma muraria. Journal of Ornithology 157: 913-918. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-016-1340-8

 

—–

 

The sequence of families of the passeroid oscines (except for the nine-primaried oscines) is revised, based on recent phylogenetic studies (e.g., Barker 2014, Barker et al. 2014, Ericson et al. 2014, Barker et al. 2015, Päckert et al. 2016, Oliveros et al. 2019). The new sequence of families is

Promeropidae              Sugarbirds

Modulatricidae            Dapple-throat and Allies

Dicaeidae                    Flowerpeckers

Nectariniidae              Sunbirds and Spiderhunters

Irenidae                       Fairy-bluebirds

Chloropseidae             Leafbirds

Peucedramidae           Olive Warbler

Urocynchramidae¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† Przevalski’s Pinktail

Ploceidae                    Weavers and Allies

Estrildidae                   Waxbills and Allies

Viduidae                     Indigobirds

Prunellidae                  Accentors

Passeridae                   Old World Sparrows

Motacillidae                Wagtails and Pipits

 

References:

Barker, F.K. 2014. Mitogenomic data resolve basal relationships among passeriform and passeridan birds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 79: 313-324. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.011

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2013. Going to extremes: contrasting rates of diversification in a recent radiation of New World passerine birds. Systematic Biology 62: 298-320. https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/sys094

Barker, F.K., K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2015. New insights into New World biogeography: an integrated view from the phylogeny of blackbirds, cardinals, sparrows, tanagers, warblers, and allies. Auk 132: 333-348. http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1642/AUK-14-110.1

Ericson, P.G.P., S. Klopfstein, M. Irestedt, J.M.T. Nguyen, and J.A.A. Nylander. 2014. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Passeriformes (Aves). BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 8.

Oliveros, C.H., D.J. Field, D.T. Ksepka, F.K. Barker, A. Aleixo, M.J. Andersen, P. Alström, B.W. Benz, E.L. Braun, M.J. Braun, G.A. Bravo, R.T. Brumfield, R.T. Chesser, S. Claramunt, J. Cracraft, A.M. Cuervo, E.P. Derryberry, T.C. Glenn, M.G. Harvey, P.A. Hosner, L. Joseph, R.T. Kimball, A.L. Mack, C.M. Miskelly, A.T. Peterson, M.B. Robbins, F.H. Sheldon, L.F. Silveira, B.T. Smith, N.D. White, R.G. Moyle, and B.C. Faircloth. 2019. Earth history and the passerine superradiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116: 7916-7925. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1813206116

P√§ckert, M., J. Martens, Y.-H. Sun, and P. Struzenberger. 2016. The phylogenetic relationships of Przevalski’s Finch Urocynchramus pylzowi, the most ancient Tibetan endemic passerine known to date. Ibis 158: 530-540. https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12382

 

STANDARD UPDATES and CORRECTIONS

 

The compilation of these updates and corrections is in progress; a comprehensive roster of these revisions will be posted as soon as this documentation is available. Initially we post a subset of these updates and corrections, focusing on changes that affect the names (English or scientific) of species, or on the composition of species. In the meantime, please note that all revisions also are documented in the eBird/Clements Checklist v2019 downloadable spreadsheet.

 

page 110, Pale-backed Pigeon  Columba eversmanni

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Columba eversmanni from Pale-backed Pigeon to Yellow-eyed Pigeon.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 121, Wetar Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas hoedtii

page 121, Shy Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas stairi

page 121, Santa Cruz Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas sanctaecrucis

page 121, Thick-billed Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas salamonis

page 700, Tanna Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas ferrugineus

page 121, Bronze Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas beccarii

page 121, Palau Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas canifrons

page 120, White-bibbed Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas jobiensis

page 121, Marquesas Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas rubescens

page 120, Caroline Islands Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas kubaryi

page 120, Polynesian Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas erythropterus

page 121, White-throated Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas xanthonurus

page addition (2017), Norfolk Ground-Dove  Alopecoenas norfolkensis

Change the English name of all species of Alopecoenas ground-doves to ground dove, as ground doves do not form a monophyletic group.

Also change the English name of the monotypic group Alopecoenas beccarii beccarii from Bronze Ground-Dove (Western) to Bronze Ground Dove (Western); and change the English name of the polytypic group Alopecoenas beccarii [johannae Group] from Bronze Ground-Dove (Eastern) to Bronze Ground Dove (Eastern).

 

page 117, Common Ground-Dove  Columbina passerina

page 117, Plain-breasted Ground-Dove  Columbina minuta

page 117, Ruddy Ground-Dove  Columbina talpacoti

page 117, Ecuadorian Ground-Dove  Columbina buckleyi

page 117, Picui Ground-Dove  Columbina picui

page 118, Croaking Ground-Dove  Columbina cruziana

page 118, Blue-eyed Ground-Dove  Columbina cyanopis

page 118, Blue Ground-Dove  Claravis pretiosa

page 118, Maroon-chested Ground-Dove  Claravis mondetoura

page 118, Purple-winged Ground-Dove  Claravis geoffroyi

page 118, Bare-faced Ground-Dove  Metriopelia ceciliae

page 118, Bare-eyed Ground-Dove  Metriopelia morenoi

page 118, Black-winged Ground-Dove  Metriopelia melanoptera

page 118, Golden-spotted Ground-Dove  Metriopelia aymara

page 118, Long-tailed Ground-Dove  Uropelia campestris

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), Maroon-chested Ground-Dove Claravis mondetoura and Purple-winged Ground-Dove Claravis geoffroyi are removed from Claravis, following genetic evidence that Claravis is not monophyletic (Sweet and Johnson 2015, Sweet et al. 2017); these two species now are classified in the newly described genus Paraclaravis Sangster, Sweet, and Johnson 2018 (Sangster et al. 2018).

Also, in accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019) and AOS-SACC (Proposal 530), the hyphen is removed from the English group name “ground-dove” for all species of Columbina, Claravis, Paraclaravis, Metriopelia, and Uropelia, as ground doves do not form a monophyletic group.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Sangster, G., A.D. Sweet, and K.P. Johnson. 2018. Paraclaravis, a new genus for the Purple-winged and Maroon-chested Ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae). Zootaxa 4461: 134-140. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4461.1.10

Sweet, A.D., and K.P. Johnson. 2015. Patterns of diversification in small New World ground doves are consistent with major geologic events. Auk 132: 300-312.  https://doi.org/10.1642/AUK-14-193.1

Sweet, A.D., J.D. Maddox, and K.P. Johnson. 2017. A complete molecular phylogeny of Claravis confirms its paraphyly within small New World ground-doves (Aves: Peristerinae) and implies multiple plumage state transitions. Journal of Avian Biology 48: 459-464.  https://doi.org/10.1111/jav.01077

 

page 120, Sulawesi Ground-Dove  Gallicolumba tristigmata

page 120, Cinnamon Ground-Dove  Gallicolumba rufigula

Change the English name of Gallicolumba tristigmata from Sulawesi Ground-Dove to Sulawesi Ground Dove, and change the English name of Gallicolumba rufigula from Cinnamon Ground-Dove to Cinnamon Ground Dove, as ground doves do not form a monophyletic group.

 

page 122, Pink-necked Pigeon  Treron vernans

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Kennedy et al. 2000, Robson 2000, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron vernans from Pink-necked Pigeon to Pink-necked Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Kennedy, R.S., P.C. Gonzales, E.C. Dickinson, H.C. Miranda, Jr., and T.H. Fisher. 2000. A guide to the birds of the Philippines. Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford, United Kingdom.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 122, Cinnamon-headed Pigeon  Treron fulvicollis

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Wells 1999, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron fulvicollis from Cinnamon-headed Pigeon to Cinnamon-headed Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 122, Orange-breasted Pigeon  Treron bicinctus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron bicinctus from Orange-breasted Pigeon to Orange-breasted Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 122, Thick-billed Pigeon  Treron curvirostra

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Wells 1999, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron curvirostra from Thick-billed Pigeon to Thick-billed Green-Pigeon.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Treron curvirostra curvirostra from Thick-billed Pigeon (Thick-billed) to Thick-billed Green-Pigeon (Thick-billed).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Treron curvirostra hypothapsinus from Thick-billed Pigeon (Barusan) to Thick-billed Green-Pigeon (Barusan).

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 122, Gray-cheeked Pigeon  Treron griseicauda

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron griseicauda from Gray-cheeked Pigeon to Gray-cheeked Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 122, Yellow-footed Pigeon  Treron phoenicopterus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005), change the English name of Treron phoenicopterus from Yellow-footed Pigeon to Yellow-footed Green-Pigeon.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 123, Yellow-vented Pigeon  Treron seimundi

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Wells 1999, Robson 2000), change the English name of Treron seimundi from Yellow-vented Pigeon to Yellow-vented Green-Pigeon.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 123, Pin-tailed Pigeon  Treron apicauda

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Robson 2000, Rasmussen and Anderon 2005), change the English name of Treron apicauda from Pin-tailed Pigeon to Pin-tailed Green-Pigeon.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 123, Green-spectacled Pigeon  Treron oxyurus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron oxyurus from Green-spectacled Pigeon to Green-spectacled Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

 

page 123, Wedge-tailed Pigeon  Treron sphenurus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Wells 1999, Robson 2000, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Treron spenurus from Wedge-tailed Pigeon to Wedge-tailed Green-Pigeon.

References:

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 123, White-bellied Pigeon  Treron sieboldii

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Robson 2000), change the English name of Treron sieboldii from White-bellied Pigeon to White-bellied Green-Pigeon.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Robson, C. 2000. A guide to the birds of southeast Asia. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 87, Indian Bustard  Ardeotis nigriceps

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Ardeotis nigriceps from Indian Bustard to Great Indian Bustard.

References:

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 179, Malaysian Nightjar  Lyncornis temminckii

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Wells 1999, Cleere 2010, Eaton et al. 2016), change the English name of Lyncornis temminckii from Malaysian Nightjar to Malaysian Eared-Nightjar.

Reference:

Cleere, N. 2010. Nightjars: potoos, frogmouths, Oilbird and owlet-nightjars of the world. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Eaton, J.A., B. van Balen, N.W. Brickle, and F.E. Rheindt. 2016. Birds of the Indonesian Archipelago: Greater Sundas and Wallacea. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.

Wells, D.R. 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsula. Volume One. Academic Press, London.

 

page 209, White-throated Wedgebill  Schistes albogularis

page 209, Geoffroy’s Wedgebill¬† Schistes geoffroyi

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 799), change the English name of Schistes albogularis from White-throated Wedgebill to Choco Daggerbill, and change the English name of Schistes geoffroyi from Geoffroy’s Wedgebill to Geoffroy’s Daggerbill.

 

page 196, Racket-tailed Coquette  Discosura longicaudus

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 807), change the English name of Discosura longicaudus from Racket-tailed Coquette to Racket-tipped Thorntail.

 

page 208, Buffy Helmetcrest  Oxypogon stubelii

Correct the spelling of the species name from stubelii to stuebelii (Dickinson and Remsen 2015).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2015. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Errata and corrigenda to volume 1.

