Engagement in Science and Nature

Birds are not optional and life on earth is fundamentally interdependent—these concepts are at the heart of the Center for Engagement in Science and Nature’s educational mission. The Center inspires people of all ages and backgrounds to connect with birds and nature, build their knowledge, and share their observations so that together we can gain insight into how natural systems work and address global conservation challenges. We celebrate the collective power of our community to support bird and earth-friendly habits and policies.

Projects

  • colorful birds at Bird Academy

    Bird Academy

    Whether you’re a bird lover, an educator, or a student, our interactive courses and multimedia-rich resources will lead you into the fascinating lives of birds, from birding basics to comprehensive ornithology.

  • Birdsleuth children gardening, by Darcy Petzold.

    K-12 Education

    Our curricula and professional development opportunities empower educators to engage youth in scientific investigations, citizen-science projects, and habitat improvement initiatives to ignite a lifelong passion for nature.

  • Cornell Lab Visitor Center, entrance by Diane Tessaglia-Hymes.

    Visitor Center

    Come experience the Lab! If you live in Ithaca or are visiting from afar you can enjoy behind-the-scenes tours, guided walks, and exhibits. Log in virtually to gain access to Lab experts through webinars, workshops, and family programs.

  • Noise Project, by Marilu Lopez Fretts

    Noise Project

    Explore this co-created international community science project focused on noise pollution, equity, and well-being through connection with nature and birds. We build and document processes to promote more equitable scientific research together with a network of community partners.

  • Engaging Latin American and Caribbean Communities

    Explore educational materials, resources, and opportunities for engaging Latin American and Caribbean communities with birding, citizen science, and conservation actions.

  • Orchard Orioles by Pam Garcia/Project FeederWatch.

    Project FeederWatch

    Contribute to a three-decade long dataset about backyard birds and keep track of what is happening in your yard with FeederWatch. You don’t even need a feeder!

  • Ruby-throated HUmmingbird by Joel Trick/Macaulay Library

    NestWatch

    Help measure nature’s success. Learn how to find and monitor bird nests, then record data on species, eggs, and young. Your contributions help scientists understand how climate change, urbanization, and land use affect breeding birds.

  • CUBs parade in NY. Photo courtesy of CUBs.

    Celebrate Urban Birds

    Join our bilingual year-round project by watching for 10 minutes and reporting on 16 “focal” species of birds. The project focuses on those who have historically been excluded from birding and citizen science though mini-grants and educational kits that support community art, local events and local habitat projects.

  • Black-capped Chickadee by Lin McGrew/GBBC.

    Great Backyard Bird Count

    Birds are everywhere, all the time, doing fascinating things! Join us for one weekend in February to watch, celebrate, and count birds to create a real-time snapshot of bird populations from around the world. Put Your Birds On the Map.

  • Tree Swallow eggs by Paula Ziebarth/NestWatch.

    Nest Quest Go!

    Join us in discovering the dynamic lives of nesting birds by helping to transcribe more than 300,000 historic nest record cards submitted to the Cornell Lab. It’s fun, easy, and provides a valuable contribution to future bird research.

Priorities

Powering Learning and Participation

Developing and Supporting Engagement Strategies

 

Program Staff

Photo Credits:

Photos courtesy of the Cornell Lab except Orchard Orioles by Pam Garcia/Project FeederWatch; Ruby-throated Hummingbird by Joel Trick/Macaulay Library; Black-capped Chickadee by Lin McGrew/GBBC; Noise Project, by Marilu Lopez Fretts; Festival Aves Urbanas Toluca in Mexico, courtesy of Alianza Mexicana por la Conservación de la Vida Silvestre (AMECVIS); Tree Swallow eggs by Paula Ziebarth/NestWatch.

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