 

page 204, White-tailed Hillstar  Urochroa leucura

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 800), change the English name of Urochroa leucura from White-tailed Hillstar to Green-backed Hillstar.

 

page 203, Amethyst-throated Hummingbird  Lampornis amethystinus

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the English name of Lampornis amethystinus from Amethyst-throated Hummingbird to Amethyst-throated Mountain-gem.

Change the English name for the polytypic group Lampornis amethystinus [amethystinus Group] from Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Amethyst-throated) to Amethyst-throated Mountain-gem (Amethyst-throated).

Change the English name for the monotypic group Lampornis amethystinus margaritae from Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Violet-throated) to Amethyst-throated Mountain-gem (Violet-throated).

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

page 203, Blue-throated Hummingbird  Lampornis clemenciae

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the English name of Lampornis clemenciae from Blue-throated Hummingbird to Blue-throated Mountain-gem.

Reference:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

pages 210-211, bee hummingbirds  Trochilidae

The sequence of genera of bee hummingbirds is revised, following McGuire et al. (2014), Licona-Vera and Ornelas (2017), and Clark et al. (2018). The new sequence of genera is

Tilmatura

Calliphlox

Thaumastura

Myrmia

Myrtisa

Rhodopis

Eulidia

Microstilbon

Chaetocercus

Philodice

Doricha

Calothorax

Archilochus

Nesophlox

Mellisuga

Calypte

Atthis

Selasphorus

References:

Clark, C.J., J.A. McGuire, E. Bonaccorso, J.S. Berv, and R.O. Prum. 2018. Complex coevolution of wing, tail, and vocal sounds of courting male bee hummingbirds. Evolution 72: 630‚Äď646.¬† https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13432

Licona-Vera, Y., and J.F. Ornelas. 2017. The conquering of North America: dated phylogenetic and biogeographic inference of migratory behavior in bee hummingbirds. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 126.

McGuire, J.A., C.C. Witt, J.V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D.L. Rabosky, D.L. Altshuler, and R. Dudley. 2014. Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Current Biology 24: 910-916.       https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016

 

page 210, Magenta-throated Woodstar  Calliphlox bryantae

page 210, Purple-throated Woodstar  Calliphlox mitchellii

Change the scientific name of Magenta-throated Woodstar from Calliphlox bryantae to Philodice bryantae, and change the scientific name of Purple-throated Woodstar from Calliphlox mitchellii to Philodice mitchellii (McGuire et al. 2014, Licona-Vera and Ornelas 2017, Clark et al. 2018).

References:

Clark, C.J., J.A. McGuire, E. Bonaccorso, J.S. Berv, and R.O. Prum. 2018. Complex coevolution of wing, tail, and vocal sounds of courting male bee hummingbirds. Evolution 72: 630‚Äď646.¬† https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13432

Licona-Vera, Y., and J.F. Ornelas. 2017. The conquering of North America: dated phylogenetic and biogeographic inference of migratory behavior in bee hummingbirds. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 126.

McGuire, J.A., C.C. Witt, J.V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D.L. Rabosky, D.L. Altshuler, and R. Dudley. 2014. Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Current Biology 24: 910-916.       https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016

 

page 210, Bahama Woodstar  Calliphlox evelynae

page 210, Inagua Woodstar  Calliphlox lyrura

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), Bahama Woodstar Calliphlox lyrura and Inagua Woodstar Calliphlox evelynae are placed in the genus Nesophlox based on genetic data that Calliphlox is polyphyletic and that Bahama and Inagua woodstars are not closely related to true Calliphlox (McGuire et al. 2014, Licona-Vera and Ornelas 2017, Clark et al. 2018).

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Clark, C.J., J.A. McGuire, E. Bonaccorso, J.S. Berv, and R.O. Prum. 2018. Complex coevolution of wing, tail, and vocal sounds of courting male bee hummingbirds. Evolution 72: 630‚Äď646.¬† https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13432

Licona-Vera, Y., and J.F. Ornelas. 2017. The conquering of North America: dated phylogenetic and biogeographic inference of migratory behavior in bee hummingbirds. BMC Evolutionary Biology 17: 126.

McGuire, J.A., C.C. Witt, J.V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D.L. Rabosky, D.L. Altshuler, and R. Dudley. 2014. Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Current Biology 24: 910-916.       https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016

 

page 78, Madagascar Wood-Rail  Canirallus kioloides

page addition (2011), Tsingy Wood-Rail  Canirallus beankaensis

The genus Canirallus is not monophyletic: the type species of the genus, Gray-throated Rail Canirallus oceleus, is a member of Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, and Coots), whereas the two species of Malagasy wood-rails are members of Sarothruridae (Flufftails) (Boast et al. 2019). Change the scientific name of Madagascar Wood-Rail from Canirallus kioloides to Mentocrex kioloides, and change the scientific name of Tsingy Wood-Rail from Canirallus beankaensis to Mentocrex beankaensis.

Reference:

Boast, A.P., B. Chapman, M.B. Herrera, T.H. Worthy, R.P. Scofield, A.J.D. Tennyson, P. Houde, M. Bunce, A. Cooper, and K.J. Mitchell. 2019. Mitochondrial genomes from New Zealand’s extinct adzebills (Aves: Aptornithidae: Aptornis) support a sister-taxon relationship with the Afro-Madagascan Sarothruridae. Diversity 11: 24.   https://doi.org/10.3390/d11020024

 

page 85, Lesser Moorhen  Gallinula angulata

Lesser Moorhen is not a member of the genus Gallinula, but instead is basal to Gallinula and Fulica (Garcia-R et al. 2014, Sangster et al. 2015a). Change the scientific name from Gallinula angulata to Paragallinula angulata. Reposition Lesser Moorhen to follow Dot-winged Crake Porzana spiloptera.

References:

Garcia-R., J.C., G.C. Gibb, and S.A. Trewick. 2014. Deep global evolutionary radiation in birds: diversification and trait evolution in the cosmopolitan bird family Rallidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 81: 96‚Äď108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.09.008

Sangster, G., J.C. Garcia-R, and S.A. Trewick. 2015. A new genus for the Lesser Moorhen Gallinula angulata Sundevall, 1850 (Aves, Rallidae). European Journal of Taxonomy 153: 1‚Äď8. https://doi.org/10.5852/ejt.2015.153

 

page 99, Spoon-billed Sandpiper  Calidris pygmea

Correct the spelling of the species name from pygmea to pygmaea (Dickinson and Remsen 2015).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2015. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Errata and corrigenda to volume 1.

 

page 18, Lesser Frigatebird  Fregata ariel

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for the polytypic group Lesser Frigatebird (Lesser) from Fregata ariel ariel/iredaeli to Fregata ariel ariel/iredalei.

 

page 18, Pygmy Cormorant  Microcarbo pygmeus

Correct the spelling of the species name from pygmeus to pygmaeus (Dickinson and Remsen 2015).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2015. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Errata and corrigenda to volume 1.

 

page 15, Brown Pelican  Pelecanus occidentalis

Correct the English name for the monotypic group Pelecanus occidentalis urinator from Brown Pelican (Galapagpos) to Brown Pelican (Galapagos).

 

page 38, Black-breasted Snake-Eagle  Circaetus pectoralis

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001, Gill and Wright 2006, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), change the English name of Circaetus pectoralis from Black-breasted Snake-Eagle to Black-chested Snake-Eagle.

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

Gill, F., and M. Wright. 2006. Birds of the world: recommended English names. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 43, Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk  Accipiter rufiventris

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Brown and Amadon 1968, Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001, Gill and Wright 2006), change the English name of Accipiter rufiventris from Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk to Rufous-breasted Sparrowhawk.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Accipiter rufiventris perspicillaris from Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk (Ethiopian) to Rufous-breasted Sparrowhawk (Ethiopian).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Accipiter rufiventris rufiventris from Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk (Rufous-chested) to Rufous-breasted Sparrowhawk (Rufous-breasted).

References:

Brown, L., and D. Amadon. 1968. Eagles, hawks and falcons of the world. McGraw Hill, New York, New York.

Ferguson-Lees, J., and D.A. Christie. 2001. Raptors of the world. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston and New York.

Gill, F., and M. Wright. 2006. Birds of the world: recommended English names. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 216, Northern Silvery-Kingfisher  Ceyx flumenicolus

Correct the spelling of the species name from flumenicolus to flumenicola (Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2013. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 1. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 257, Black-bodied Woodpecker  Dryocopus schulzi

Correct the spelling of the species name from schulzi to schulzii (Dickinson and Christidis 2015).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and J.V. Remsen, Jr. (editors). 2015. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Errata and corrigenda to volume 1.

 

page 140, Long-tailed Parakeet  Psittacula longicauda

Correct the English name of the monotypic group Psittacula longicauda modesta from Long-tailed Parakeet (Enganno) to Long-tailed Parakeet (Enggano).

 

page 700, Stephens Island Wren  Traversia lyall

Correct the spelling of the species name from lyall to lyalli.

 

page 295, Checker-throated Antwren  Epinecrophylla fulviventris

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla fulviventris from Checker-throated Antwren to Checker-throated Stipplethroat.

 

page 295, Brown-bellied Antwren  Epinecrophylla gutturalis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla gutturalis from Brown-bellied Antwren to Brown-bellied Antwren Stipplethroat.

 

page 295, White-eyed Antwren  Epinecrophylla leucophthalma

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla leucophthalma from White-eyed Antwren to White-eyed Stipplethroat.

 

page 295, Madeira Antwren  Epinecrophylla amazonica

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla amazonica from Madeira Antwren to Rio Madeira Stipplethroat.

Change the English name for the monotypic group Epinecrophylla amazonica amazonica from Madeira Antwren (Madeira) to Rio Madeira Stipplethroat (Madeira).

Change the English name for the monotypic group Epinecrophylla amazonica dentei from Madeira Antwren (Roosevelt) to Rio Madeira Stipplethroat (Roosevelt).

 

page 295, Foothill Antwren  Epinecrophylla spodionota

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla spodionota from Foothill Antwren to Foothill Stipplethroat.

 

page 295, Ornate Antwren  Epinecrophylla ornata

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla ornata from Ornate Antwren to Ornate Stipplethroat.

Change the English name for the polytypic group Epinecrophylla ornata [ornata Group] from Ornate Antwren (Western) to Ornate Stipplethroat (Western).

Change the English name for the monotypic group Epinecrophylla ornata hoffmannsi from Ornate Antwren (Eastern) to Ornate Stipplethroat (Eastern).

 

page 295, Rufous-tailed Antwren  Epinecrophylla erythrura

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 696.2), change the English name of Epinecrophylla erythrura from Rufous-tailed Antwren to Rufous-tailed Stipplethroat.

 

page 270, Tawny Tit-Spinetail  Leptasthenura yanacensis

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 816), Tawny Tit-Spinetail Leptasthenura yanacensis is transferred to the genus Sylviorthorhynchus, following Derryberry et al. (2011). Change the scientific name to Sylviorthorhynchus yanacensis, and reposition Tawny Tit-Spinetail to follow Des Murs’s Wiretail Sylviorthorhynchus desmursii.

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.Derryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. P√©rez-Em√°n, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973‚Äď2986. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01374.x

 

page 274, Sulphur-throated Spinetail  Cranioleuca sulphurifera

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 815), Sulphur-throated Spinetail Cranioleuca sulphurifera is transferred to the genus Limnoctites, following Derryberry et al. (2011). Change the change the scientific name to Limnoctites sulphuriferus, and change the English name to Sulphur-bearded Reedhaunter. Repostion Sulphur-bearded Reedhaunter to follow Straight-billed Reedhaunter Limnoctites rectirostris.

Reference:

Derryberry, E.P., S. Claramunt, G.Derryberry, R.T. Chesser, J. Cracraft, A. Aleixo, J. P√©rez-Em√°n, J. V. Remsen, Jr., and R.T. Brumfield. 2011. Lineage diversification and morphological evolution in a large-scale continental radiation: the Neotropical ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution 65: 2973‚Äď2986. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01374.x

 

page 516, Western Grasswren  Amytornis textilis

Change the English name for the monotypic group Amytornis textilis myall from Western Grasswren (Gawler Range) to Western Grasswren (Gawler Ranges). Revise the range description from “Gawler Range and n Eyre Peninsula (South Australia)” to “south central Australia (Gawler Ranges and northern Eyre Peninsula, South Australia)”.

 

page 371, Black Cicadabird  Edolisoma melan

Correct the spelling of the species name from melan to melas (David and Gosselin 2002a).

Correct the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from melan to melas.

Reference:

David, N., and M. Gosselin. 2002.¬† Gender agreement of avian species names. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 122: 14-49.

 

page 621, Thick-billed Vireo  Vireo crassirostris

In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), the monotypic group Thick-billed Vireo (Old Providence) Vireo crassirostris approximans is transferred Mangrove Vireo Vireo pallens, following Bond (1961), Barlow (1990), and Donegan et al. (2015). Change the English and scientific names to Mangrove Vireo (Providencia) Vireo pallens approximans.

References:

Barlow, J.C. 1990. Songs of the vireos & their allies. Revised edition

. ARA Records, Gainesville, Florida.

Bond, J. 1961. Birds of the West Indies. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts.

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Donegan, T., A. Quevedo, J.C. Verhelst, O. Cort√©s-Herrera, T. Ellery, and P. Salaman. 2015. Revision of the status of bird species occurring in Colombia, with discussion of BirdLife International’s new taxonomy. Conservaci√≥n Colombiana 23: 3-48. http://www.proaves.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Listado-y-Splits-Conservacion-Colombiana-23-3-48.pdf

 

page 595, Collared Crow  Corvus torquatus

The species name torquatus is believed to be preoccupied in Corvus; therefore change the species name for Collared Crow to the oldest available name, pectoralis (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 525, Black-breasted Tit  Periparus rufonuchalis

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Periparus rufonuchalis from Black-breasted Tit to Rufous-naped Tit.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 422, Black-collared Apalis  Oreolais pulchra

Correct the spelling of the species name from pulchra to pulcher (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Correct the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from pulchra to pulcher.

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 442, Fly River Grassbird  Megalurus albolimbatus

page 442, Spinifexbird  Megalurus carteri

page 442, Little Grassbird  Megalurus gramineus

page 700, Chatham Islands Fernbird  Megalurus rufescens

page 442, Fernbird  Megalurus punctatus

The genus Megalurus is not monophyletic (Alström et al. 2011a, 2018b). Change the scientific name of Fly River Grassbird from Megalurus albolimbatus to Poodytes albolimbatus.

Change the scientific name of Spinifexbird from Megalurus carteri to Poodytes carteri.

Change the scientific name of Little Grassbird from Megalurus gramineus to Poodytes gramineus.

Change the scientific name of Chatham Islands Fernbird from Megalurus rufescens to Poodytes rufescens.

Change the scientific name of Fernbird from Megalurus punctatus to Poodytes punctatus, and change the English name to New Zealand Fernbird.

References:

Alstr√∂m, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513‚Äď526. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.12.012

Alstr√∂m, P., A. Cibois, M. Irestedt, D. Zuccon, M. Gelang, J. Fjelds√•, M.J. Andersen, R.G. Moyle, E. Pasquet, and U. Olsson. 2018b. Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 127: 367‚Äď375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.029

 

page 442, Brown Songlark  Megalurus cruralis

page 442, Bismarck Thicketbird  Megalurulus grosvenori

page 442, Rusty Thicketbird  Megalurulus rubiginosus

page 442, Buff-banded Bushbird  Buettikoferella bivittata

page 442, Rufous Songlark  Megalurulus mathewsi

page 442, New Caledonian Grassbird  Megalurulus mariei

page 442, Bougainville Thicketbird  Megalurulus llaneae

page 442, Long-legged Thicketbird  Trichocichla rufa

page 442, Guadalcanal Thicketbird  Megalurulus whitneyi

page 441, Tawny Grassbird  Megalurus timoriensis

pages 441-442, Papuan Grassbird  Megalurus macrurus

Brown Songlark, Bismark Thicketbird, Rusty Thicketbird, Buff-banded Bushbird, Rufous Songlark, New Caledonian Grassbird, Bougainville Thicketbird, Long-legged Warbler, Guadalcanal Thicketbird, Tawny Grassbird, and Papuan Grassbird all belong to a clade composed of species formerly assigned to the genera Megalurus, Buettikoferella, Megalurulus, and Trichocichla (Alström et al. 2011a, 2018b), for which group the oldest available name is Cincloramphus (Dickinson and Christidis 2014). Change the scientific name of Brown Songlark from Megalurus cruralis to Cincloramphus cruralis.

Change the scientific name of Bismarck Thicketbird from Megalurulus grosvenori to Cincloramphus grosvenori.

Change the scientific name of Rusty Thicketbird from Megalurulus rubiginosus to Cincloramphus rubiginosus.

Change the scientific name of Buff-banded Bushbird from Buettikoferella bivittata to Cincloramphus bivittatus.

Change the scientific name of Rufous Songlark from Megalurulus mathewsi to Cincloramphus mathewsi.

Change the scientific name of New Caledonian Grassbird from Megalurulus mariei to Cincloramphus mariei.

Change the scientific name of Bougainville Thicketbird from Megalurulus llaneae to Cincloramphus llaneae.

Change the scientific name of Long-legged Warbler from Trichocichla rufa to Cincloramphus rufus, and change the English name to Long-leged Thicketbird. Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from rufa to rufus.

Change the scientific name of Guadalcanal Thicketbird from Megalurulus whitneyi to Cincloramphus whitneyi. Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Guadalcanal Thicketbird (Santo) from Megalurulus whitneyi whitneyi to Cincloramphus whitneyi whitneyi. Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Guadalcanal Thicketbird (Guadlacanal) from Megalurulus whitneyi turipavae to Cincloramphus whitneyi turipavae.

Change the scientific name of Tawny Grassbird from Megalurus timoriensis to Cincloramphus timoriensis.

Change the name of Papuan Grassbird Megalurus macrurus to Papuan Grassbird Cincloramphus macrurus.

The sequence of genera and species of grassbirds and related species is revised, as follows:

Fly River Grassbird  Poodytes albolimbatus

Spinifexbird  Poodytes carteri

Little Grassbird  Poodytes gramineus

Chatham Islands Fernbird  Poodytes rufescens

New Zealand Fernbird  Poodytes punctatus

Malia  Malia grata

Brown Songlark  Cincloramphus cruralis

Bismarck Thicketbird  Cincloramphus grosvenori

Rusty Thicketbird  Cincloramphus rubiginosus

Buff-banded Bushbird  Cincloramphus bivittatus

Rufous Songlark  Cincloramphus mathewsi

New Caledonian Grassbird  Cincloramphus mariei

Bougainville Thicketbird  Cincloramphus llaneae

Long-legged Thicketbird  Cincloramphus rufus

Guadalcanal Thicketbird  Cincloramphus whitneyi

Tawny Grassbird  Cincloramphus timoriensis

Papuan Grassbird  Cincloramphus macrurus

Striated Grassbird  Megalurus palustris

Fan-tailed Grassbird  Schoenicola brevirostris

Broad-tailed Grassbird  Schoenicola platyurus

References:

Alstr√∂m, P., S. Fregin, J.A Norman, P.G.P. Ericson, L. Christidis, and U. Olsson. 2011a. Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58: 513‚Äď526. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.12.012

Alstr√∂m, P., A. Cibois, M. Irestedt, D. Zuccon, M. Gelang, J. Fjelds√•, M.J. Andersen, R.G. Moyle, E. Pasquet, and U. Olsson. 2018b. Comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the grassbirds and allies (Locustellidae) reveals extensive non-monophyly of traditional genera, and a proposal for a new classification. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 127: 367‚Äď375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.029

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 429, Eurasian River Warbler  Locustella fluviatilis

Sibley and Monroe (1990) and Clements (1991) adopted the English name Eurasian River Warbler to differentiate Locustella fluviatilis from Myiothlypis rivularis, at the time variously known as River Warbler or Neotropical River Warbler. Given that the English name for Myiothlypis rivularis now is Riverbank Warbler, there no longer is conflict between the names for these two species; therefore, we simplify the English name of Locustella fluviatilis to River Warbler.

Reference:

Clements, J.F. 1991. Birds of the world: a check list. Ibis Publishing Company, Vista, California.

Sibley, C.G., and B.L. Monroe, Jr. 1990. Distribution and taxonomy of birds of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut.

 

page 360, Northern Rough-winged Swallow  Stelgidopteryx serripennis

Subspecies stuarti, previously included in the polytypic group Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Northern) Stelgidopteryx serripennis [serripennis Group], properly belongs in the group Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Ridgway’s). Change the scientific name of the latter from Stelgidopteryx serripennis ridgwayi to Stelgidopteryx serripennis ridgwayi/stuarti.

Revise the range description for nominate serripennis from “SE Alaska to Arizona, New Mexico, e Texas and Gulf States” to “breeds from southeastern Alaska east to southern Quebec, south to central California and Florida; winters from Mexico and Florida south to central Panama”.

Revise the range description for subspecies psammochrous from “S California to Baja, s Texas and s Mexico (Oaxaca)” to “breeds from southwestern United States (southern California east to southeastern Texas) and northern Baja California south to southwestern Mexico and perhaps El Salvador; winters from southernmost United States south to Panama, although southernmost breeding populations possibly resident”.

Revise the range description for subspecies fulvipennis from “S Mexico (Oaxaca and Veracruz) to highlands of Costa Rica” to “breeds southern Mexico (except Yucat√°n Peninsula), north to central Veracruz, and south to central Costa Rica; mainly resident, but some migrate south to central Panama”.

Revise the range description for subspecies burleighi from “Belize and Guatemala (s Yucat√°n Peninsula)” to “resident in the southern Yucat√°n Peninsula (northern Guatemala and Belize)”.

Revise the range description for subspecies ridgwayi from “SE Mexico (n Yucat√°n Peninsula)” to “resident in the northern Yucat√°n Peninsula (southeastern Mexico in northern Campeche, Yucat√°n, and central Quintana Roo)”.

Revise the range description for subspecies stuarti from “S Veracruz, Oaxaca and Chiapas” to “resident in southern Mexico (southern Veracruz, northern Oaxaca, and Chiapas), northern Guatemala, and northern Belize”.

 

page 362, Forest Swallow  Petrochelidon fuliginosa

Forest Swallow is not a member of the genus Petrochelidon, but instead is more closely related to house-martins (Delichon) (de Silva et al. 2018). Change the scientific name from Petrochelidon fuliginosa to Atronanus fuliginosus, and reposition Forest Swallow to follow Chestnut-collared Swallow Petrochelidon rufocollaris.

Reference:

de Silva, T.N., S.W. Fernando, M.B. Robbins, J.C. Cooper, E.B. Fokam, and A.T. Peterson. 2018. Recognition of a new generic-level swallow taxon from central Africa. Journal of Avian Biology 49: e01698. https://doi.org/10.1111/jav.01698

 

page 379, Shelley’s Greenbul¬† Arizelocichla masukuensis

page 379, Eastern Mountain Greenbul  Arizelocichla nigriceps

Subspecies kungwensis, formerly included in the group Eastern Mountain Greenbul (Mountain) Arizelocichla nigriceps [nigriceps Group], instead belongs with Shelley’s Greenbul Arizelocichla masukuensis (Turner and Pearson 2015), and is added to the group Shelley’s Greenbul (Kakamega). Change the scientific name of this group from Arizelocichla masukuensis kakamegae to Arizelocichla masukuensis kakamegae/kungwensis.

Reference:

Turner, D.A., and D.J. Pearson. 2015. Systematic and taxonomic issues concerning some East African bird species, notably those where treatment varies between authors. Scopus 34: 1-23.

 

page 379, Western Mountain-Greenbul  Arizelocichla tephrolaema

Change the English name of Arizelocichla tephrolaema from Western Mountain-Greenbul to Western Mountain Greenbul.

 

page 438, Pale-rumped Warbler  Phylloscopus chloronotus

In accord with prevailing usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Phylloscopus chloronotus from Pale-rumped Warbler to Lemon-rumped Warbler.

References:

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 440, Golden-spectacled Warbler  Phylloscopus burkii

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Phylloscopus burkii from Golden-spectacled Warbler to Green-crowned Warbler.

References:

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 425, Manchurian Bush Warbler  Horornis borealis

Subspecies canturians, previously included in Japanese Bush Warbler Horornis diphone, instead belongs with Manchurian Bush Warbler (Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Kennerly and Pearson 2010). Insert canturians immediately following the heading for Manchurian Bush Warbler. Because canturians Swinhoe 1860 is an older name than borealis Campbell 1892, change the scientific name of Manchurian Bush Warbler from Horornis borealis to Horornis canturians.

Change the scientific name of subspecies borealis from Horornis borealis borealis to Horornis canturians borealis.

Change the scientific name of subspecies canturians from Horornis diphone canturians to Horornis canturians canturians.

References:

Kennerly, P., and D. Pearson. 2010. Reed and bush warblers. Christopher Helm, London.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 509, Bush Blackcap  Sylvia nigricapilla

Correct the spelling of the species name from nigricapilla to nigricapillus (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 444, Rufous-vented Warbler  Sylvia subcaerulea

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Urban et al. 1997, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name from Rufous-vented Warbler to Chestnut-vented Warbler. Correct the spelling of the species name from subcaerulea to subcoerulea (Dickinson and Christidis 2014, David and Dickinson 2016).

Correct the spelling of the nominate subspecies subcaerulea to subcoerulea.

References:

David, N., and E.C. Dickinson. 2016. The ligatures ‚Äź√¶‚Äź and ‚Äźoe‚Äź in Vieillot‚Äôs new avian names established in the Nouveau dictionnaire d‚Äôhistoire naturelle vols. I‚ÄźXXXVI (1816‚Äź1819). Zoological Bibliography 4: 15-26.

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry, and S. Keith. 1997. The birds of Africa. Volume V. Academic Press, London.

 

page 511, Three-toed Parrotbill  Cholornis paradoxa

Correct the spelling of the species name from paradoxa to paradoxus (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Correct the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from paradoxa to paradoxus.

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

pages 549-551, African and Indian Ocean white-eyes  Zosterops

The sequence of species of African and Indian Ocean white-eyes is revised, primarily based on Melo et al. (2011) and Cox et al. (2014). The new sequence is as follows

Marianne White-eye   Zosterops semiflavus

Comoro White-eye     Zosterops mouroniensis

Reunion White-eye     Zosterops olivaceus

Mauritius White-eye   Zosterops chloronothos

Reunion Gray White-eye        Zosterops borbonicus

Mauritius Gray White-eye      Zosterops mauritianus

Abyssinian White-eye             Zosterops abyssinicus

Principe White-eye     Zosterops ficedulinus

Annobon White-eye   Zosterops griseovirescens

Sao Tome White-eye  Zosterops feae

Black-capped Speirops           Zosterops lugubris

Principe Speirops        Zosterops leucophaeus

Mbulu White-eye        Zosterops mbuluensis

Pale White-eye           Zosterops flavilateralis

Seychelles White-eye Zosterops modestus

Moheli White-eye       Zosterops comorensis

Madagascar White-eye           Zosterops maderaspatanus

Kirk’s White-eye¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† Zosterops kirki

Mayotte White-eye     Zosterops mayottensis

Aldabra White-eye     Zosterops aldabrensis

Anjouan White-eye     Zosterops anjuanensis

Taita White-eye          Zosterops silvanus

Orange River White-eye         Zosterops pallidus

South Pare White-eye Zosterops winifredae

Cape White-eye          Zosterops virens

Cameroon Speirops    Zosterops melanocephalus

Bioko Speirops           Zosterops brunneus

Heuglin’s White-eye¬†¬† Zosterops poliogastrus

Kikuyu White-eye      Zosterops kikuyuensis

Kilimanjaro White-eye           Zosterops eurycricotus

African Yellow White-eye     Zosterops senegalensis

Pemba White-eye                   Zosterops vaughani

References:

Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys‚ÄźJones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day. 2014. Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white‚Äźeyes (Aves: Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology 23: 4103-4118. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12840

Melo, M., B.H. Warren, and P.J. Jones. 2011. Rapid parallel evolution of aberrant traits in the diversification of the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology 20: 4953-4967.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05099.x

 

page 419, Rufous-vented Prinia  Laticilla burnesii

Change the English name for Laticilla burnesii from Rufous-vented Prinia to Rufous-vented Grass Babbler (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 419, Swamp Prinia  Laticilla cinerascens

Change the English name for Laticilla cineascens from Swamp Prinia to Swamp Grass Babbler (Rasmussen and Anderton 2012, Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

References:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 490, Wynaad Laughingthrush  Ianthocincla delesserti

Change the English name of Ianthocincla delesserti from Wynaad Laughingthrush to Wayanad Laughingthrush, following Praveen et al. (2019).

Reference:

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2019. Updates to the checklists of birds of India, and the South Asia region-2019. Indian Birds 15: 1-9

 

page 385, Goldcrest  Regulus regulus

Correct the spelling of the scientific name for the monotypic group Goldcrest (western Canary Islands) from Regulus regulus ellenthalarae to Regulus regulus ellenthalerae.

 

pages 529-530, Eurasian Nuthatch  Sitta europaea

Correct the scientific name of the polytypic group Eurasian Nuthatch (Chinese) from Sitta europaea sinensis/formasana to Sitta europaea sinensis/formosana.

 

page 602, Red-billed Oxpecker  Buphagus erythrorhynchus

Correct the spelling of the species name from erythrorhynchus to the original spelling erythrorynchus.

 

page 600, Black-bellied Starling  Notopholia corrusca

Correct the spelling of the species name from corrusca to corusca (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Correct the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from corrusca to corusca.

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom.

 

page 449, Dusky-brown Flycatcher  Muscicapa adusta

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Zimmerman et al. 1996, Urban et al. 1997, Borrow and Demey 2001, Stevenson and Fanshawe 2002), change the English name of Muscicapa adusta from Dusky-brown Flycatcher to African Dusky Flycatcher.

References:

Borrow, N., and R. Demey. 2001. A guide to birds of western Africa. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Stevenson, R., and J. Fanshawe. 2002. Field guide to the birds of East Africa. T & A D Poyser, London.

Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry, and S. Keith. 1997. The birds of Africa. Volume V. Academic Press, London.

Zimmerman, D.A., D.A. Turner, and D.J. Pearson. 1996. Birds of northern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 447, Grayish Flycatcher  Bradornis microrhynchus

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Zimmerman et al. 1996, Urban et al. 1997, Stevenson and Fanshawe 2002), change the English name of Bradornis microrhynchus from Grayish Flycatcher to African Gray Flycatcher.

Change the English name of the monotypic group Bradornis microrhynchus pumilus from Grayish Flycatcher (Ethiopian) to African Gray Flycatcher (Ethiopian).

Change the English name of the polytypic group Bradornis microrhynchus [microrhynchus Group] from Grayish Flycatcher (African Gray) to African Gray Flycatcher (African Gray).

References:

Stevenson, R., and J. Fanshawe. 2002. Field guide to the birds of East Africa. T & A D Poyser, London.

Urban, E.K., C.H. Fry, and S. Keith. 1997. The birds of Africa. Volume V. Academic Press, London.

Zimmerman, D.A., D.A. Turner, and D.J. Pearson. 1996. Birds of northern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

page 450, Slaty-backed Flycatcher  Ficedula sordida

Correct the species name from sordida to erithacus (David and Bruce 2016).

Reference:

David, N., and M. Bruce. 2016. The valid name of the Slaty-backed Flycatcher (previously, sordida Godwin-Austen, 1874, and hodgsonii J. P. Verreaux, 1871), and the gender of Caffrornis: comments on Zuccon (2011). Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 136: 299-301.

 

page 463, Buff-streaked Bushchat  Saxicola bifasciatus

Buff-streaked Bushchat is not a member of the genus Saxicola (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012); change the scientific name from Saxicola bifasciatus to Campicoloides bifasciatus. In accord with widespread usage (e.g, Keith et al. 1992, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name to Buff-streaked Chat.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 464, Sicklewing Chat  Cercomela sinuata

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. The oldest available name for the clade that includes Sicklewing Chat is Emarginata (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Sicklewing Chat from Cercomela sinuata to Emarginata sinuata. In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Keith et al. 1992, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name from Sicklewing Chat to Sickle-winged Chat.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals

extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 464, Karoo Chat  Cercomela schlegelii

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. The oldest available name for the clade that includes Karoo Chat is Emarginata (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Karoo Chat from Cercomela schlegelii to Emarginata schlegelii.

Subspecies kobosensis, with range “Namibia (Great Namaqualand)”, is considered to be a junior synonym of namaquensis (Keith et al. 1992, Hockey et al. 2005), and is deleted.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Tractrac Chat  Cercomela tractrac

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. The oldest available name for the clade that includes Tractrac Chat is Emarginata (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Tractrac Chat from Cercomela tractrac to Emarginata tractrac.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Moorland Chat  Cercomela sordida

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. The oldest available name for the clade that includes Moorland Chat is Pinarochroa (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Moorland Chat from Cercomela sordida to Pinarochroa sordida

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Moorland Chat (Abyssinian) from Cercomela sordida sordida to Pinarochroa sordida sordida.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Moorland Chat (Mt. Kenya) from Cercomela sordida ernesti to Pinarochroa sordida ernesti. Subspecies rudolfi, with range “N Kenya (Mt. Elgon moorlands) and adjacent e Uganda”, is considered to be a junior synonym of ernesti (Keith et al. 1992), and is deleted. Revise the range description for ernesti from “N Kenya (Mt. Kenya and Aberdare Mountains)” to “highlands of extreme eastern Uganda and of western and central Kenya”.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Moorland Chat (Ngorongoro) from Cercomela sordida olimotiensis to Pinarochroa sordida olimotiensis.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Moorland Chat (Mt. Kilimanjaro) from Cercomela sordida hypospodia to Pinarochroa sordida hypospodia.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Congo Moorchat  Myrmecocichla tholloni

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Keith et al. 1992, Gill and Wright 2006), change the English name of Myrmecocichla tholloni from Congo Moorchat to Congo Moor Chat.

References:

Gill, F., and M. Wright. 2006. Birds of the world: recommended English names. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 463, Mountain Wheatear  Oenanthe monticola

Genetic evidence indicates that Mountain Wheatear is embedded in the genus Myrmecocichla, and is not a true wheatear (Oenanthe) (Aliabadian et al. 2012; see also Sangster et al. 2010). Change the scientific name from Oenanthe monticola to Myrmecocichla monticola. Reposition Mountain Wheatear to follow Congo Moor Chat Myrmecocichla tholloni.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 575: 380-392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.07.008

 

page 466, White-headed Black-Chat  Myrmecocichla arnotti

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Hockey et al. 2005), change the English name of Myrmecocichla arnotti from White-headed Black-Chat to Arnot’s Chat.

References:

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Hockey, P.A.R., W.R.J. Dean, and P.G. Ryan (editors). 2005. Roberts Birds of southern Africa. VII edition. Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town.

 

page 465, White-fronted Black-Chat  Myrmecocichla albifrons

White-fronted Black-Chat is not a member of Myrmecocichla, but instead is embedded within wheatears (Oenanthe) (Sangster et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of White-fronted Black-Chat from Myrmecocichla albifrons to Oenanthe albifrons.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Sangster, G., P. Alström, E. Forsmark, and U. Olsson. 2010. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 575: 380-392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.07.008

 

page 465, Blackstart  Cercomela melanura

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. Blackstart is a member of the wheatear genus (Oenanthe) (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Blackstart from Cercomela melanura to Oenanthe melanura. Reposition Blackstart to follow Red-rumped Wheatear Oenanthe moesta.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Familiar Chat  Cercomela familiaris

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. Familiar Chat is a member of the wheatear genus (Oenanthe) (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Familiar Chat from Cercomela familiaris to Oenanthe familiaris. Reposition Familiar Chat to follow Blackstart Oenanthe melanura.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Sombre Chat  Cercomela dubia

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. Sombre Chat is a member of the wheatear genus (Oenanthe) (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Sombre Chat from Cercomela dubia to Oenanthe dubia. In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Keith et al. 1992, Dowsett and Forbes-Watson 1993, Gill and Wright 2006), change the English name from Sombre Chat to Sombre Rock Chat. Reposition Sombre Rock Chat to follow Familiar Chat Oenanthe familiaris.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Dowsett, R.J., and A.D. Forbes-Watson. 1993. Checklist of birds of the Afrotropical and Malagasy regions. Volume 1: species limits and distribution. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium.

Gill, F., and M. Wright. 2006. Birds of the world: recommended English names. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Brown-tailed Chat  Cercomela scotocerca

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. Brown-tailed Chat is a member of the wheatear genus (Oenanthe) (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Brown-tailed Chat from Cercomela scotocerca to Oenanthe scotocerca. Reposition Brown-tailed Chat to follow Sombre Rock Chat Oenanthe dubia.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Brown-tailed Chat (Brown-tailed) from Cercomela scotocerca [scotocerca Group] to Oenanthe scotocerca [scotocerca Group].

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Brown-tailed Chat (Pale) from Cercomela scotocerca spectatrix/validior to Oenanthe scotocerca spectatrix/validior.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary

relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular

Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

 

page 465, Indian Chat  Cercomela fusca

The traditional genus Cercomela is not monophyletic. Indian Chat is a member of the wheatear genus (Oenanthe) (Outlaw et al. 2010, Aliabadian et al. 2012). Change the scientific name of Indian Chat from Cercomela fusca to Oenanthe fusca. In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Inskipp et al 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name from Indian Chat to Brown Rock Chat. Reposition Brown Rock Chat to follow Brown-tailed Chat Oenanthe scotocerca.

References:

Aliabadian, M., M. Kaboli, M.I. Förschler, V. Nijman, A. Chamani, A. Tillier, R. Prodon, E. Pasquet, P.G.P. Ericson, and D. Zuccon. 2012. Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 65: 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.05.011

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Outlaw, R.K., G. Voelker, and R.C.K. Bowie. 2010. Shall we chat? Evolutionary

relationships in the genus Cercomela (Muscicapidae) and its relation to Oenanthe reveals extensive polyphyly among chats distributed in Africa, India and the Palearctic. Molecular

Phylogenetics and Evolution 55: 284-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2009.09.023

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

pages 463-466, wheatears and chats  genera Oenanthe, Cercomela, Myrmecocichla, Thamnolaea, and Pinarornis

The sequence of species of wheatears and related species is revised, following Outlaw et al. (2010) and Aliabadian et al. (2012). The new sequence of species is

Buff-streaked Chat  Campicoloides bifasciatus

Sickle-winged Chat  Emarginata sinuata

Karoo Chat  Emarginata schlegelii

Tractrac Chat  Emarginata tractrac

Moorland Chat  Pinarochroa sordida

Mocking Cliff-Chat  Thamnolaea cinnamomeiventris

White-winged Cliff-Chat  Thamnolaea semirufa

Sooty Chat  Myrmecocichla nigra

Northern Anteater-Chat  Myrmecocichla aethiops

Southern Anteater-Chat  Myrmecocichla formicivora

Congo Moor Chat  Myrmecocichla tholloni

Mountain Wheatear  Myrmecocichla monticola

R√ľppell’s Chat ¬†Myrmecocichla melaena

Arnot’s Chat ¬†Myrmecocichla arnotti

Ruaha Chat  Myrmecocichla collaris

Northern Wheatear  Oenanthe oenanthe

Capped Wheatear  Oenanthe pileata

Red-breasted Wheatear  Oenanthe bottae

Isabelline Wheatear  Oenanthe isabellina

Heuglin’s Wheatear ¬†Oenanthe heuglini

Hooded Wheatear  Oenanthe monacha

Desert Wheatear  Oenanthe deserti

Pied Wheatear  Oenanthe pleschanka

Black-eared Wheatear  Oenanthe hispanica

Cyprus Wheatear  Oenanthe cypriaca

White-fronted Black-Chat  Oenanthe albifrons

Somali Wheatear  Oenanthe phillipsi

Red-rumped Wheatear  Oenanthe moesta

Blackstart  Oenanthe melanura

Familiar Chat  Oenanthe familiaris

Sombre Rock Chat  Oenanthe dubia

Brown-tailed Chat  Oenanthe scotocerca

Brown Rock Chat  Oenanthe fusca

Variable Wheatear  Oenanthe picata

Black Wheatear  Oenanthe leucura

Hume’s Wheatear ¬†Oenanthe albonigra

White-crowned Wheatear  Oenanthe leucopyga

Arabian Wheatear  Oenanthe lugentoides

Abyssinian Wheatear  Oenanthe lugubris

Finsch’s Wheatear ¬†Oenanthe finschii

Mourning Wheatear  Oenanthe lugens

Kurdish Wheatear  Oenanthe xanthoprymna

Persian Wheatear  Oenanthe chrysopygia

Boulder Chat  Pinarornis plumosus

References:

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Shirihai, H., and L. Svensson. 2018. Handbook of Western Palaearctic birds. Volume 1. Helm, London.

 

page 546, Yellow-bellied Flowerpecker  Dicaeum melanoxanthum

Correct the spelling of the species name from melanoxanthum to the correct original spelling, melanozanthum (Dickinson and Christidis 2014).

Reference:

Dickinson, E.C., and L. Christidis. 2014. The Howard & Moore complete checklist of the birds of the world. Fourth edition. Volume 2. Aves Press, Eastbourne, United Kingdom

 

pages 537-538, Black Sunbird  Leptocoma sericea

Correct the species name from sericea to aspasia (LeCroy 2010).

Correct the name of the nominate subspecies from sericea to aspasia.

Revise the range description for subspecies caeruleogula from “Bismarck Archipelago (New Britain, Rook and Umboi)” to “southern Bismarck Archipelago (New Britain and associated islands, including Umboi, Sakar, Bali, and Watom)”.

Revise the range description for subspecies corinna from “Bismarck Archipelago (except Feni I.)” to “northeastern Bismarck Archipelago (New Ireland and associated islands, Lovangai south to Lihir, except for Feni Island)”.

Reference:

LeCroy, M. 2010. Type specimens of birds in the American Museum of Natural History. Part 8. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History number 333.

 

page 541, Long-billed Sunbird  Cinnyris lotenius

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Cinnyris lotenius from Long-billed Sunbird to Loten’s Sunbird.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 542, Gould’s Sunbird¬† Aethopyga gouldiae

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005), change the English name of Aethopyga gouldiae from Gould’s Sunbird to Mrs. Gould’s Sunbird.

Change the English name of the polytypic group Aethopyga gouldiae gouldiae/isolata from Gould’s Sunbird (Yellow-breasted) to Mrs. Gould’s Sunbird (Yellow-breasted).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Aethopyga gouldiae dabryii from Gould’s Sunbird (Scarlet-breasted) to Mrs. Gould’s Sunbird (Scarlet-breasted).

Change the English name of the monotypic group Aethopyga gouldiae annamensis from Gould’s Sunbird (Purple-rumped) to Mrs. Gould’s Sunbird (Purple-rumped).

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 535, Purple-naped Spiderhunter  Arachnothera hypogrammicum

Purple-naped Sunbird is better classified as the sister to Arachnothera, rather than as a member of that genus (Campillo et al. 2018). Previously it was classified in the genus Hypogramma, but this name is preoccupied by its earlier use in Lepidoptera (Gregory and Dickinson 2012); consequently the scientific name changes from Arachnothera hypogrammicum to Kurochkinegramma hypogrammicum. Reposition Purple-naped Sunbird to immediately follow Tboli Sunbird Aethopyga tiboli.

References:

Campillo, L.C., C.H. Oliveros, F.H. Sheldon, and R.G. Moyle. 2018. Genomic data resolve gene tree discordance in spiderhunters (Nectariniidae, Arachnothera). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 120: 151-157.       https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2017.12.011

Gregory, S.M.S., and E.C. Dickinson. 2012. An assessment of three little-noticed papers on avian nomenclature by G. N. Kashin during 1978‚Äď1982. Zootaxa 3340: 44-58.

 

page 609, Yellow Weaver  Ploceus megarhynchus

In accord with prevailing usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Ploceus megarhynchus from Yellow Weaver to Finn’s Weaver.

References:

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 609, Bengal Weaver  Ploceus benghalensis

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Inskipp et al. 1996, Grimmett et al. 1999, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Ploceus benghalensis from Bengal Weaver to Black-breasted Weaver.

References:

Grimmett, R., C. Inskipp, and T. Inskipp. 1999. A guide to the birds of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2012. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Second Edition. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

 

page 612, Lavender Waxbill  Estrilda caerulescens

Correct the spelling of the species name from caerulescens to coerulescens (David and Dickinson 2016).

Reference:

David, N., and E.C. Dickinson. 2016. The ligatures ‚Äź√¶‚Äź and ‚Äźoe‚Äź in Vieillot‚Äôs new avian names established in the Nouveau dictionnaire d‚Äôhistoire naturelle vols. I‚ÄźXXXVI (1816‚Äź1819). Zoological Bibliography 4: 15-26.

 

page 619, Tricolored Munia  Lonchura malacca

Subspecies rubronigra belongs with Chestnut Munia Lonchura atricapilla, not with Tricolored Munia (Restall 1996). Tricolored Munia now is monotypic. Change the scientific name for this subspecies from Lonchura malacca rubronigra to Lonchura atricapilla rubronigra, and reposition rubronigra immediately following the heading for the polytypic group Chestnut Munia (Chestnut) Lonchura atricapilla [atricapilla Group].

Reference:

Restall, R. 1996. Munias and mannikins. Pica Press, Sussex.

 

page 400, Himalayan Accentor  Prunella himalayana

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Prunella himalayana from Himalayan Accentor to Altai Accentor.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 603, Yellow-spotted Petronia  Gymnornis pyrgita

As Gymnoris pyrgita no longer is a member of the genus Petronia, change the English name from Yellow-spotted Petronia to Yellow-spotted Bush Sparrow. Correct the spelling of the genus name from Gymnornis to Gymnoris.

 

page 603, Chestnut-shouldered Petronia  Gymnornis xanthocollis

As Gymnoris xanthocollis no longer is a member of the genus Petronia, change the English name from Chestnut-shouldered Petronia to Yellow-throated Sparrow (Ripley 1982, Rasmussen and Anderton 2012, Praveen et al. 2016). Correct the spelling of the genus name from Gymnornis to Gymnoris.

References:

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

pages 603-604, Yellow-throated Petronia  Gymnornis superciliaris

As Gymnoris superciliaris no longer is a member of the genus Petronia, change the English name from Yellow-throated Petronia to Yellow-throated Bush Sparrow. Correct the spelling of the genus name from Gymnornis to Gymnoris.

 

page 604, Bush Petronia  Gymnornis dentata

As Gymnoris dentata no longer is a member of the genus Petronia, change the English name from Bush Petronia to Sahel Bush Sparrow. Correct the spelling of the genus name from Gymnornis to Gymnoris.

 

page 364, Buffy Pipit  Anthus vaalensis

Subspecies saphiroi and goodsoni, both previously included in Buffy Pipit Anthus vaalensis, are transferred to Plain-backed Pipit Anthus leucophrys, following Hall (1961) and Keith et al. (1992). Insert saphiroi following subspecies Anthus leucophrys omoensis, and insert goodsoni following subspecies omoensis and saphiroi.

References:

Hall, B.P. 1961. The taxonomy and identification of pipits (genus Anthus). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Zoology 7: 243-289.

Keith, S., E.K. Urban, and C.H. Fry (editors). 1992. The birds of Africa. Volume IV. Academic Press, London.

 

page 665, Chestnut-breasted Bunting  Emberiza stewarti

In accord with widespread usage (e.g., Ripley 1982, Inskipp et al. 1996, Rasmussen and Anderton 2005, Praveen et al. 2016), change the English name of Emberiza stewarti from Chestnut-breasted Bunting to White-capped Bunting.

References:

Inskipp, T., N. Lindsey, and W. Duckworth.  1996. An annotated checklist of the birds of the Oriental Region. Oriental Bird Club, Sandy, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Praveen, J., R. Jayapal, and A. Pittie. 2016. A checklist of the birds of India. Indian Birds 11: 113-170.

Rasmussen, P.C., and J.C. Anderton. 2005. Birds of South Asia. The Ripley guide. Volume 2: attributes and status. Smithsonian Institution and Lynx Edicions, Washington D.C. and Barcelona.

Ripley, S.D. 1982. A synopsis of the birds of India and Pakistan together with those of Nepal, Bhutan, Bangldesh and Srki Lanka. Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay.

 

page 676, Yellow-thighed Finch  Pselliophorus tibialis

Genetic data indicate that the genus Pselliophorus is embedded within Atlapetes (Klicka et al. 2014). Therefore, in accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2014), change the English name of Yellow-thighed Finch to Yellow-thighed Brushfinch, and change the scientific name from Pselliophorus tibialis to Atlapetes tibialis. Reposition Yellow-thighed Brushfinch to follow White-naped Brushfinch Atlapetes albinucha.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Klicka, J., F.K. Barker, K.J. Burns, S.M. Lanyon, I.J. Lovette, J.A. Chaves, and R.W. Bryson, Jr. 2014. A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 77: 177-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.04.025

 

page 676, Yellow-green Finch  Pselliophorus luteoviridis

Genetic data indicate that the genus Pselliophorus is embedded within Atlapetes (Klicka et al. 2014). Therefore, in accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2014), change the English name of Yellow-green Finch to Yellow-green Brushfinch, and change the scientific name from Pselliophorus luteoviridis to Atlapetes luteoviridis. Reposition Yellow-green Brushfinch to follow White-naped Brushfinch Atlapetes albinucha and Yellow-thighed Brushfinch Atlapetes tibialis.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Klicka, J., F.K. Barker, K.J. Burns, S.M. Lanyon, I.J. Lovette, J.A. Chaves, and R.W. Bryson, Jr. 2014. A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 77: 177-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.04.025

 

page 639, Tennessee Warbler  Oreothlypis peregrina

page 639, Orange-crowned Warbler  Oreothlypis celata

page 639, Colima Warbler  Oreothlypis crissalis

page 639, Lucy’s Warbler¬† Oreothlypis luciae

page 639, Nashville Warbler  Oreothlypis ruficapilla

page 639, Virginia’s Warbler¬† Oreothlypis virginiae

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 453x) and with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), the six northern species of Oreothlypis are separated into the genus Leiothlypis (see Sangster 2008, Lovette et al. 2010).

Change the scientific name of Tennessee Warbler from Oreothlypis peregrina to Leiothlypis peregrina.

Change the scientific name of Orange-crowned Warbler from Oreothlypis celata to Leiothlypis celata. Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Orange-crowned Warbler (celata) from Oreothlypis celata celata to Leiothlypis celata celata; change the scientific name of the monotypic group Orange-crowned Warbler (orestera) from Oreothlypis celata orestera to Leiothlypis celata orestera; change the scientific name of the monotypic group Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) from Oreothlypis celata lutescens to Leiothlypis celata lutescens; and change the scientific name of the monotypic group Orange-crowned Warbler (sordida) from Oreothlypis celata sordida to Leiothlypis celata sordida.

Change the scientific name of Colima Warbler from Oreothlypis crissalis to Leiothlypis crissalis.

Change the scientific name of Lucy’s Warbler from Oreothlypis luciae to Leiothlypis luciae.

Change the scientific name of Nashville Warbler from Oreothlypis ruficapilla to Leiothlypis ruficapilla. Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Nashville Warbler (ruficapilla) from Oreothlypis ruficapilla ruficapilla to Leiothlypis ruficapilla ruficapilla, and change the scientific name of the monotypic group Nashville Warbler (ridgwayi) from Oreothlypis ruficapilla ridgwayi to Leiothlypis ruficapilla ridgwayi.

Change the scientific name of Virginia’s Warbler from Oreothlypis virginiae to Leiothlypis virginiae.

References:

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

Lovette, I.J., J.I. Pérez-Emán, J.P. Sullivan, R.C. Banks, I. Fiorentino, S. Córdoba-Córdoba, M. Echeverry-Galvis, F.K. Barker, K.J. Burns, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and E.  Bermingham. 2010. A comprehensive multilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revised classification of the Parulidae (Aves). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 753-770. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2010.07.018

Sangster, G. 2008. A revision of Vermivora (Parulidae), with the description of a new genus. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club 128: 207-211.

 

page 661, Golden-naped Tanager  Tangara ruficervix

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.20), change the scientific name of Golden-naped Tanager from Tangara ruficervix to Chalcothraupis ruficervix, as genetic data (Burns et al. 2014; see also Burns et al. 2016) indicate that Tangara is paraphyletic with respect to Thraupis, and Golden-naped Tanager is not closely related to true Tangara.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Golden-naped Tanager (Golden-naped) from Tangara ruficervix [ruficervix Group] to Chalcothraupis ruficervix [ruficervix Group].

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Golden-naped Tanager (Rusty-naped) from Tangara ruficervix [fulvicervix Group] to Chalcothraupis ruficervix [fulvicervix Group].

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

 

page 659, Azure-rumped Tanager  Tangara cabanisi

page 659, Gray-and-gold Tanager  Tangara palmeri

Genetic data (Burns et al. 2014; see also Burns et al. 2016) indicate that Tangara is paraphyletic with respect to Thraupis, and that many species formerly included in that genus are not closely related to true Tanagara (Burns et al. 2014).

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.20) and AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the scientific name of Azure-rumped Tanager from Tangara cabanisi to Poecilostreptus cabanisi (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Azure-rumped Tanager to follow Golden-naped Tanager Chalcothraupis ruficervix.

Change the scientific name of Gray-and-gold Tanager from Tangara palmeri to Poecilostreptus palmeri (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Gray-and-gold Tanager to follow Golden-naped Tanager Chalcothraupis ruficervix and Azure-rumped Tanager Poecilostreptus cabanisi.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

page 662, Black-headed Tanager  Tangara cyanoptera

page 662, Silvery Tanager  Tangara viridicollis

page 662, Black-capped Tanager  Tangara heinei

page 662, Green-throated Tanager  Tangara argyrofenges

page 662, Sira Tanager  Tangara phillipsi

page 661, Black-backed Tanager  Tangara peruviana

page 661, Chestnut-backed Tanager  Tangara preciosa

page 661, Green-capped Tanager  Tangara meyerdeschauenseei

page 661, Burnished-buff Tanager  Tangara cayana

page 661, Lesser Antillean Tanager  Tangara cucullata

page 661, Scrub Tanager  Tangara vitriolina

page 661, Masked Tanager  Tangara nigrocincta

page 661, Golden-hooded Tanager  Tangara larvata

page 661, Blue-necked Tanager  Tangara cyanicollis

Genetic data (Burns et al. 2014; see also Burns et al. 2016) indicate that Tangara is paraphyletic with respect to Thraupis, and that many species formerly included in that genus are not closely related to true Tanagara (Burns et al. 2014).

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.20) and AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the scientific name of Black-headed Tanager from Tangara cyanoptera to Stilpnia cyanoptera (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Black-headed Tanager (Black-headed) from Tangara cyanoptera cyanoptera to Stilpnia cyanoptera cyanoptera, and change the scientific name of the monotypic group Black-headed Tanager (Black-hooded) from Tangara cyanoptera whitelyi to Stilpnia cyanoptera whitelyi.

Change the scientific name of Silvery Tanager from Tangara viridicollis to Stilpnia viridicollis (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Black-capped Tanager from Tangara heinei to Stilpnia heinei (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Green-throated Tanager from Tangara argyrofenges to Stilpnia argyrofenges (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Sira Tanager from Tangara phillipsi to Stilpnia phillipsi (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Black-backed Tanager from Tangara peruviana to Stilpnia peruviana (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Chestnut-backed Tanager from Tangara preciosa to Stilpnia preciosa (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Green-capped Tanager from Tangara meyerdeschauenseei to Stilpnia meyerdeschauenseei (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Burnished-buff Tanager from Tangara cayana to Stilpnia cayana (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Burnished-buff Tanager (Rufous-crowned) from Tangara cayana cayana/fulvescens to Stilpnia cayana cayana/fulvescens, and change the scientific name of the polytypic group Burnished-buff Tanager (Stripe-bellied) from Tangara cayana [flava Group] to Stilpnia cayana [flava Group].

Change the scientific name of Lesser Antillean Tanager from Tangara cucullata to Stilpnia cucullata (Burns et al. 2016). Change the scientific name of the mponotypic group Lesser Antillean Tanager (St. Vincent) from Tangara cucullata versicolor to Stilpnia cucullata versicolor, and change the scientific name of the mponotypic group Lesser Antillean Tanager (Grenada) from Tangara cucullata cucullata to Stilpnia cucullata cucullata.

Change the scientific name of Scrub Tanager from Tangara vitriolina to Stilpnia vitriolina (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Masked Tanager from Tangara nigrocincta to Stilpnia nigrocincta (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Golden-hooded Tanager from Tangara larvata to Stilpnia larvata (Burns et al. 2016).

Change the scientific name of Blue-necked Tanager from Tangara cyanicollis to Stilpnia cyanicollis (Burns et al. 2016).

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

page 667, Red-backed Sierra-Finch  Phrygilus dorsalis

page 668, White-throated Sierra-Finch  Phrygilus erythronotos

page 668, Short-tailed Finch  Idiopsar brachyurus

page 668, White-winged Diuca-Finch  Idiopsar speculifer

In accord with AOS-SACC (see Proposal 730.16), change the scientific name of Red-backed Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus dorsalis to Idiopsar dorsalis, and of White-throated Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus erythronotus to Idiopsar erythronotus.

Reposition Idiopsar to immediately follow Tit-like Dacnis Xenodacnis parina.

 

page 667, Mourning Sierra-Finch  Rhopospina fruticeti

Change the scientific name of Mourning Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus fruticeti to Rhopospina fruticeti (see Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Mourning Sierra-Finch to follow Little Inca-Finch Incaspiza watkinsi.

Change the scientific name of the polytypic group Mourning Sierra-Finch (Mourning) from Phrygilus fruticeti fruticeti/peruvianus to Rhopospina fruticeti fruticeti/peruviana.

Change the spelling of the scientific name of subspecies peruvianus to peruviana.

Change the scientific name of the monotypic group Mourning Sierra-Finch (Blackish) from Phrygilus fruticeti coracinus to Rhopospina fruticeti coracina.

Reference:

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

 

page 691, Blue Finch  Porphyrospiza caerulescens

page 668, Carbonated Sierra-Finch  Phrygilus carbonarius

page 668, Band-tailed Sierra-Finch  Phrygilus alaudinus

Reposition the genus Porphyrospiza to follow Mourning Sierra-Finch Rhopospina fruticeti.

In accord with AOS-SACC (see Proposal 730.02), change the scientific name of Carbonated Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus carbonarius to Porphyrospiza carbonaria. Reposition Carbonated Sierra-Finch to follow Blue Finch Porphyrospiza caerulescens.

In accord with AOS-SACC (see Proposal 730.02), change the scientific name of Band-tailed Sierra-Finch from Phrygilus alaudinus to Porphyrospiza alaudina. Reposition Band-tailed Sierra-Finch to follow Blue Finch Porphyrospiza caerulescens and Carbonated Sierra-Finch Porphyrospiza carbonaria. Change the spelling of the scientific name of subspecies bipartitus to bipartita, of the scientific name of subspecies excelsus to excelsa, and of the scientific name of nominate alaudinus to alaudina.

 

page 649, White-rumped Tanager  Cypsnagra hirundinacea

Reposition White-rumped Tanager to follow Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris.

 

page 668, Long-tailed Reed Finch  Donacospiza albifrons

Reposition Long-tailed Reed Finch to follow Gray-hooded Bush Tanager Cnemoscopus rubrirostris and White-rumped Tanager Cypsnagra hirundinacea.

 

page 669, Chestnut-breasted Mountain-Finch  Poospiza caesar

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.12), change the scientific name of Chestnut-breasted Warbling-Finch from Poospiza caesar to Poospizopsis caesar, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poospiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014, 2016). Reposition Chestnut-breasted Warbling-Finch to follow Long-tailed Finch Donacospiza albifrons.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

 

page 669, Rufous-sided Warbling-Finch  Poospiza hypochondria

In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.12), change the scientific name of Rufous-sided Warbling-Finch from Poospiza hypochondria to Poospizopsis hypochondria, based on genetic evidence that the genus Poospiza is not monophyletic (Burns et al. 2014, 2016). Reposition Rufous-sided Warbling-Finch to follow Long-tailed Finch Donacospiza albifrons and Chestnut-breasted Warbling-Finch Poospizopsis caesar.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

 

page 672, Cuban Grassquit  Tiaris canorus

Genetic data (Burns et al. 2014, 2016) indicate that Tiaris is not monophyletic. In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the scientific name of Cuban Grassquit from Tiaris canorus to Phonipara canora (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Cuban Grassquit to follow Yellow-shouldered Grassquit Loxipasser anoxanthus.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

page 672, Black-faced Grassquit  Tiaris bicolor

Genetic data (Burns et al. 2014) indicate that Tiaris is not monophyletic. In accord with AOS-NACC (Chesser et al. 2019), change the scientific name of Black-faced Grassquit from Tiaris bicolor to Melanospiza bicolor (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Black-faced Grassquit to follow St. Lucia Black Finch Melanospiza richardsoni.

Change the spelling of the subspecies name omissus to omissa.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

Chesser, R.T., K.J. Burns, C. Cicero, J.L. Dunn, A.W. Kratter, I.J. Lovette, P.C. Rasmussen, J.V. Remsen, Jr., D.F. Stotz, and K. Winker. 2019. Sixtieth supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American birds. Auk 136: xxx-xxx.

 

page 672, Dull-colored Grassquit  Tiaris obscurus

page 673, Sooty Grassquit  Tiaris fuliginosus

Genetic data (Burns et al. 2014) indicate that Dull-colored Grassquit and Sooty Grassquit are more closely related to Darwin’s finches than to true Tiaris. In accord with AOS-SACC (Proposal 730.04), these two species are transferred to the genus Asemospiza (Burns et al. 2016). Reposition Asemospiza to follow St. Lucia Black Finch Melanospiza richardsoni and Black-faced Grassquit Melanospiza bicolor. Change the scientific name of Dull-colored Grassquit from Tiaris obscurus to Asemospiza obscura. Change the spelling of the name of the nominate subspecies from obscurus to obscura, and change the spelling of subspecies name pacificus to pacifica.

Change the scientific name of Sooty Grassquit from Tiaris fuliginosus to Asemospiza fuliginosa. Reposition Sooty Grassquit to follow St. Lucia Black Finch Melanospiza richardsoni, Black-faced Grassquit Melanospiza bicolor, and Dull-colored Grassquit Asemospiza obscura.

References:

Burns, K.J., A.J. Shultz, P.O. Title, N.A. Mason, F.K. Barker, J. Klicka, S.M. Lanyon, and I.J. Lovette. 2014. Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 75: 41-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006

Burns, K.J., P. Unitt, and N.A. Mason. 2016. A genus-level classification of the family Thraupidae (Class Aves: Order Passeriformes). Zootaxa 4088: 329-354. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4088.3.2

 

page 688, Grayish Saltator  Saltator coerulescens

The groups of Grayish Saltator are revised, leading to the recognition of a third group, which is composed of subspecies drawn from both of the two previously recognized groups. The polytypic group Grayish Saltator (Middle American) Saltator coerulescens [grandis Group] now is limited to subspecies vigorsii, plumbiceps, grandis, yucatanensis, hesperis, and brevicaudus. A new polytypic group, Grayish Saltator (Caribbean) Saltator coerulescens [olivascens Group], includes two subspecies, plumbeus and brewsteri, that formerly were included in Grayish Saltator (Middle American), and subspecies olivascens, which previously was included in the polytypic group Grayish Saltator (Grayish) Saltator coerulescens [coerulescens Group]. The group Saltator coerulescens [coerulescens Group] now is limited to subspecies azarae, mutus, superciliaris, and coerulescens. Change the English name of this group to Grayish Saltator (Amazonian).

 

 

GROUPS

 

GROUPS ‚Äď newly created groups

 

Scaly-breasted Partridge (Tonkin) Arborophila chloropus tonkinensis
Scaly-breasted Partridge (Green-legged) Arborophila chloropus [chloropus Group]
Black Francolin (Western) Francolinus francolinus francolinus/arabistanicus
Black Francolin (Eastern) Francolinus francolinus [henrici Group]
Lined Quail-Dove (linearis) Zentrygon linearis linearis
Lined Quail-Dove (trinitatis) Zentrygon linearis trinitatis
Green Imperial-Pigeon (Enggano) Ducula aenea oenothorax
New Zealand Pigeon (New Zealand) Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae
Vaux’s Swift (aphanes) Chaetura vauxi aphanes
Amethyst-throated Sunangel (Merida) Heliangelus amethysticollis spencei
Collared Inca (Green) Coeligena torquata conradii
Collared Inca (Vilcabamba) Coeligena torquata eisenmanni
Amazilia Hummingbird (Green-throated) Amazilia amazilia amazilia
Amazilia Hummingbird (Blue-throated) Amazilia amazilia caeruleigularis
Northern Fulmar (Atlantic) Fulmarus glacialis glacialis/auduboni
Stewart Island Shag (Otago) Phalacrocorax chalconotus chalconotus
Stewart Island Shag (Foveaux) Phalacrocorax chalconotus stewarti
Crested Serpent-Eagle (Andaman) Spilornis cheela davisoni
Great Black Hawk (Northern) Buteogallus urubitinga ridgwayi
Great Black Hawk (Southern) Buteogallus urubitinga urubitinga
Pacific Screech-Owl (lambi) Megascops cooperi lambi
Pacific Screech-Owl (cooperi) Megascops cooperi cooperi
Northern Saw-whet Owl (acadicus) Aegolius acadicus acadicus
Northern Saw-whet Owl (Haida Gwaii) Aegolius acadicus brooksi
White-headed Woodhoopoe (bollei/jacksoni) Phoeniculus bollei bollei/jacksoni
White-headed Woodhoopoe (Oku) Phoeniculus bollei okuensis
Forest Woodhoopoe (Western) Phoeniculus castaneiceps castaneiceps
Forest Woodhoopoe (Eastern) Phoeniculus castaneiceps brunneiceps
Sulawesi Dwarf-Kingfisher (Sangihe) Ceyx fallax sangirensis
Sulawesi Dwarf-Kingfisher (Sulawesi) Ceyx fallax fallax
Blue-breasted Bee-eater (Blue-breasted) Merops variegatus [variegatus Group]
Blue-breasted Bee-eater (Ethiopian) Merops variegatus lafresnayii
Golden-throated Barbet (Himalayan) Psilopogon franklinii franklinii
Golden-throated Barbet (Malaysian) Psilopogon franklinii ramsayi
Lesser Vasa Parrot (Comoro) Coracopsis nigra sibilans
Lesser Vasa Parrot (Black) Coracopsis nigra nigra/libs
Eclectus Parrot (Moluccan) Eclectus roratus roratus/vosmaeri
Eclectus Parrot (Sumba) Eclectus roratus cornelia
Eclectus Parrot (Tanimbar) Eclectus roratus riedeli
Eclectus Parrot (Papuan) Eclectus roratus [polychloros Group]
Singing Parrot (Northern) Geoffroyus heteroclitus heteroclitus
Singing Parrot (Rennell) Geoffroyus heteroclitus hyacinthinus
Painted Tiger-Parrot (Snow Mountains) Psittacella picta lorentzi
Painted Tiger-Parrot (Eastern) Psittacella picta picta/excelsa
Orange-breasted Fig-Parrot (Creamy-breasted) Cyclopsitta gulielmitertii amabilis/ramuensis
Papuan Lorikeet (Vogelkop) Charmosyna papou papou
Papuan Lorikeet (Stella’s) Charmosyna papou [stellae Group]
Coconut Lorikeet (Coconut) Trichoglossus haematodus [haematodus Group]
Maroon-tailed Parakeet (Huila) Pyrrhura melanura chapmani
Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Scarlet-fronted) Psittacara wagleri wagleri/transilis
Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Cordilleran) Psittacara wagleri frontatus/minor
Scaled Antpitta (guatimalensis Group) Grallaria guatimalensis [guatimalensis Group]
Scaled Antpitta (princeps/chocoensis) Grallaria guatimalensis princeps/chocoensis
Scaled Antpitta (aripoensis) Grallaria guatimalensis aripoensis
Scaled Antpitta (roraimae) Grallaria guatimalensis roraimae
Scaled Antpitta (regulus/carmelitae) Grallaria guatimalensis regulus/carmelitae
Scaled Antpitta (sororia) Grallaria guatimalensis sororia
Northern Barred-Woodcreeper (Western) Dendrocolaptes sanctithomae [sanctithomae Group]
Northern Barred-Woodcreeper (Eastern) Dendrocolaptes sanctithomae punctipectus
Creamy-breasted Canastero (Huancavelica) Asthenes dorbignyi huancavelicae
Buff-throated Purpletuft (Northern) Iodopleura pipra leucopygia
Buff-throated Purpletuft (Southern) Iodopleura pipra pipra
Green-backed Becard (Green-cheeked) Pachyramphus viridis griseigularis
Common Tody-Flycatcher (cinereum Group) Todirostrum cinereum [cinereum Group]
Common Tody-Flycatcher (sclateri) Todirostrum cinereum sclateri
Yellow-margined Flycatcher (neglectus) Tolmomyias assimilis neglectus
Yellow-margined Flycatcher (examinatus) Tolmomyias assimilis examinatus
Yellow-margined Flycatcher (obscuriceps) Tolmomyias assimilis obscuriceps
Yellow-margined Flycatcher (assimilis Group) Tolmomyias assimilis [assimilis Group]
Yellow-margined Flycatcher (paraensis) Tolmomyias assimilis paraensis
Sooty-headed Tyrannulet (griseiceps) Phyllomyias griseiceps griseiceps
Sooty-headed Tyrannulet (cristatus) Phyllomyias griseiceps cristatus
Sooty-headed Tyrannulet (caucae) Phyllomyias griseiceps caucae
Sooty-headed Tyrannulet (pallidiceps) Phyllomyias griseiceps pallidiceps
Bran-colored Flycatcher (Mouse-gray) Myiophobus fasciatus crypterythrus
Rufous-naped Ground-Tyrant (Chestnut-naped) Muscisaxicola rufivertex occipitalis
Graceful Honeyeater (gracilis) Meliphaga gracilis gracilis
Graceful Honeyeater (imitatrix) Meliphaga gracilis imitatrix
Common Cicadabird (Slender-billed) Edolisoma tenuirostre [tenuirostre Group]
Common Cicadabird (Obi) Edolisoma tenuirostre obiense/pelingi
Common Cicadabird (Moluccan) Edolisoma tenuirostre grayi
Common Cicadabird (Geelvink) Edolisoma tenuirostre meyerii/numforanum
Common Cicadabird (Rossel) Edolisoma tenuirostre rostratum
Common Cicadabird (Melanesian) Edolisoma tenuirostre [erythropygium Group]
Yellow-throated Whistler (Moluccan) Pachycephala macrorhyncha [macrorhyncha Group]
Yellow-throated Whistler (Timor) Pachycephala macrorhyncha calliope
Yellow-throated Whistler (Banda Sea) Pachycephala macrorhyncha par/compar
Yellow-throated Whistler (Damar) Pachycephala macrorhyncha dammeriana
Yellow-throated Whistler (Babar) Pachycephala macrorhyncha sharpei
Dark Newtonia (amphichroa) Newtonia amphichroa amphichroa
Dark Newtonia (lavarambo) Newtonia amphichroa lavarambo
Rufous Vanga (rufa) Schetba rufa rufa
Rufous Vanga (occidentalis) Schetba rufa occidentalis
White-headed Vanga (viridis) Artamella viridis viridis
White-headed Vanga (annae) Artamella viridis annae
Chestnut-bellied Monarch (Chestnut-bellied) Monarcha castaneiventris castaneiventris/obscurior
Chestnut-bellied Monarch (Makira) Monarcha castaneiventris megarhynchus
Chestnut-bellied Monarch (Ugi) Monarcha castaneiventris ugiensis
Pacific Robin (Solomons) Petroica pusilla [polymorpha Group]
Pacific Robin (Vanuatu) Petroica pusilla [pusilla Group]
Pacific Robin (Samoan) Petroica pusilla pusilla
Eurasian Skylark (Far Eastern) Alauda arvensis japonica/intermedia
Stripe-throated Jery (Stripe-throated) Neomixis striatigula striatigula/sclateri
Stripe-throated Jery (Subdesert) Neomixis striatigula pallidior
Olive-green Camaroptera (Olive-green) Camaroptera chloronota [chloronota Group]
Olive-green Camaroptera (Tawny-breasted) Camaroptera chloronota toroensis/kamitugaensis
Rock-loving Cisticola (Huambo) Cisticola aberrans bailunduensis
Zitting Cisticola (tinnabulans Group) Cisticola juncidis [tinnabulans Group]
Zitting Cisticola (Eastern) Cisticola juncidis brunniceps
Papuan Grassbird (interscapularis/mayri) Cincloramphus macrurus interscapularis/mayri
Papuan Grassbird (macrurus Group) Cincloramphus macrurus [macrurus Group]
Rock Martin (Red-throated) Ptyonoprogne fuligula fusciventris/bansoensis
Rock Martin (Large) Ptyonoprogne fuligula [fuligula Group]
Pacific Swallow (Pacific) Hirundo tahitica [javanica Group]
Pacific Swallow (Tahiti) Hirundo tahitica tahitica
Cream-vented Bulbul (White-eyed) Pycnonotus simplex simplex/halizonus
Cream-vented Bulbul (Red-eyed) Pycnonotus simplex perplexus/prillwitzi
Ashy Bulbul (Brown-backed) Hemixos flavala remotus
Abyssinian White-eye (Socotra) Zosterops abyssinicus socotranus
Lemon-bellied White-eye (Lemon-bellied) Zosterops chloris [chloris Group]
Lemon-bellied White-eye (Wakatobi) Zosterops chloris flavissimus
Capuchin Babbler (Black-crowned) Turdoides atripennis rubiginosus
Common Hill Myna (Common) Gracula religiosa [religiosa Group]
Common Hill Myna (Tenggara) Gracula religiosa venerata
Meves’s Starling (Cunene) Lamprotornis mevesii violacior
White-breasted Thrasher (Martinique) Ramphocinclus brachyurus brachyurus
White-breasted Thrasher (St. Lucia) Ramphocinclus brachyurus sanctaeluciae
Scaly Thrush (Iriomotejima) Zoothera dauma iriomotensis
Abyssinian Ground-Thrush (Abyssinian) Geokichla piaggiae [piaggiae Group]

Abyssinian Ground-Thrush (Kivu) Geokichla piaggiae tanganjicae
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Hill) Cyornis banyumas [whitei Group]
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Javan) Cyornis banyumas banyumas/ligus
Hill Blue Flycatcher (Dayak) Cyornis banyumas montanus
Sulawesi Blue Flycatcher (Tanahjampea) Cyornis omissus djampeanus
Sulawesi Blue Flycatcher (Kalao) Cyornis omissus kalaoensis
East Coast Akalat (Montane) Sheppardia gunningi alticola
East Coast Akalat (Benson’s) Sheppardia gunningi bensoni
East Coast Akalat (Gunning’s) Sheppardia gunningi gunningi
Arnot’s Chat (Angola) Myrmecocichla arnotti harterti
Arnot‚Äôs Chat (Arnot’s) Myrmecocichla arnotti arnotti
Olive-backed Sunbird (Rand’s) Cinnyris jugularis idenburgi
Red-headed Fody (Grand Comoro) Foudia eminentissima consobrina
Red Avadavat (Red-bellied) Amandava amandava amandava/punicea
Red Avadavat (Yellow-bellied) Amandava amandava flavidiventris
Paramo Pipit (meridae) Anthus bogotensis meridae
Paramo Pipit (bogotensis Group) Anthus bogotensis [bogotensis Group]
Gray-hooded Sierra-Finch (minor) Phrygilus gayi minor
Gray-hooded Sierra-Finch (gayi/caniceps) Phrygilus gayi gayi/caniceps
Grayish Saltator (Caribbean) Saltator coerulescens [olivascens Group]